nitro rattle can splatter question

J-Dizzle

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Was spraying over the weekend with a rattle can of clear nitro - similar to Reranch but the Australian made equivalent. The can was unused, but a bit old, about 1 to 2 years old.

The paint must not have been shaken up enough before use, or perhaps had started to congeal/thicken inside the can due to age, because it splattered drops of nitro when I was spraying. It looked like someone had sneezed on the guitar.

Fortunately it was on the back of the guitar, and the nitro was clear. I shook the can lots more and cleaned the nozzle with spirits, then tested the can again on some scrap wood but it kept splattering.

So moving forward, what is the best way to clean up what has been done to the guitar? Should I sand it back, or if I just continue to spray clear nitro from a new can over the top, will the splatter spots melt into the new nitro layers and become invisible?
 

DRF

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I think you could let that coat dry so it's not gummy then carefully sand it back before the next coats.

It might even dry and shrink in overnight to where it's not really noticeable.

Lacquer is chemical bonding and should burn in. I'm not sure about these acrylic lacquers though.
 

LtDave32

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If you sand the spots right now, you risk a burn through.

Go ahead and throw a few more coats on there. You can block sand with fine paper after you lay some more coats down. then buff it when it's dry.

Lacquer is very forgiving that way.

Get it level and you'll never see it.
 

ARandall

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Its one of the problem with cans. The more coats you put on over the top the more the edges of the splatter will round off then disappear.
Additionally if you can manage to get on a few coats with the back sitting horizontally/flat then the gravity/re-melting effect might help to level out the spots as well
 

J-Dizzle

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Cheers guys.

To clarify, the splatter went onto the bare wood. I had just started shooting.

Am I correct in assuming that if I sand down the splatter so there are no lumps, then get a new can and shoot over the top, that as long as there is no more splatter, the nitro should all just melt together eventually and the splatters will become invisible?

I will also warm the can in warm water before I spray, I have done that in the past with Preval sprayers.
 

ARandall

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Well, you can sand if there is no stain in the wood/grainfill.
Have you put sealer on??? You will be using a LOT of nitro if you haven't sealed first.
 

J-Dizzle

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Well, you can sand if there is no stain in the wood/grainfill.
Have you put sealer on??? You will be using a LOT of nitro if you haven't sealed first.

I sealed the grain with Timbermate.
 

ARandall

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I know timbermate does grainfiller, but do they have sealer as well??

Usually sealer is a spray product you use to fill the rest of the large pores as well as small ones - plus the 'soaking into the wood' effect the first couple of coats of nitro seems to do.
When you said 'bare wood' it seems to me that you haven't done sealing. Now that step is not essential.....I've simply sprayed nitro onto bare wood too after grainfill. But 10 coats later when you're still level sanding to even out the sunken grain and not got onto building depth, any humour has long gone. After 2 coats of sealer with its quick build you have already filled more....that is its design brief.
 

BadMojo

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If you have enough lacquer built up you could wet sand it out after a few hours or just keep spraying and level it out later. Each coat will melt into the one before it.
 

J-Dizzle

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I know timbermate does grainfiller, but do they have sealer as well??

Usually sealer is a spray product you use to fill the rest of the large pores as well as small ones - plus the 'soaking into the wood' effect the first couple of coats of nitro seems to do.
When you said 'bare wood' it seems to me that you haven't done sealing. Now that step is not essential.....I've simply sprayed nitro onto bare wood too after grainfill. But 10 coats later when you're still level sanding to even out the sunken grain and not got onto building depth, any humour has long gone. After 2 coats of sealer with its quick build you have already filled more....that is its design brief.

You can use Timbermate as a sanding sealer as well. I have done so before and it works fine to fill the large and small pores (although most people use other sanding sealers as a matter of preference).

When I said "bare wood" I simply meant that I was spraying the very first coat of nitro when it splattered rather than the 5th or 10th. There was no previous layer of nitro for the splatters to melt into.
 

ARandall

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Then simply spraying continual coats should be fine. The closer you are to the start of the clearcoating the more these sort of issues simply melt away - pun intended.
 

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