[NGD & QUESTION] 2004 Standard with lopsided tailpiece

Tim Bridge

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Hi all,

I wanted to share my latest attempt to find my first LP. Pics attached. it's been great so far and I plan to put the pick guard on permanently as long as the tailpiece isn't a huge issue. The bridge is _very_ lopsided by my naive eye -- but I'm not sure if it's a big deal, a little deal, or not a deal at all?

To me, this would indicate a twisted neck and the neck is a bit twisted but I've seen much worse in my search for my first LP (I had to send one back to a reverb seller for a twisted neck and the tailpiece had the same issue. However, _that_ was a mint 2018 that I knew _for sure_ that I was going to sell eventually, so I couldn't abide anything that might prevent my flipping it in the future ( or lower its value ).

I love the way it sounds and feels, I've adjusted the bridge a bit for a bit higher action as is my preference and at this point I do not ever plan to sell it... so even if the neck is twisted it a bit, unless you guys tell me "NO NO NO, SEND IT BACK!", I'm going to keep it.

Just wanted to share my new lady and get your expert opinions on the tailpiece issue.

Thanks for reading.
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Tim Bridge

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Wow, what a coincidence! I was watching the Gibson USA Factory Tour on youtube tonight and, during the final assembly and cleaning segment, I noticed that one of the LPs on the table had a very similar tailpiece slant... (Screenshot attached)
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Does this mean it's "normal"?
 

VDeuce

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It's usually done that way to get away from having the strings hit the back of the bridge on their way to the tailpiece.

You can try restringing with the tailpiece studs lowered (decked) and top-wrap the strings. That will allow strings to not hit bridge and lowers the TP all the way.

Do a search here for topwrap or top wrap - you'll get loads of opinions and pics.
 

Tim Bridge

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It's usually done that way to get away from having the strings hit the back of the bridge on their way to the tailpiece.

You can try restringing with the tailpiece studs lowered (decked) and top-wrap the strings. That will allow strings to not hit bridge and lowers the TP all the way.

Do a search here for topwrap or top wrap - you'll get loads of opinions and pics.
I see! Very interesting. Thanks for the info.
 

lpfan1980

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Hi all,

I wanted to share my latest attempt to find my first LP. Pics attached. it's been great so far and I plan to put the pick guard on permanently as long as the tailpiece isn't a huge issue. The bridge is _very_ lopsided by my naive eye -- but I'm not sure if it's a big deal, a little deal, or not a deal at all?

To me, this would indicate a twisted neck and the neck is a bit twisted but I've seen much worse in my search for my first LP (I had to send one back to a reverb seller for a twisted neck and the tailpiece had the same issue. However, _that_ was a mint 2018 that I knew _for sure_ that I was going to sell eventually, so I couldn't abide anything that might prevent my flipping it in the future ( or lower its value ).

I love the way it sounds and feels, I've adjusted the bridge a bit for a bit higher action as is my preference and at this point I do not ever plan to sell it... so even if the neck is twisted it a bit, unless you guys tell me "NO NO NO, SEND IT BACK!", I'm going to keep it.

Just wanted to share my new lady and get your expert opinions on the tailpiece issue.

Thanks for reading.
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It is SLIGHTLY lopsided but you said its a good player call It Loppy and have fun!!! Be concerned though of it puts any structural strain on the neck or body though.:hmm:.
 

MSB

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guitars have threads and are adjustable for a reason :p. Deck it and top wrap... you can thank me in the morning.

I've owned at least 50 Gibson LPs and probably another 25-30 Gibsons of other sorts and I've yet to run across one I (or anyone else that has had their hands on it, whether it be a friend or various luthiers) would write off with a twisted neck. I know they exist, but damn, dude.
 

Tim Bridge

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guitars have threads and are adjustable for a reason :p. Deck it and top wrap... you can thank me in the morning.

I've owned at least 50 Gibson LPs and probably another 25-30 Gibsons of other sorts and I've yet to run across one I (or anyone else that has had their hands on it, whether it be a friend or various luthiers) would write off with a twisted neck. I know they exist, but damn, dude.
Yes. Slam it. Top wrap.
Top wrap, eh? I didn't consider that as an option. I don't mind the lopsided TP as long as it's not doing any damage :D but I'll have to watch a bunch of videos on the pros/cons of top wrapping.

