Norlin era laquer vs 90’s vs current

Pappy58

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Personally I think the checking has subsided as more and more homes, building, cars, become climate controlled. In the 50s and 60s and much smaller percentage of the above had A/C. Instruments were subjected to much more extreme temp and humidity changes, and as a result you see more checking in instruments from the Era. ...and many Fenders from that era "chipped" rather than "checked". Not to say the formula's havn't been tinkered with, I just think it's not a big a factor. I mean, todays modern aged guitars are checked by freezing them....:run: :shock:
 

ARandall

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^ Funny you say that......

Amongst the guitars I have built, quite a few of them that have the supposed more flexible nitro formula have started checking all by themselves and within 3-4 years of being completed. Some have spent a lot of time in cases too......go figure.
 

tigger

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^ Funny you say that......

Amongst the guitars I have built, quite a few of them that have the supposed more flexible nitro formula have started checking all by themselves and within 3-4 years of being completed. Some have spent a lot of time in cases too......go figure.
It could be due to the wood changing in moisture content..
 

ARandall

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After its already been finished?!?

I mean its possible in theory, but I'm not spotting a huge amount of places for the moisture to either enter or exit.
 

PierM

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It's curious as I never had a Gibson checking in +30 years, apart one, that it's the oldest and most abused in the pack. As for the yellowing, I noticed the late 80' until the mid '90 Gibsons, they had a crazy fast and strong yellow/greenish pattern.
 

tigger

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Yellowing will depend on the thickness of the clear coat. For instance some ow strata don't yellow because they have no clear coat, others look like bananas.
 

zamdrang

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^ Funny you say that......

Amongst the guitars I have built, quite a few of them that have the supposed more flexible nitro formula have started checking all by themselves and within 3-4 years of being completed. Some have spent a lot of time in cases too......go figure.
Interesting. This past summer I refinished a Tele with Stew Mac nitro, it started checking, particularly around some of the screw holes, before I even got finished wet sanding it.
 

ARandall

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Thats the water getting into the holes and the wood expanding. I've had that happen too. If you seal holes or drillings then this happens less.
 

deeno11

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My 82 has some pretty sweet checking on the back of the headstock. Aside from the binding yellowing, the Sunburst hasn’t faded one bit.
 

AtomicModern

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If you compare the two LP Customs I have in my shop right now, one is a ‘76 and the other is a ‘72, they have radically different amounts of checking. Both guitars have a similar amount of honest play wear and similar levels of yellowing on the binding; but the ‘76 has no checking at all while the ‘72 has a massive amount of checking. That could easily come down to the environments the guitars were kept in, but both guitars have spent their lives in Texas. The difference is pretty striking and I’d like to think the lacquer formulation is different, but there are just too many variables to be sure...
 




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