NGD - Epi LP St 06

VGA

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2013
Messages
41
Reaction score
21
Just took a pretty thing home. Serial number says it was manufactured in China in December 2006. It's a cherry burst Epiphone Les Paul Standard. As some may have seen in a previous post, I was planning to strip the paint off and create a custom design, but this thing is beautiful and I won't touch it except to play and make it prettier.

The price was a sweet €100,- It was dirty, bordering on gross. The strings were rusty and there was dust and grease everywhere. The neck broke somewhere in the past and the bridge pickup doesn't work. That explains the price.

I cleaned it and polished and the finish is perfect, except for the neck problem and a bump on the back. The neck has been repaired well and it's solid and the guitar plays well. New strings make the guitar sing and look almost new. The hardware is (now) clean and slightly worn, but nothing to worry about.

Overall, a thing of beauty. I'll open it up soon to see where the pickup fault is. The switch and pots look fine, so it may be the wire to the pickup itself. It did play for a few strums but then it died again. Neck pickup sounds sweet.

Oh, and that thing is heavy! I have a fake Strat and this is at least twice the weight.

Here are a few pics of my new love.
Photo%2022.3.2016%2C%2015%2013%2049.jpg

Photo%2022.3.2016%2C%2014%2038%2016.jpg

Photo%2022.3.2016%2C%2014%2038%2029.jpg

Photo%2022.3.2016%2C%2014%2038%2035.jpg
 

VGA

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2013
Messages
41
Reaction score
21
I'm trying to figure out what type I have. Looking at the 2006 catalogue, it looks like a Standard Plustop, but mine has metal Grover tuners. The one in the catalogue seems to have plastic knobs. My tuners look like the ones on the Custom Plus, except they're chrome rather than gold. The truss rod cover says Les Paul Standard, so it's definitely not a custom.

Serial number is : EE061205650

2006 catalogue...
 

VGA

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2013
Messages
41
Reaction score
21
Wanted to fix the pickup problem. That didn't work, but I may have found one of the reasons Epiphone is less expensive than Gibson. Wiring.

First, I removed the bridge pickup. It works sporadically and wiggling the wire made no difference. So, that is not the problem.

There seemed to be a crackling in the jack. I took it out and saw that the signal and ground are the same wire. Ground woven around the signal wire. Is this cost saving or a shielding thing? Both wires were literally hanging by a thread and I soldered them onto the socket. I think I'll replace the wire completely, but I'm wondering if I should use two wires or a double like Epiphone did.

It also struck me that the compartments are not shielded at all. There is a thin layer of dark paint, but it doesn't cover the holes completely.

The guitar worked for a while, it sounded pretty, but now the bridge pickup has dropped out again. I'm thinking that it must be the switch. Are they prone to failure? Do I need to buy a new one?

And if I'm pulling this thing apart and replacing wires, do you have other recommendations?
 

Kamen_Kaiju

smiling politely as they dream of savage things
V.I.P. Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
85,590
Reaction score
260,063
congrats, HNGD.

hows the intonation? The saddles look kinda high on the three treble strings.
 

JohnnyN

Just another old geezer
Silver Supporting Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
May 15, 2010
Messages
5,513
Reaction score
15,100
Looks like a Heritage Cherry Red Standard Plus Top Pro made at the QingDao factory in China during December 2006. The Standard have been using kidney bean Grovers since 2002.
Les Paul Standard - The Unofficial Epiphone Wiki

Beautiful - great job on cleaning it up:thumb:
Congratulations and enjoy for long :)
 

VGA

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2013
Messages
41
Reaction score
21
Malikon, the saddles were way too high when I bought it. I lowered the bridge when I cleaned the guitar and swapped strings. Four of the strings are perfectly in tune on the 12th fret, but two need very slight adjusting. I'll fine tune the whole thing when electrics issues are solved. The guitar plays like butter, just less greasy. Especially after I cleaned her up. Damn, she was neglected. She must be happy with all the TLC she's getting.

JohnnyN, a Plus Top Pro? So I got the nice pickups? I'd say this guitar was quite a bargain then. If that is the case, then it's a very nice surprise. I did take the bridge pickup out today. Stupidly, I didn't take a photo of it. It had the stamped Epiphone logo and two stickers. I'll take them out tomorrow and take photos. Hopefully that will clear things up.

