Non-Stick Frying Pan

mudface

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I don't use non-stick pots & pans. Ugh! I put enough bad shit in my body without cooking bad shit into my food. They are all crap. Even the better ones are crap. Learn how to cook.

We only use AllClad copper core, stainless steel pots & pans, along with a LeCreuset cast pan & dutch oven for certain things.
Wouldn’t those be considered non-stick as well?.... it doesn’t require a chemically coated pan...
 

Bigfoot410

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We use Calphalon Premier. no issues after 8 years with them.

Superior Cookware Built to Last​

Enjoy exceptional performance and endless possibilities when you cook with Calphalon Premier Hard-Anodized Nonstick Cookware. Made with MineralShield nonstick technology that includes some of Earth's hardest minerals, these pots and pans are now 5x more durable than before,* ensuring effortless food release over and over again. Cook confidently knowing you can make and serve even the most delicate foods with ease.

6335106_rd.jpg
 

dspelman

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What is the best and the longest lasting non-stick frying pan?

No regard to price...
No idea. I routinely use the poo out of a set of cheap CostCo non-sticks and then go buy another set. I see them as semi-disposable. Cast iron, on the other hand, seems to last forever. I have some of those pans that are at least 100 years old, and use them almost daily.
 

dspelman

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Le Creuset 11.75". Full stop.

Vintage Griswold and Wagner cast iron is also worth paying for.
I've got a stack of Wagners, but even the recent Lodge stuff is decent.

I've been wanting a La Creuset 7-quart dutch oven forever, but can't make my arm extend the credit card that far for the price they're asking. Maybe I'll start haunting the Goodwills for one, though I think you have to be the first one in the door for a lot of weeks before you'll find one.
 

SteveC

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Wouldn’t those be considered non-stick as well?.... it doesn’t require a chemically coated pan...

I don't think so... but, I could be wrong. I was always under the impression that non-stick was some kind of coated, or chemically-infused surface.

SS is anything BUT non-stick. I've scrubbed enough of them - LOL
 

dspelman

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Gordon Ramsay's Hell's Kitchen uses these:

Hexclad

I can't think of a tougher environment than that.

Non-stick, day in-day out tough use.
None of those pans is used more than a season on the show, and a season is maybe 13 weeks. They bring in new ones regularly so they don't look nasty on camera. FAR from a tough environment.

I was an advertising photographer for years, and we'd get new sets of the Zwilling-style knives two or three times a year even if they'd never been used. Logos change, etc. I have maybe half a dozen sets of really good knives as a result (a few have never been used and are just sitting in reserve for the day my lovely spouse uses one as a screwdriver.

Same with non-stick pans on cooking shows. You'll never see one with a baked-on food bottom.
 

Leee

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I was an advertising photographer for years
You should have photographed guitars.

I’m not kidding.
I bought a few beautiful collector pieces from a guy who was in that specific business.
Evidently, he did a lot of work with Fender and Gibson.
 

Brek

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I just bought a coup,e of scan pans for my new induction hob, pretty awesome so far, can fry without oil, with is kinda wild, nothing sticks to it at all, although will miss the Maillard reaction by Mauviel pans provided so effortlessly.
 

dspelman

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You should have photographed guitars.

I’m not kidding.
I bought a few beautiful collector pieces from a guy who was in that specific business.
Evidently, he did a lot of work with Fender and Gibson.
Did. I have over 40 guitars.
 

Droog

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Cast iron, no soap for cleaning, re season from time to time. Nothing does a better job at cooking, and will last a life time
 
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SteveGangi

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I've got cast iron cookware that I bought thirty years ago... a couple of skillets... but I also inhereted a dutch oven and a couple other pieces of cast iron cookware that were manufactured in the late 1930's.

The stuff is pretty slick indeed. So slick, in fact, that to clean these pots and pans I just rinse 'em with a little hot water-- no soap unless you want to kill your seasoning-- and then I just wipe it out with a paper towel. Ain't a particle left of what I cooked in there... and if you store your cookware correctly it won't even rust.

--R :thumb:
Same here. I use the hottest water I can get out of the faucet, and then wipe it off. No soap.
 

SteveGangi

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This is the one I settled on. Similar to the Le Creuset mentioned earlier. Pricey, but worth it in my experience. Not quite as finicky as normal cast iron (again, in my experience).

