NGD - 2003 Les Paul Special

metalmike222

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
187
Reaction score
373
Yeah, I started putting the pick holders there back in the 90's when playing my first clubs. Much cheaper than the mic stand pick holders and impossible to leave on the mic stand once your set is over, never to be seen again... :)
 

Nintari

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2020
Messages
176
Reaction score
145
I swear this forum is a bunch of enablers. Now I want one!

2003 was a great year for Gibson - I had an 03 SG Standard and I loved that guitar.

You did good, my friend.
I owned a 2003 Classic for about two months (was forced to sell it) and I agree, it was a great year. To this day, whenever I see a 2003 Classic for sale, I get a little antsy like... should I?
 

Brian Krashpad

Senior Member
Joined
May 12, 2008
Messages
976
Reaction score
984
Really nice.
Congrats!!

Are Specials some kind of Jr. with 2 pickups?
Sort of. Traditionally Gibson made two flat-top Les Paul guitars with P-90 pickups. The single-pickup with a dogear cover is a Junior. The double-pickup with soapbar covers is a Special. Both Specials and Juniors came in singlecut and doublecut versions. Check my avatar photo for the two types of Special, a doublecut and a singlecut.

Unfortunately many years later Gibson ridiculously muddied the waters by calling a bunch of different Specials with a new oxymoronic model name: "Junior Special." This name is nonsensical, so a lot of people just call those Specials, since they have two pickups. That's what I do.
 

Del Rei

Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2012
Messages
87
Reaction score
110
Sort of. Traditionally Gibson made two flat-top Les Paul guitars with P-90 pickups. The single-pickup with a dogear cover is a Junior. The double-pickup with soapbar covers is a Special. Both Specials and Juniors came in singlecut and doublecut versions. Check my avatar photo for the two types of Special, a doublecut and a singlecut.

Unfortunately many years later Gibson ridiculously muddied the waters by calling a bunch of different Specials with a new oxymoronic model name: "Junior Special." This name is nonsensical, so a lot of people just call those Specials, since they have two pickups. That's what I do.
Thanks Brian.
Good explaining! :)
Nice Specials you have! Never played one, but I guess they have a unique tone, right?
 

Brian Krashpad

Senior Member
Joined
May 12, 2008
Messages
976
Reaction score
984
Thanks Brian.
Good explaining! :)
Nice Specials you have! Never played one, but I guess they have a unique tone, right?
To me they sound like Juniors, just with a neck pickup (which of course is mellower and more bassy), which gives more combination options. Some people say that even comparing bridge pickups only, a Junior sounds different because there's slightly more wood (since there's no neck pickup). Their ears must be better than mine. In that respect I think a Special with the bridge-only selected will sound extremely similar to a Junior.
 

smk506

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2009
Messages
5,286
Reaction score
9,646
To me they sound like Juniors, just with a neck pickup (which of course is mellower and more bassy), which gives more combination options. Some people say that even comparing bridge pickups only, a Junior sounds different because there's slightly more wood (since there's no neck pickup). Their ears must be better than mine. In that respect I think a Special with the bridge-only selected will sound extremely similar to a Junior.
The explanation that makes most sense to me isn’t so much about the extra bit of wood, but rather the lack of the neck pickups magnetism pulling on the strings that increases the the overall sustain.

It makes sense, but I think the real life difference would be pretty minimal.
 

endial

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2014
Messages
3,398
Reaction score
3,637
The explanation that makes most sense to me isn’t so much about the extra bit of wood, but rather the lack of the neck pickups magnetism pulling on the strings that increases the the overall sustain.

It makes sense, but I think the real life difference would be pretty minimal.
It is minimal, yes, but if you want Junior tone you really need a Junior. It makes a huge difference to me. Depends on the player/listener. In want of a Junior years ago I got a Special and kept trying to get that sound. It just wasn't there. The Special was a fantastic guitar, it just wasn't a Junior, and that's what I was wanting. Sold the Special (somewhat regretfully) and now own two Gibson Juniors and three other single P-90 guitars.

Correct on the neck pup's magnetic pull, but it's not just the sustain it affects.
Rhett Shull lays it out rather well here (5:37 for the sciency stuff)

 
Last edited:

Brian Krashpad

Senior Member
Joined
May 12, 2008
Messages
976
Reaction score
984
The explanation that makes most sense to me isn’t so much about the extra bit of wood, but rather the lack of the neck pickups magnetism pulling on the strings that increases the the overall sustain.

It makes sense, but I think the real life difference would be pretty minimal.
I'd forgotten that part. Probably because I just don't hear it. I've owned 2 Juniors and a single P-90 Melody Maker. People hear what they hear!
 


Latest Threads



Top