NGD: E.LP 130 LTS/RE Vs GIBSON LP Standard

dsmcl77

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Hi,

It has been a while that I wanted a Lester with set neck long tenon.
Gibson is too expensive and furthermore the long tenon.

Having a few Japanese, I so went to look for a Tokai, Burny, Greco, Orville BG, but none of them had all the requirements:
One piece un-chambered body, long tenon, neck bigger than the 60' profile, but not 50' (a 59' then?), figured maple top (I have a plain top) and an acceptable price.

Many transition style tenon (Tokai, Greco), many 2/3 pieces body (Greco, Orville) and wire routing wrong.... US get sometime crazy on prices, Japan, with delivery and custom fee, makes it less attractive. France? not much choice.

After many weeks of search & research, I finally decided to go for an Edwards E-LP 105 and above.
I seems they are (were?) made in China (a first for me) but with the quality control of ESP, well renowned for the quality of their guitars.

I was lucky to find a 2008 e-lp130 in Colchester for 500 GBP, with post that makes it for 730 EUR / USD915. Which seems like a good price for me.
I is a reliced finished. didn't like relic job usually, but this one doesn't look too "fake", well nearly, more on that later.

And here she is now


Nice tobacco sunburst top...

Yellow perloid logo inlay.
Notice that there is probably no headstock veneer like on the real deal.


On the next post, I will compare this beauty with my real Gibson and will tell you what I feel about them both.

Just for you to know, my 1993 Gibson Les Paul Standard is a great one and it is the only one "that put a smile on my face". She is according to other guitarists a great sounding Gibby, I have been asked if she was for sale many time.

The Edwards should have a hard time to beat my girl...
 

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dsmcl77

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Voilà the two opponent:

The cat is there just in case of more relicing needed on the Eddy...


First the headstock: Well, nothing beat the Gibson Les paul (exept the 2015 :naughty:)

I do no like the truss rod cover of the Eddy, but I have an idea of what can be done. more of the upgrading later.

Nut is corian on the Gibby, bone on the Eddy.

The head do not have the same angle, the Eddy being closer to the Orville/Epiphone.



We can see the veneer on the Gibby, missing on the Eddy.
Also, the truss rod cover is thicker on the Gibby.
Actually, all plastics are thicker on the Gibby, price need to be justifed somehow.
Also the tuning pegs looks stronger on the Gibby (bigger washer).
 

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dsmcl77

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Now the Neck:


On the ESP website, the spec is 59' profile, but I know that the real 59' is closer to the 50', on the Eddy it is closer to the 60':

First fret:
ED: 7.3cm/2.874in GIB: 7.2cm/2.834in
12th fret:
ED: 8.7cm/3.425in GIB: 8.5cm/3.346in

The rosewood is lighter on the Eddy, but the Gibby had so many lemon oil and linseed oil on it that it can make a difference

Frets are square and high on the gibby and smaller, the Eddy's are round medium jumbo and rounded.
No fret edge binding on the Eddy, doesn't bother me after all, thought it would.

The Eddy's neck is a pleasure to play, easier than the Gibby, but still with a Les Paul Feeling. I feel at home with it, your brain want you to play Slash and Page right away:slash:
Now the finish:
BAD BAD job on the Gibby
Just look at the inlays...:shock: and the defect :wtf:



On the contrary, Eddy is spotless and near perfect...Chinese you said?
I only saw this type of finish on a Custom Shop Slash Signature I had the chance to have for a few days at home
Picture here (last on page):http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/gibson-les-pauls/303205-your-first-les-paul-when-3.html#post6244941


 

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dsmcl77

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More on the fret and binding job, notice the binding is bigger on the Eddy


The bodys are of the same thickness, but a little wider on the Eddy.
The shape of the Eddy is more like 59 LP, meaning it has a scoop carve near the edge binding, but both are rounded near the pups (59 are flat)




Mounting ring look better on the Eddy, flat to the pups.
 

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DEMENTED

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Great comparison, and I find that I agree with your findings. Edwards are a great value no matter where they are made.
 

dsmcl77

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BTW:
Eddy weight 3.7kg/8.2lbs
Gibby weight 4.3kg/9.8lbs

The Edwards sound louder and rounder when played unplugged.
The Les Paul is somewhat "dryer" and tighter in sound.

The jack plate, plastic on Eddy, metal on Gibby.