View attachment 651765

**I still keep a normal non-stick around for the wife because "it's too heavy."
I actually prefer the heavy ones... Light pans skate around. Heavy ones stay put. I just use two hands and oven mitts to move it, if it's still hot.
 

Skeletor

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I bought a really nice 6 liter stainless soup pot recently on sale, incredible price...MADE IN CANADA. seriously!
Where did you find the soup pot?
Any chance to support "local" is a good thing - I'll keep my eyes open for them.
 

rogue3

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Where did you find the soup pot?
Any chance to support "local" is a good thing - I'll keep my eyes open for them.
Here ya go Skeletor...My local Canadian Tire was blowing out these Paderno 5.4 quart stainless steel " dutch ovens" for 69$, marked down from 170$.
Stamp on the bottom" Proudly Made in Canada". (after a little reading, actually made in the Paderno factory on Prince Edward Island). perhaps why the quality is so affordable?...not imported :rofl:
paderno-5-qt-stainless-steel-dutch-oven-thumb.jpeg
 

pnuggett

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Non stick cookware is fine for some things like eggs but it's too finicky for me to invest much money for it. T-Fal or similar and replace when needed. I put my money into other cookware. Enameled cast iron, cast iron, and stainless steel.


Non stick

1. Avoid metal utensils. Metal can scrape or otherwise mar the nonstick surface, causing food to stick and making the pan hard to clean. Also, you don’t want to be ingesting flakes of coating in your food. Once the finish on your pan is damaged, you’ll have to discard it. To avoid this, stock up on silicone, plastic, and wooden utensils to use instead—they won’t harm your pan.

2. Don’t stack ’em. Don’t stack or nest your nonstick pans. The bottom of one pan may scratch the cooking surface of another. Calphalon, among other brands, warns owners of its cookware that nesting pans or storing lids between them can void the warranty. If you don’t have space and stacking is a must, put a potholder, a dish towel, or some other soft layer between pans to protect the cooking surface.

3. Skip the cooking spray. Cooking sprays burn at a lower temperature than butter or oil and can leave a sticky buildup on your pan that’s hard to remove. In fact, Anolon says in its owner’s manual that the use of cooking spray on a nonstick coating will void the pan’s warranty. If you like to spritz a little oil on the pan before you cook, fill a mister with your preferred vegetable oil or olive oil.

4. Don’t heat a nonstick pan when it’s empty. Unlike with, say, a cast-iron pan that can withstand high heat for searing a steak, heating an empty nonstick pan can damage the coating and shorten its life, according to T-Fal, a major manufacturer of nonstick skillets. In addition, overheating coatings with PTFE can produce fumes that are potentially toxic to pet birds and harmful to humans.

5. Don’t submerge a hot pan in water. The rule about never plunging a hot pan in water is especially true for nonstick pans, which tend to be lighter weight and more prone to warping. Once a pan warps, you’re cooked, because the pan won’t make proper contact with the burner and won’t heat evenly. As Calphalon warns in its owners’ manuals: Allow pans to cool completely before washing.

6. Don’t put a nonstick pan in the dishwasher. (Even if it’s labeled as dishwasher-safe.) We can tell you that not all dishwashers and dishwasher detergents are created equal. High heat and harsh detergents can damage both the nonstick surface and the exterior of the pan. “Every dishwasher and detergent is different,” says Erin Fuchsen, a spokesperson for T-Fal, whose nonstick pans are labeled as dishwasher-safe. “If the dishwasher uses very high heat or the detergents are harsh, this can cause the nonstick surface to dry out.”

7. Be careful how you clean your pan. Nonstick pans clean up so easily that we no longer test them for ease of cleaning in the lab. Skip abrasive pads or sponges, which can scratch the pan’s surface. All you need is a plain sponge, soap, and water.

But don’t go too easy with the cleaning, says RJ Manoni, director of e-commerce at Swiss Diamond. If you see oil building up on your pan, the company recommends spreading on a paste of baking soda and water, letting it sit for up to 24 hours, then washing it off. Most of the time this restores the nonstick properties. Also, don’t use a paper towel to clean a nonstick pan. It could leave food debris that can cause the pan to smoke and burn the next time you use it, Manoni says.
 

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