NGD...with issues "ski jump"

burke

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2012
Messages
581
Reaction score
632
I bought a Ibanez Artcore AG95 VLS off a buddy who looking to raise funds for an other piece of gear. Looks great, his action is set a bit high for me so after I got it home I set up up to my preference and noticed that it has a slight "ski jump" thus fretting out above the 14th fret.
Im going to keep it in my humidified room for a while to see if it was just a humidity problem. I don't think there is much you can do to fix it, maybe a fret leveling to shorten the higher frets, but then weighing the value of the guitar and the cost of the fret job...I got it cheap enough, but still.
 

jkes01

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2011
Messages
3,442
Reaction score
2,821
I bought a Ibanez Artcore AG95 VLS off a buddy who looking to raise funds for an other piece of gear. Looks great, his action is set a bit high for me so after I got it home I set up up to my preference and noticed that it has a slight "ski jump" thus fretting out above the 14th fret.
Im going to keep it in my humidified room for a while to see if it was just a humidity problem. I don't think there is much you can do to fix it, maybe a fret leveling to shorten the higher frets, but then weighing the value of the guitar and the cost of the fret job...I got it cheap enough, but still.
Put a straight edge down the center of the fretboard, helps to back light it so you can see what the entire fretboard is doing. Adjusting the neck might also help.

I recently encountered this issue on a Strat. My options were to add fallaway during fret leveling and crowning or refret the neck and sand the neck perfectly smooth and install new frets.

Since this was just a Mex Strat and not a vintage instrument, we opted for adding fallaway. I also cut a new bone nut it. The action was still a bit high for my liking, but it played perfectly up and down the neck. Light gauge strings also helped.

If it were mine, I would have refret it, but for him it would be cheaper to get another neck if he wanted the action any lower.

He’s playing it now and says it’s fine, but am gonna order a couple of necks just in case.

I know this is different than your situation because of the semi hollow, but feel the extra fallaway couldn’t hurt. You could also do a partial refret, but that would depend on cost.

Humidity control could have an affect. I’d be interested to know the outcome. Maybe measure the string height now and in a week or so in the humidity controlled room.

Good luck and let us know how it works out.
 

burke

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2012
Messages
581
Reaction score
632
I took it to my fret guy, he looks at it and says "well, it will look nice as a wall hanger." So at this point un less I can deal with the action being high I have a beautiful body piece of garbage.
I told my buddy about it he swears he never noticed, I do believe him cause all his guitars have high actions in my opinion. Oh well, lesson learned.
 

Roxy13

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2017
Messages
8,350
Reaction score
23,253
Hmm. Generally just doing a fallaway has always helped on my guitars when they've had that issue. I wouldn't consider it garbage yet if it were mine.

Of course I would check the whole fretboard first and if it all needs leveling do that and then the fallaway and dress all the frets then.
 

charlie chitlins

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Messages
3,595
Reaction score
3,461
Well...if it's a wall hanging, you have nothing to lose. Level the last frets until it works. If they're too small to use when you're done, they're the frets over the body that you don't use much anyway.
How about a pic of the fretboard from the side, where it goes over the body, so we can see how serious it is?
You could also pull those last frets and level the fingerboard. It's not hard.
The biggest problem is that there's probably something structural that's causing the guitar to fold up.
 

smk506

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2009
Messages
4,319
Reaction score
7,877
Without seeing I can only suggest shopping around for a new fret guy. More than a few out there that will look at a job they can’t or don’t want to do and declare it impossible.
 

integra evan

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2007
Messages
2,857
Reaction score
3,360
Here I was expecting to come in here and see pictures of Lillehammer
 

moreles

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2011
Messages
4,294
Reaction score
3,014
Sadly, the standard truss rod adjustment doas not always compensate for what an individual neck may actually be doing, and then it's a matter of shimming (bolt-on), tweaking a few frets or a section of the neck, levelling the frets, maybe leveling the board and re-fretting. I gradually learned to do all these things and have only been defeated by one neck, lifteime (and that was a twisted one) but it can get pretty labor-intensive, challenging, and just plain annoying to do. I like to gain experience via practice, so it's worth it for me to do these projects, but for most people the time and $$$ relative to the value of the guitar can make it a waste. As others have said, have another guy look at it. I've encountered relatively few techs who can or even want to take on a challenge like this, because it can become a money pit and not all that many are good at it to begin with.
 

LeslieFan

Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2018
Messages
98
Reaction score
150
Some good reading here.https://www.talkbass.com/threads/getting-the-facts-about-ski-jumps.1111265/
 


Latest Threads



Top