Nikolas Cruz Parkland Shooter Trial

Crotch

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Bottom line is, the jury was given the opportunity to give him death. Based on their verdicts, the judge will 99.9999% not give him death. No matter how persuasive the victim statements are.
 

WaywerdSon

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Life without parole would be my guess. Thats usually the payoff for pleading guilty instead of forcing everybody to go through the pain of a jury trial. And thats far better for the victims families than the death penatly. With this convict, with documented mental issues, the appeals would drag on for decades. the families would have to drag themselves back to court over and over and relive it over and over, and the end result is the sentence would likely eventually be commuted to life anyway. Get it over with, let the families go back to living their lives and never have to see the POS ever again.
 

PeteK

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Does he even have the mental capacity to understand what a slow torturous death is? He seems pretty fucking nuts.
 

Roberteaux

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The judges usually go with the jury's recommendation in capital cases in Florida, with the reason being that the disparity in sentencing creates grounds for a costly-- and usually lengthy-- series of appeals.

It is also the Constitutional effect. I know one of the judges who was charged with re-writing the Florida Constitution back in 1977, and he told me personally that he and the other judges deliberately gave as much ruler-juice to our citizens as to any cop, judge, politician, lawyer, governor, or other big shot. A Florida jury can beat any of them.

The result is that the chances of an appellate court overturning the death penalty imposed by a circuit court if a judge imposes the death penalty after a jury voted for life are extremely high.

Those who gnash their teeth and wish he'd be killed asap have simply never visited a Florida State Prison and probably also have zero awareness of what the conditions on death row consist of.

I'm not voicing a personal favorite here... I'm more than aware that a lot of people could use a pistol ball in their head-- yesterday-- but then again: the conditions at FSP - Raiford and the Union Correctional Institution (two of our three prisons that feature a death row) are such that a lot of inmates commit suicide just to GTFO of there.

And those are just lifers. The death row guys are under even greater constrictions. These conditions are so closely monitored that we've never had a death row inmate successfully commit suicide-- though more than one has tried.

One guy, Ted Herring, was on death row for decades. His appeal kept him out of the chamber, but some years ago it was observed that his mentality had eroded to such an extent (not much stimulus to be had in a death row cell in Florida-- you don't even have cell mates) that he was effectively functioning mentally as a child of about age 8.

The state wasn't sure if he was pulling a Bug Act just to get off the row, so they sent him to Chattahoochee and the State Hospital for the Criminally Insane to evaluate him.

Having been to Chattahoochee on several occasions in my former official capacity as a deputy sheriff, I will say without hesitation that I'd rather do my time on death row than to ever let the state's head-shrinkers get their hooks into me... but they kept Ted around for over a year and finally the docs concluded: this was no act. His mind had simply gone to shit after decades on death row, kept in a solo cell for 23 hours per day, and one hour per day on a rec deck for "fresh air and sunshine". All by himself.

No TV or radio. There's a book cart that comes around once a week, but that didn't help Ted because he was illiterate and death row guys don't get to take advantage of state educational freebies, the way convicts who committed less serious offenses do.

You're in The Hole, and it's not even punitive-- it's administrative, and it's forever. No trustees enter death row, and the guards will speak to an inmate as little as possible.

Very lonely way to go. Prison visits are highly restricted and it's just... real, real bad.

I'd rather be executed than to spend more than one year on the row.

--R
 
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TheX

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A sick young man with mental issues and a shitty childhood. He needs to be punished for what he did and he's obviously not safe to allow on the streets, but I don't see how death for him serves any purpose other than retribution. If I were a parent of one of the murdered, I'd probably be looking for retribution too, but I'm not a proponent of the death penalty in general.
If I was given the choice of death, or living in jail in solitude I'm choosing the quick way out.
 

LPMarshall Hack

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If I was given the choice of death, or living in jail in solitude I'm choosing the quick way out.
Still not a quick way out. Takes decades for the state to kill anyone.

The death sentence gets him the best of both worlds. Decades in prison, coupled with the fact that he knows he will be executed one day.
 