Both side by side:
The gain is in the same direction, the Eddy a bit off center.
That way both reflect more treble if the grain was turn the other way around there would be more bass. (a tip from Gil Yaron)




The grain show more on the Eddy, it seems like there is less pore filler and coloring.
The finish is satin on Eddy, shiny on Gibby.

If I prefer the shinyness (???) of the Gibby, the Eddy has a better feel on the fingers.
 

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dsmcl77

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More on the grain showing on the Eddy.


Compare to the Gibby... pore filler again?


The back of the Eddy looks more like the picture of the '58 & '59 pictures in the beauty of the burst book (but I know it is not one, don't get me wrong).


The Gibby looks more like the 1960 LP's (no flash, too shiny)


The relicing on the Eddy is soft and well made, but :doh:they did spray the final laquer on top of it :wtf: that is weard.

All in All, there is a great job on the Eddy, beautiful finish,the guitar is handling very well and no disappointment at all.

The sound unplugged is more pleasant that the Gibson.

It is bed time for me now.
I'll be back from a business trip in two days.

I will then show the inside of the beasts and talk about the sound plugged.

Until then...
 

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Mosster47

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My Edwards (MIJ) is so freaking loud acoustically!!! Usually I'll play on the other side of the couch with one of my Gibby's while we watch tv and it doesn't bother her.

The first time I tried that with my Eddy I got the "Go put that f*$^#%& thing back in your room" look.

As far as playability it's right up there with any guitar I've ever had my hands on from any brand. They are a tremendous value. I don't like to hold them in the same regard as a Gibson, Tokai Premium, or a Navigator because that's not really what they are meant to be. They are just a great player at a great price range.
 

dsmcl77

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Great comparison, and I find that I agree with your findings. Edwards are a great value no matter where they are made.
Thx, they are indeed as I found out only yesterday.:applause:

I am amazed by the quality and the sound of it. :slash:
Both Seymour Duncan Antiquity are great pups.

But all that is for Wednesday...:D
 

Shackenb

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Happy NGD! The 130 was my first japanese branded Lester... Let here go for a vintage super real Greco, but she was very good... The price you paid is very nice!
 

Whoopysnorp

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Do you know what year your Edwards is? Apparently they were only made in China for a brief period.
 

jimmyjames

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Happy NGD! The 130 was my first japanese branded Lester... Let here go for a vintage super real Greco, but she was very good... The price you paid is very nice!
Still got the Super Real? Which model?
 

Shackenb

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Still got the Super Real? Which model?
Hi,

yes did not't sell her again :naughty: (modded with CTS Tvts and Pio Caps), it is a 81 EGF 850 with the PU-2 which are very nice with the mods and a 15nF Neck Cap.... . It is not better than the Edwards, nearly equal quality, but different instrument with a different character... I think the Greco, the Edwards and the japanese Epi LQ I own was on the same level...

Cheers Stefan
 

dsmcl77

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Do you know what year your Edwards is? Apparently they were only made in China for a brief period.
Made in 2008.

Don't know if it is Chinese or Japanese made, all I know is that it is a serious work.:thumb: better than my (still) beloved Gibson.
 

dsmcl77

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Din't had time to take more picture... so that's for later.

What about he sound now?

For this exercise, I used a VOX VT20+ all knobs turned to 12 o'clock.
I do not use this little amp often, that is why I think, I would be more objective than if I used my trusty all tube amp that would bias (no pun intended here) my judgement, being use to that sound with my Gibson Les Paul.
I was seating in front of it, and so my ears and the guitars were standing at the same position to the amp, all the time.

1993 GIBSON LES PAUL STANDARD
50's wiring style

Neck:
490R
Wax potted
Alnico II bar magnet
Output 7.4k

Bridge:
498T
Wax potted
Alnico V bar magnet
Output 9k

EDWARDS E-LP 13 LTS/RE
modern wiring style

Neck:
Seymour Duncan Antiquity
NOT wax-potted
Alnico II magnet
Output 7.8k

Bridge:
Seymour Duncan Antiquity
Alnico II magnet
NOT wax potted
Output 8.52k

The Gibby have definitely more power, neck bringing round and "watery" sound and bridge meaty and pushing toward the mids and higher end.
The amp was crunching faster and it was pushing the overdrive into distortion.

The Eddy have also some punch, but is somewhat dryer and "vintage like". You'll need to work a bit more on the guitar tone knob to obtain the "woman tone"
I could notice a little more note definition and more balance between all the range of frequency.
To obtain the same level of overdrive the gain need to be pushed on the amp setting.