As for sending my previous 2018 Standard back due to neck twist -- maybe I was being too picky and unaware of the 'standards' for an LP -- but at this price point, I felt justified. If it was a $500 instrument, hey, no problem. For this kind of coin, though, I don't want a twisted neck on an instrument that I knew I was planning to sell eventually. Thanks for the advice, though. It's great to know.
 

MSB

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hey's its your money, do with it as you like, but its still wood. Each guitar is a sum of its parts and no two are exactly alike. My LP with the lowest action has the highest bridge, so there is no equation to the "perfect" guitar, even if there was, as players, we're all different. Play enough and you'll find what you like and don't like and you'll realize some stuff is minor and some are deal breakers. I sold my first LP because it had fret buzz even after changing to new strings (Doh!). I didn't know shit about setups or anything really. But, that's all part of the fun. Hang out here long enough and you'll learn new stuff everyday.
 

Guitpicky

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Your tailpiece is adjustable and it looks like that's all it needs. It looks a little high on the low E side. The slant should match your bridge and action height... a little lower on the high E side and a little higher on the low E side.

Top wrapping is fine if you know all the options and still choose to. Know that it's an alternative option and has its drawbacks. I'm guessing you don't even know what top wrapping is and as such the suggestion is not answering your question or helping you in any way.

They're only taking advantage of your naivety to rekindle a debate that's been done to death ad nauseam. Shame on them for using your question to resurrect a dead horse just to beat it to death again :)
 

Guitpicky

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Watch a bunch of YT videos on on guitar and specifically LP setups. Don't miss the one with Joe Walsh. Once you see what it entails you'll pretty much know if you're going to be comfortable doing it yourself. If you're not, it'd be worth getting a professional setup :)
 

Dilver

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That just looks like a stupidly bad set up. If you’re not comfortable doing it yourself, bring it to a good tech and get it set up properly. Your instincts are correct - it’s totally off and there’s no reason a well made guitar should require a tailpiece set up like that.
 

Liquid State

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Also - any play ability issues with a twisted neck (string height, buzzing, fretting out when bending etc...) and remedies would be confined to the area between the nut <--> bridge. Once the strings cross the bridge it doesn't matter to the frets at all what the tail piece is doing (unless for some insane reason it's higher than the bridge - which isn't the case here.)

if the relief can be set in conjunction with a bridge height that gets you a string height (action) you like without any string buzz up and down the neck, you are good to go.

I have a Heritage 535 with a the slightest bit of neck twist (the relief ends up a hair flatter on the high -E side). When I set it up right it doesn't cause any issues and I love the way it plays.
 

viking20

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Very common for necks to have less relief on the treble side.
OP , apart from the strings hitting the back of the bridge the angle of the tailpiece doesn't matter. If the BRIDGE leans dramatically in order for the setup to be decent , that's another thing , IMO
The neck angle on Gibson's can vary quite a bit , some will have the bridge much higher over the body than others.
I would also suggest decking the tailpiece , and topwrapping the strings.
 

scozz

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I deck my tailpiece and topwrap all my Les Pauls, been doing that for,...ummm 20 years or so! I prefer my tailpiece decked, I rest my hand on it and it’s more comfortable. To avoid the strings hitting the back of the bridge, I topwrap.

I also like the string angle over the bridge that’s a result of topwrapping. It’s a shallow angle that I prefer,....compared to the steep angle regular stringing provides.


 

scozz

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Another advantage to topwrapping is it removes the possibility of bridge collapse. You’d be surprised how many bridges I’ve seen that have collapsed under the pressure of having a low tailpiece and not topwrapping.

I’m NOT talking about a bridge completely collapsing under the weight of the pressure, I’m talking about a slight collapse. In most cases it’s so slight it hard to even notice, until you start getting some string buzz, or intonation problems, or tuning problems or other things.

When the radius of the bridge loses its integrity many problems may occur. Some of you may already have a collapsed bridge and not even realize it!

Topwrapping will virtually eliminate the possibility of this problem.
 

Christosterone

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Plek + inexperienced line operator...

I’ve had at least 3 of those...

The annoying ones are when the intonation is perfect but the bridge is crazily angled...

-Chris
 

matttornado

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Just adjust it so it level if it bothers you. No big deal. Check the bridge. If the bridge is slanted to allow for proper string height, then the tailpiece is most likely adjusted to match the bridge's profile.

And like mentioned above, you want the strings to not touch the bridge on the back angle so it might not be level in order to allow for that. The low E side will be raised higher than the high E side when allowing for the string clearence.
 


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