NGD 2003 LP Classic Ebony and Gold

caloyburger

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So you're the one who snagged it! I was looking for a LP in CME and that Classic caught my eye. Black and gold, classic recipe for a Black Beauty. I gave myself a day or two to think about and then pull the trigger. When I was ready, it was gone! Congrats great LP and great price!
 

integra evan

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So you're the one who snagged it! I was looking for a LP in CME and that Classic caught my eye. Black and gold, classic recipe for a Black Beauty. I gave myself a day or two to think about and then pull the trigger. When I was ready, it was gone! Congrats great LP and great price!
Haha yeah, they had it listed less than a day...I saw it and it immediately made me say oh wow out loud lol...that doesn't happen often. Knew I had to move on it. It's an awesome guitar. Thank you for not pulling the trigger right away lol
 

jstarr823

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Thanks all! Yeah the pickups are quite hot but they do sound great and clean up well. I like the tuxedo look too. When I first saw it I was thinking about putting black plastics on it but I think I'll leave it as is now. I might put some gold pickup covers on it. This is the first Classic I've had too and I'm thoroughly impressed.
Just hoping I can get these scratches out of the top. Kind of annoyed that the seller didn't disclose these scratches or highlight them in pictures

View attachment 432377View attachment 432378
I’d start with 1500 grit sandpaper and work your way up to 5000... then buff & polish.
 
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integra evan

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I’d start with 1500 grit sandpaper and work your way up to 5000... then buff & polish.
I think I'll start with the Eternashine stuff that @PierM mentioned.
I don't want to take sandpaper to it - yet.
Either that or I'll have my luthier see what he can do when he replaces my inlays (I think I'm definitely going to change them out for white/cream ones)
 

jstarr823

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I think I'll start with the Eternashine stuff that @PierM mentioned.
I don't want to take sandpaper to it - yet.
Either that or I'll have my luthier see what he can do when he replaces my inlays (I think I'm definitely going to change them out for white/cream ones)
Right on. I’ve done quite a bit of scratch removal, but I understand your apprehension. Best of luck.
 

PierM

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I think I'll start with the Eternashine stuff that @PierM mentioned.
I don't want to take sandpaper to it - yet.
Either that or I'll have my luthier see what he can do when he replaces my inlays (I think I'm definitely going to change them out for white/cream ones)
Yeah, try with the double blend polish, then you see if you need to go micromesh, but imho you'll be fine with the Eternashine stuff.

Remember to start with the blue bottle (N#2), couple of drops in a microfiber, buff in circles with a good pressure on the finish (don't be worried really, it's totally safe). A minute or two of buffing it's fine for the first bottle, just keep the surface "wet" enough, so add extra drops of the polish if needed. Stop buffing when you see almost no more polish on the finish. Don't go to dry, or the micro particles of the polish they could create swirl marks.

After that you can do the same with the pink bottle (N#1), which is to buff to gloss the surface. Just do the same until you'll see the scratch are gone. Repeat the process if you need.

The secret here is to use a proper pressure while you do small circles against the scratches, if you go pussy, it won't work. Of course don't exaggerate, LOL. You don't want to generate any heat... :D

Be aware there is one of their videos, that while use the correct sequence of blends (blue then pink bottle), the guy says to start with 1 and then 2, which is wrong. ;)

Looking forward to see the results. I've fixed quite a bit of bad scratches with that, most of them on nitro finishes. When doesn't completely kill them, it will reduce to barely visible. :fingersx:

Dunno if you took the complete kit. If you did, the detailer works great, just at the end of everything. Don't use the wax, does just make the guitar sticky as shit. ;)
 

integra evan

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Christosterone

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I do have a bottle of that Meguiar's Ultimate Compound. Was thinking about it but wasn't sure if it was too abrasive for a guitar. Have you used it?
yep....but it’s no joke...
only for whacky bad scratches...twice

worked a treat but it was a while ago...
im far from an expert and it may take off more nitro than is needed long term...

id ask @HardCore Troubadour or @NorlinBlackBeauty or @LtDave32 or some of the experts...

it worked great for me but It may be bad....they’ll know

-Chris
 

LtDave32

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Score on a beauty! These classics were really nice guitars. Congrats! :thumb: :thumb: :beer:

For the scratch, since looks a bit aggressive, you can try with a double compound, like the Eternashine scratch remover. Works really well even on those kind of scratch.
I'd go with what PierM recommends there..