After testing chords and single notes on each guitars, and without thinking, I was playing more AC/DC and heavy metal stuff (Iron Maiden) with the Gibby. With the Eddy I was going toward The Who, Led Zep and even Pink Floyd stuff...

Sustain goes forever on each guitar, a little edge on the Gibby but it is more due to the note going into a slight feedback.
Both guitars won't be scared by a Parisian walkways solo.

When playing with the Edwards, I really feel like I am playing a Les Paul, which was never the case on other brands.
The fret job on this Eddy makes it even a better pleasure for the finger to slide, in a way, not so much on the Gibson due to the squared frets.

It is obvious that the SD Antiquity is made for classic rock & blues while the 498T & 490R are made for heavier, modern rock. So the comparison is a bit twisted.
 
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dsmcl77

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Even if Antiquity's are great pups, I feel I am missing something.

Having a set of Seymour Duncan Custom Shop Joe Bonamassa, I think that will do the trick.

Here's an article posted by Orpheo on the SD forum comparing both pups:

"In 2011 Joe Bonamassa teamed up with Seymour Duncan to design a pickup set which he could install in other guitars so that he wouldn't have to take his prized 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard on the road. The result is what we know today as the Joe Bonamassa Signature Set. The premise is actually quite neat: a PAF-inspired pickup designed to capture the best tonal features Joe heard in that particular guitar. Seymour Duncan could have used completely different materials for the wire, bobbins and magnet but chose to start with materials close to the original. The final product is very PAF-like, no modern edge in the design but very apt to be used in a more modern setting.

The vintage voice of this limited-edition set is what drew me in. The way it was packed is exactly in the tradition of the Seymour Duncan Custom Shop: a small, black box with the pickups inside. A USB stick with digital goodies is included as well, but I was most enthusiastic about Seymour Duncan's and Joe Bonamassa's signature on the bottom of each pickup! I had a guitar with a set of Antiquity humbuckers, so installing the Bonamassas instead of the Antiquities would give me a unique opportunity to hear these two PAF-inspired pickups.
The Antiquities are of course true replicas of a set Seymour examined, while the Bonamassa set was made to sound like a set Joe has, but the similarities with a true PAF are striking. Also 42 AWG wire, plain enamel isolation, butyrate bobbins, rough-cast magnets (Alnico 3 in the bridge, Alnico 2 in the neck), German silver (nickel silver, as it's more commonly known) baseplate, etc.
But what's the tone like? In short: amazing. Will it make me sound like Joe? Well, no. These pickups are so pure, so clean and true that they offer a great platform for your own tone and your own sound. If you wanna sound like Joe, you'll be needing his amps, his tone, his attack and his effects. These pickups are just a small link in the large chain that makes Joe's sound.
As I mentioned before, I was able to try them out next to the Antiquities. To my ears the differences are like night and day. The Antiquity humbuckers are warm yet clear and a bit bright if you pick a bit harder. The Bonamassa humbuckers are fatter to begin with. Picking harder won't just boost the output but it will compress the tone a bit more. Perhaps moreso than with the Antiquities. The Antiquities won't compress the tone as much.
Of course, the highs remain sweet, the mids have the same push as the Antiquities and the lows still require a tight picking hand in order for the tone to not become mushy. You could play harder styles like metal with these pickups, but they're just amazing for fat, juicy, howling blues leads. The Antiquity neck pickup has a bit less output than the Bonamassa, too, which makes the Bonamassa a bit easier to play on the neck pickup.
I've been playing this pickup for the last ten months and this is one of the very rare moments I don't feel the need to swap out a pickup, a magnet, a pot or anything to make it better.The guitar used to have character: now it has a fiery temperament. If I may say so: it feels like I have the Masters of Old right there under my fingertips, and that's a feeling I've never had before with a guitar."

I'll let you know later what they are like on the Eddy. That should be a great match.
 
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dsmcl77

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Here is some sound samples.

Not me playing, I do not have the material to do it properly, plus I won't play as good as Greg.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEqD-ZKSOZM]ESP/Edwards Les Paul Flame Top Part1 - YouTube[/ame]
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FvCTyuBMGrY]EDWARDS les paul LP130 - YouTube[/ame]
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tl3RkQQGmao]Review Edwards LT130 - YouTube[/ame]
 




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