As for the dead pickup. I found an old thread on this very forum that dealt with bad switches. Many seemed to have been helped by contact spray. I'll try that tomorrow and post the results.

I think I'm falling in love.

Edit: Just checked the Wiki page and the Pro line entered production in 2010 and doesn't seem to include the Cherry. So I'm presuming it's a Plus Top (not Pro).
 

VGA

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2013
Messages
41
Reaction score
21
Just wanted to say, what a beauty. After soldering the wires leading to the jack and using contact spray on the rest of the electronics, she performs perfectly. Both pickups work, no crackle, no dropouts, nothing but the sweet growl of the humbuckers. The knobs and switch are as smooth as can be.

The signal output is a bit lower that my Strat's (if you can call a cheap non-Fender a Strat), but she sounds beautiful.

And does she make heads turn? Everyone that visits my house falls in love. They think I bought a really expensive guitar. I have her on my lap all day. When watching something, I gently play something. I am hardly online, because playing with her is more fun. The neck is perfect, the fretboard is perfect.

Damn, I'm happy I bought this guitar, even if I didn't really need another one.
 

nprenger

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2013
Messages
23
Reaction score
23
Congratulations and HNGD! I have the same model, year, and finish. Different factory, but even the flame pattern looks similar. I have bought three nice electrics since I bought mine new in 2007 including a beautiful Gibson ES-359, but the Epi Les Paul is still the one that I play the most. There is a lot you can do to make them even better if you're interested. They're great guitars stock, too, and an excellent value. You absolutely stole yours. Great find!
 

VGA

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2013
Messages
41
Reaction score
21
Congratulations and HNGD! I have the same model, year, and finish. Different factory, but even the flame pattern looks similar. I have bought three nice electrics since I bought mine new in 2007 including a beautiful Gibson ES-359, but the Epi Les Paul is still the one that I play the most. There is a lot you can do to make them even better if you're interested. They're great guitars stock, too, and an excellent value. You absolutely stole yours. Great find!

Yeah, it was dirt cheap. A third of the price of anything else in the same league. Only min point now is the broken neck, but as I said earlier, it was repaired well and you only see if you look closely. It doesn't affect the playability at all.

And yes, I may want to modify her in the future. No rush, I'll get to know her as she is first. But different pickups and pots may be a thing somewhere in the future. She is definitely a keeper.
 

notjoeaverage

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
554
Reaction score
376
HNGD and welcome to the world of improving your Epi.

For the most part the switches and jacks wear out pretty quick and you're already well aware of the "quality" of the wire itself.

The way I have found to keep costs down is to first replace the complete wiring harness, the switch and the jack. Now you have a good foundation to make changes based on good info and not using guess work with an inferior signal chain.

Play it for a while and get used to the way the pups sound, if you notice any harshness get a pair of Russian PIO caps usually a couple bucks each, that will normally smooth out any harshness.

If you keep your volume and tone dimed almost all the time the stock pots should be fine unless they develop a fault or are so scratchy that even contact cleaner doesn't help. If you change your pots spend the extra money for 10, 7 or 5% tolerance and 525 or 550 ohms. If a pot doesn't specifically state it's tolerance then it is 20% tolerance and can be anywhere from 400 to 600 ohms.

Usually by this time your guitar should sound good enough when paired with a good amp and speakers that you shouldn't need to change your pups unless the sound is nowhere near the style of music you like to play.

I've gone through this with most of mine and haven't changed any pups yet, the Alnico Classics and the ProBuckers do the job fine, even the el cheapo ceramics in my Special II sounded fine after just a cap swap. I do have a set of Burstbuckers just in case.

Too many guys keep chasing the "right" pups without doing anything to make sure the rubber will hit the road. It's like putting a 600HP engine into a stock old Chevy Vega without putting in a cage and ladder bars and a pair of slicks and a bullet proof tranny and rear end. Put it on the start line and all you'll be able to do when the light turns green is melt the radial tires while you twist the body. YMMV
 

Latest Threads



Top