Newbie question about treble bleed

JLILL

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I did a search but i didn’t find what I was looking for. So,I have my first Les Paul on its way to me. It’s a Trad Pro V. The guitar has a lot (too many?) settings. Evidently you can turn treble bleed on/off. I play at fairly low volumes so I would think I would want the feature turned on. Question is does that negatively affect tone in some way. I’m not sure why you’d want it turned off.

Thanks in advance
Jim
 

01GT Eibach

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(Please feel free to correct any errors)

This is a good question -- What exactly do the Trad Pro V's dip switches (of which there are 5) actually do? And what position should they be in?

1 & 2) Two of the dip switches are for selecting "coil tap" or "coil split" for each of the two pickups when the Volume knob is pulled. A "coil tap" uses both coils of the humbucker, but "taps" into less of the coils creating a more single-coil tone. A "coil split" uses just one of the two coils for a more "true" single-coil compared to "coil tap".
RECOMMENDATION: Have each dip switch in "Coil Split" -- This will turn each humbucker into a single coil when you pull up on its Volume knob.

3 & 4) Two of the dip switches are passive "high pass filters" for each pickup which roll off the highs for a less trebly tone. This is, I believe, the OP's "treble bleed" question.
RECOMMENDATION: I would leave these both "off". In general, I am not a fan of these types of "extra" circuits, and prefer to have the beauty of the Les Paul and the Gibson pickups just ring through. Adjust any EQ with the amp.

5) The last is a "transient circuit". I have no idea what this does ...
RECOMMENDATION: Similar to 3 & 4, I would leave this "off". In general, I am not a fan of these "extra" circuits, and prefer to have the beauty of the Les Paul and the Gibson pickups just ring through.

Push-Pull Selections:
• Pulling the neck-pickup Volume knob either splits or taps the coils (dip-switch dependent; see above)
• Pulling the bridge-pickup Volume knob either splits or taps the coils (dip-switch dependent; see above)
• Pulling the neck-pickup Tone knob selects the out-of-phase setting
• Pulling the bridge-pickup Tone knob up selects the pickups’ outer coils

CAVEAT: While I have an older 2010 Trad Pro, that guitar (thankfully) only has coil-splits on each pickup via the Volume knobs, with no dip switches/PCB and no push/pull on the Tone controls. I have not even played a Trad Pro V so I am not an expert the Trad Pro V's specific tonal changes with its different available settings. Hence, it would be best to play with the different settings to corroborate the above recommendations.
Just an opinion ... I think GC and Gibson may be better served going back to that original 2009-2011 Trad Pro simpler configuration of having only coil taps, and no dip switches and no PCB ... ?
 

JLILL

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01GT thanks for the thorough reply. Honestly I wish it was a more simple set up like yours. I also looked at studio’s and Tribute’s. From what i’ve read i think i’ll like the pickups,neck shape and locking tuners on the Pro V. Hardshell case and sale price put it over the top for me.
 

01GT Eibach

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01GT thanks for the thorough reply. Honestly I wish it was a more simple set up like yours.
Yeah, just put the first two dip switches in "coil split", and everything else in "off" ... and then just forget about everything else and just play your new Les Paul. I have the coil-splits and I barley use them. I think you will be very happy with your decision. Please post a NGD thread when you get it!
 

framos

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I’m not sure why you’d want it turned off.

Well, some people actually want to be some treble loss when rolling the volume down. This allows, for instance, to switch from rhythm to lead sounds just by rolling the volume between 8-10. This allow a change in both volume and eq.

Other folks use their volume really low, to really clean up the sound, so yes, the treble bleed is welcome.

Furthermore, there is no such thing a perfect treble bleed - and many people find its effect a bit unnatural.
 

Cozmik Cowboy

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Or, you could just pull all that crap out, get some regular CTS pots (for that I would recommend 500K audio-taper, ±8% tolerance or better), and some decent .022 or .033 µF caps (material does not matter, only value), and wire them '50s Gibson style; Bob's yer uncle, you have a Les Paul, wired like a Les Paul.
 

JLILL

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I’m sure i’ll Play around with the settings for a couple of days before ultimately leaving it in standard Les Paul mode. I am curious how it will sound with one HB and a single activated.

If I ever have a problem with the electronics I probably will wire it old school. I don’t want to jump the gun on that train of thought though.

So far i’m Impressed with this forum. Glad I found it.
 

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