But in addition, it's going to take a lot of buffing. One can use an orbital car buffer with micro-mesh bonnets.

After the scratch remover, you'll have to buff out the whole enchilada uniformly. .
 

NorlinBlackBeauty

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I do have a bottle of that Meguiar's Ultimate Compound. Was thinking about it but wasn't sure if it was too abrasive for a guitar. Have you used it?
yep....but it’s no joke...
only for whacky bad scratches...twice

worked a treat but it was a while ago...
im far from an expert and it may take off more nitro than is needed long term...

id ask @HardCore Troubadour or @NorlinBlackBeauty or @LtDave32 or some of the experts...

it worked great for me but It may be bad....they’ll know

-Chris
Far from an expert on anything, but have a lot of experience using Meguiar's Mirror Glaze line of polishes. I contacted someone at Meguiar's to be sure the Mirror Glaze polishes are silicone free - they are. Mirror Glaze are marketed toward professional body shops. Just call the toll free phone number on the bottles.

Most consumer grade automotive polish products contain silicone.

I wanted to polish the satin finished necks on my two Martin guitars. Gorgeous gloss finish on the bodies, with a satin neck stuck into them. The gloss / satin transition was odd looking.

I got good to excellent results using Mirror Glaze #s 2, 7 & 9 with careful hand application. You will not get a defect free mirror smooth finish from satin, as the wood is not prepped to shine super flat.
 
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NorlinBlackBeauty

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Yeah, try with the double blend polish, then you see if you need to go micromesh, but imho you'll be fine with the Eternashine stuff.

Remember to start with the blue bottle (N#2), couple of drops in a microfiber, buff in circles with a good pressure on the finish (don't be worried really, it's totally safe). A minute or two of buffing it's fine for the first bottle, just keep the surface "wet" enough, so add extra drops of the polish if needed. Stop buffing when you see almost no more polish on the finish. Don't go to dry, or the micro particles of the polish they could create swirl marks.

After that you can do the same with the pink bottle (N#1), which is to buff to gloss the surface. Just do the same until you'll see the scratch are gone. Repeat the process if you need.

The secret here is to use a proper pressure while you do small circles against the scratches, if you go pussy, it won't work. Of course don't exaggerate, LOL. You don't want to generate any heat... :D

Be aware there is one of their videos, that while use the correct sequence of blends (blue then pink bottle), the guy says to start with 1 and then 2, which is wrong. ;)

Looking forward to see the results. I've fixed quite a bit of bad scratches with that, most of them on nitro finishes. When doesn't completely kill them, it will reduce to barely visible. :fingersx:

Dunno if you took the complete kit. If you did, the detailer works great, just at the end of everything. Don't use the wax, does just make the guitar sticky as shit. ;)
I'll largely agree here. I have had consistent good results with simple 100% cotton cloth. Some 'microfiber' is largely synthetic (plastic) and can leave ultra fine scratches. As with car polishing, keep moving to fresh areas of cloth as you work.

Virtuoso cleaner and polish can work wonders on fine scratches. They claim no abrasive, but I'm skeptical, especially the the cleaner. The Polish is about the best maintenance polish on the planet.

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NorlinBlackBeauty

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Thanks for all the tips @LtDave32 and @NorlinBlackBeauty
I do have a bottle of the Virtuoso polish, it is good stuff. I don't have the cleaner though.
Then get a bottle of the cleaner. They are formulated to work together quite well and do.

I was not aware of Eternashine. Might just do better than Virtuoso for all we know.
 

jstarr823

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The only reason I mentioned super fine grit sandpaper (such as micro mesh) is the depth of those scratches. You'll need something abrasive, whether it be compound or fine paper, to cut deep enough to remove them.
 




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