NGD: LP Traditional 2017 (Advice: Should I touch up?)

Michael M.

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Well after 2 months of hunting and research I finally picked out an arch top Les Paul. Most of the LPs I tried felt too skinny or too fat - the one I really loved was a 1986 pre-historic ‘57 which I learned had a middle of the road “medium C” neck like most standards of the time. But the guy wanted $5,500.
I then stumbled upon the 2017 Traditional which was described as having a thinner neck than previous years. One reviewer described it as “between the 50s and 60s neck.”
That’s for me!
Most were priced around the same as other Standards and Traditionals I found ($1,700 - $2,000). This one was a few hundreds less and online. So I rolled the dice and I think I won as it looks and feels fantastic.
In a dark room it has a nice subtle burst - in a bright room it loses the burst snd looks uniform in color like a Slash model.
One flaw - whoever had this before must have been into either big spiked heavy metal belts - or maybe a cowboy with a huge belt buckle as the back is ripped up. The back has rash but on edge of body it is torn down to the mahogany. (I don’t know how this could have happened - probably playing standing up - the buckle gashed the edge.)

Should I leave it alone?
Should I put a few drops of lacquer finish on it? If yes, what kind and how? Brush? Spray?

Gonna get her a poker chip and blank truss rod cover and eventually build up nerve fit pickguard installation.
Here are some pics!!!
Michael
 

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Injector

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Bucklerash is common on used guitars. It's up to you whether you want to accept it. If bought online you have a cooling off period whether the buyer states no returns or not. Was this damage not disclosed?

A good luthier or furniture repairer could make it look much better or even make it disappear altogether but it would obviously cost you. Most would leave it alone and call it 'mojo'.
 

dmac in SC

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I don't see a damned thing wrong with that guitar. Let it roll! And unless you are an elbow strummer (which I seriously doubt), ditch the pick guard too.

Great find , man. Outstanding.
 

Michael M.

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Bucklerash is common on used guitars. It's up to you whether you want to accept it. If bought online you have a cooling off period whether the buyer states no returns or not. Was this damage not disclosed?
I could see that it was pretty scratched up from pictures - but I didn't care considering price and beauty. Looking looking for super clean - just a guitar that looks, sounds, and plays great.
While I saw pics of the many scratches I don't think I saw the deep chips to wood.
Honestly, still don't care - I really like the guitar.
I don't even care enough to go to a luthier but wondering if it was worth buying a bottle of something from StewMac to drip on it. Or . . . just forget it. :cool:
 

JeffH66

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I would put the poker chip and pick guard on that thing, it will look fabulous. The only reason I would touch up that area is if it is sharp, catching on clothes while you play or something or if it starts to swell or get larger (expand or crack). Then you can have someone sand if smooth and touch up the lacquer. Otherwise, it’s a guitar that has been loved and played, and generally only kick ass sounding guitars get played like that.

congrats.
 

Dogbreath

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Anything you can do to make that area better will only make it worse. As a woodworker, and if it were my guitar, I would get some artist linseed oil from a craft store and rub a small amount onto the damaged area. Let it soak in for a few minutes then rub kit off with a soft cloth. Don’t let it pool up, and make sure you completely remove any trace from the lacquer finish. Let it dry for a few days and repeat the process about three times. You can play it while the oil sets. The artist linseed oil is a drying oil and is a natural varnish. It will dry to a soft sheen and seal the exposed wood. It will look completely natural, like vintage wear.
 

Michael M.

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Arggggg!
I gotta admit something.
I played it through my ‘67 Bassman last night.
A/B’ed it with my ‘96 Special with Sanford Magnetics P-90s (Model 9022).
The Special blew the new Traditional out of the water.
Starting to wonder:
Do I invest in new pickups?
Did I really chase a obsession with this arch top model that was unnecessary (I’ve had bad OCD about picking one up). Maybe it is not needed and a fat Gretsch would bring more diversity. But maybe the right pickups would change things as it is really comfortable.
Ugggg.
I know only I can decide but damn.
 

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1all's Pub

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Man, what a great vintage looking top! Great honey burst color too. As for the wear, personal choice of course, but trying to fix it may make it look even worse, as it is it just looks like a cool old worn LP. And if you do decide to fix it I‘d take it to a luthier you trust (unless you are skilled in the area of guitar refinishing/repair).
 

monstruo_loco

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Several reasons why I most often buy used guitars (and cars), one of them is until they get dented or scratched I constantly worry about getting that first flaw, then once it’s out of the way I can enjoy it with reckless abandon (but not abuse). Buying used removes that uneasiness right from the get go.
Enjoy your new guitar!
 

afireinside

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Yeah i buy used and cheap. My 2014 traditional was i think $1300 mint and 16 trad was $1500 with one small ding.
 


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