NGD: Picked up a weird birth-year Les Paul - '84 Studio Standard

Rumzdizzle

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Been wanting a cool guitar from my birth-year... unfortunately not the best year to buy your iconic guitars. Seems like the Strats and LPs were going through a weird phase those years, however I set up a Reverb Alert for "1984 Gibson." I see this guy pop up and think thats pretty cool, I love a good tobacco burst but don't know too much about Studio Standards. Thought to my self, not gonna spend money on some random guitar that I don't get to play IRL, especially when it s a well-used iteration I never heard of... then I read the description and see that it is in a near-by suburb, what are the chances of that. I dip out of work a bit early on a Friday and drive straight to the store after calling the owner., he said that he already got 4 offers in the hour it was posted but he will let me check out before responding to them.

I get there and it is a bit more worn then I expected, has a bit of a smoky bar smell to it too, but man is it a smooth player. OG pickups and most parts minus the tuners (one broken and they replaced with copies that did not require drilling, OG tuners included in case). Studio standards are an 1/8th of an inch thinner than standards and this one weighs in at a very manageable 8lbs 12 ozs. I mulled it over for a while and after a few back and fourths on price, I put this guy in its OG near perfect chainsaw case and take it home.

Would love to hear from any others who have a Studio Standard or Custom from this era too. May still be in the honeymoon phase but love the quirks of this guy. Also alder body and maple neck I believe, weird right?


A lil demo with a new pedal I got this weekend too...

 

jenton70

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I used one of these for many years in the late 80's early 90's and played all over with it. Reliable and great sounding guitar. I wish I had mine back but sold it for rent or something stupid back then.
 

smk506

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1. That’s a bad ass ‘84! I like that version of the studio, you get all the binding and the dot neck is a unique feature from the time.

2. Great playing!
 

Rumzdizzle

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I used one of these for many years in the late 80's early 90's and played all over with it. Reliable and great sounding guitar. I wish I had mine back but sold it for rent or something stupid back then.
The shop owner bought it off of the original owner who gigged it pretty regularly. If this guitar could talk, it'd prob have some cool stories.
 

DarrellV

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Nice find!

There are a few in here too.

FTR the 80's were considered by some folks to be a like a mini 'Renascence' at Gibson.

Out of this period came the first real efforts to start building them the way they used to after the general decline in quality attributed to Norlin ownership cost cutting.

A lot of experimental and one off stuff was made in this period, some good, some... well... let's just say even the ugly ducklings have their fans!
:laugh2:

I'm a proud owner of an 82 so maybe I'm a little prejudiced.. :naughty:

But I did a ton of research on this period while I was finding out about my own.

That's what led me here in the end.

That's a unique bird, most likely will never be made again.

The original Gibson pickups should be Shaws for that period and are also desirable by a lot of folks.

If you have some :photos:of the pickups front and back we could confirm that for ya!:thumb:

Free of charge! :cool2:
 

Rumzdizzle

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Nice find!

There are a few in here too.

FTR the 80's were considered by some folks to be a like a mini 'Renascence' at Gibson.

Out of this period came the first real efforts to start building them the way they used to after the general decline in quality attributed to Norlin ownership cost cutting.

A lot of experimental and one off stuff was made in this period, some good, some... well... let's just say even the ugly ducklings have their fans!
:laugh2:

I'm a proud owner of an 82 so maybe I'm a little prejudiced.. :naughty:

But I did a ton of research on this period while I was finding out about my own.

That's what led me here in the end.

That's a unique bird, most likely will never be made again.

The original Gibson pickups should be Shaws for that period and are also desirable by a lot of folks.

If you have some :photos:of the pickups front and back we could confirm that for ya!:thumb:

Free of charge! :cool2:
Pretty sure they are the originals, still have the patent stickers on the pickup rings.

 

Rumzdizzle

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Nice! Those should be Shaws then.. The mid 80's saw a switch to putting a label on the ring.

Early 80's have a date stamp on the back.

Back of mine, for example.

They really do sound amazing. I also have a Heritage H-150 Standard and it’s such a solid guitar but for whatever reason I just don’t like the Duncan’s it came with it. This guitar sounds like a Gibson.
 

DarrellV

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They really do sound amazing. I also have a Heritage H-150 Standard and it’s such a solid guitar but for whatever reason I just don’t like the Duncan’s it came with it. This guitar sounds like a Gibson.
A pickup swap could be in your future. No denying those boys at Heritage know how to build 'em.

Any pics of the Heritage? :drool:
 


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