Leee

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Why should we pay to keep your ass in jail for the rest of your life..
Right on.
Compare the cost of incarcerating one prisoner for one year to the cost of a public school K-12 education for one child.
And maybe throw some community college in there as well.
 

electric head

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They had the right idea

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Give it 10 or 20 years and they will not be keeping people in jail for their lifetime..
Wont be able to afford it..
 

Roberteaux

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Another bit of Florida's law in re: death penalty cases, is that they're all automatically reviewed by the Florida Supreme Court.

Sometimes, the Supremes will find improprieties in the trial's procedures and will invalidate the entire proceeding. At other times, they stand mute and it will be the convict's attorney (usually the public defender's office) who will ask the appellate court (below the Supreme Court) to issue a writ of certiorari so as to review the case.

Sometimes it takes years for any of the higher courts to determine to take some action other than to give both the state attorney's office and the public defender's office a considerable amount of time to get their act together well enough that the court can make a decision... or send the case back to be re-tried... or whatever.

The guy I wrote of above, Ted Herring, was on death row from 1982 until about 2012, when he was sent off to be evaluated psychologically. Another one of our laws is that a convict has to be mentally competent to participate in his or her defense, and must also understand the nature and quality of the acts for which they're to be executed.

So, when the shrinks realized that Ted wasn't acting and really had eroded to such a significant extent as was the case-- and that he really was toast upstairs-- they not only took him off death row, but they even put him in a medium security camp and made him a trustee.

He was basically a groundskeeper there-- he mowed lawns, planted flowers and trees, painted things that needed paint.

He did a couple of years at FCI Calhoun as a trustee, minimum security, but when I looked to see what's up with him a moment ago, I saw that he'd been transferred to FCI Sumter... which is a state prison for juvies who manage to rate state time. That place is typically referred to as a "gladiator school" type of prison, but it's for sure that Ted isn't exposed to the kind of young jitterbugs who end up in Sumter. Instead, he's one of the old trustees who has absolutely no intention of escaping and who lives in a dorm outside the fences of the max-security compound.

Such a curious fate. :hmm:

***************​

You know how he avoided the death chamber? It was just like this: his attorney was a public defender named Howard Pearl. Howard was one of two litigators from the state PD's office who handled capital felonies in Florida's 7th Circuit Courts.

Because of this, one time Howard ended up with a razor held to his throat by the guy he was defending, who meant to use him as a hostage during an escape.

Howard wasn't hurt; a bailiff came up behind the defendant and popped him with a .38 revolver. So he kinda got the death penalty anyway.

But after that, Howard wanted to be able to carry concealed weapons in court. But, the law is that you gotta be a certified Florida cop to do that legally. Meanwhile, there's Howard trying to defend assholes like Gerald Stano, who murdered about 26 women over the years.

Howard managed to get the Sheriff of Marion County to certify him as an "inactive reserve deputy sheriff", so now Howard could carry a .44 Special Bulldog concealed in court while also never having to do the first bit of police work.

BUT, after Mr. Herring was convicted and sentenced to death by the jury, the public defender's office in Tallahassee filed for a writ of certiorari because for Ted Herring to be represented by an attorney who was also an "inactive reserve deputy sheriff" was, in their opinion, a gross conflict of interests.

Pretty weird. But, it kept Ted out of the hot seat and also the big I.V. needles out of his veins just long enough for his mind to become... rubble.

Strange case, all the way around.

--R :dunno:
 
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Leee

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ABC News indicated his attorneys pointed out “failures in his upbringing.”

CNN noted that Cruz’s lawyers asked “jurors to spare the life of [Cruz],” asking them not to make decisions based on emotion.


I would make the argument that emotions are what prevent the death penalty from being carried out, swiftly and surely.
 

pnuggett

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A while back I heard a bunch of noise that the drugs used to kill a man who had been given the death penalty took too long to work. Whole bunch of folks were outraged at the cruelty. I don't remember all of the facts but he had been on death row about thirty years before they actually carried out the sentence. Took too long to die? Yep, about thirty years too long.
 

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