New Solar Term, SME: Surface Mass Ejection. Betelgeuse blew it's lid, and remains.

Olds442

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Not quite a Supernova, BG blew it's surface off.

Stars don't just supernova and die off, sometimes they nova over and over. We've documented many repeating nova from stars.

So BG picks up dust and it forms a layer on the surface of the sun, then blows it all off into space. That is according to experts in the paper below.


So if a CME is just a part of the corona being ejected, the SME is the entire surface of the star being blown out?

What would that do to a planet like earth, so close to the star? think, the end of days.

novae.jpg


there's an image of the known repeating novae stars, and how frequently we've witnessed them.

pretty crazy stuff. we were taught that stars would only nova once, how things change.
 

DeafDumbBlind Kid

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it wasn't quite picking up dust, it generated it through the SME, sort of like a dust storm or volcano ash plume reaching high in our atmosphere. Unlike a coronal mass ejection (CME), this material stayed in the atmosphere of the star, causing cooling and dimming of the light emitted. CME break away from the star's gravity and are flung out into space.

Not too worried about the sun doing the same, it doesn't have the mass of a giant like Betelgeuse. If you put Betelgeuse where the Sun is, it would reach out to the orbit of Jupiter.
 

Olds442

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it wasn't quite picking up dust, it generated it through the SME, sort of like a dust storm or volcano ash plume reaching high in our atmosphere. Unlike a coronal mass ejection (CME), this material stayed in the atmosphere of the star, causing cooling and dimming of the light emitted. CME break away from the star's gravity and are flung out into space.

Not too worried about the sun doing the same, it doesn't have the mass of a giant like Betelgeuse. If you put Betelgeuse where the Sun is, it would reach out to the orbit of Jupiter.
nov.jpg


here's an example of what i know of as a micro-novae (but names don't really matter, what they do does), this is what many postulate that the repeaters are doing, and what BG did. effectively blow your skin like a snake does every so often. but now they've labeled it as a SME. they make up new terms all the time for things they don't understand.

this system is obviously binary, but only one of them blew.

that's either the near field JWST or Hubble on the left, and the mid range JWST on the right which can see through the dust.

there are many examples of this, they just aren't identified as such. BG can now be classified as a repeater, since it's still there.
 

CB91710

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Not quite a Supernova, BG blew it's surface off.

Stars don't just supernova and die off, sometimes they nova over and over. We've documented many repeating nova from stars.

So BG picks up dust and it forms a layer on the surface of the sun, then blows it all off into space. That is according to experts in the paper below.


So if a CME is just a part of the corona being ejected, the SME is the entire surface of the star being blown out?

What would that do to a planet like earth, so close to the star? think, the end of days.

View attachment 626068

there's an image of the known repeating novae stars, and how frequently we've witnessed them.

pretty crazy stuff. we were taught that stars would only nova once, how things change.
I still never understood why astronomers decided that brighter objects should have negative magnitude.
On that list, only T Coronae Borealis and RS Ophiuchi would be visible to the naked eye, and only for a few days at their peak. Visible limit is around 6.
 

DeafDumbBlind Kid

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View attachment 626112

here's an example of what i know of as a micro-novae (but names don't really matter, what they do does), this is what many postulate that the repeaters are doing, and what BG did. effectively blow your skin like a snake does every so often. but now they've labeled it as a SME. they make up new terms all the time for things they don't understand.

this system is obviously binary, but only one of them blew.

that's either the near field JWST or Hubble on the left, and the mid range JWST on the right which can see through the dust.

there are many examples of this, they just aren't identified as such. BG can now be classified as a repeater, since it's still there.
reading the description, I first thought of a binary system but the OP was talking about Betelgeuse. Lo, I googled and find out indeed, Betelgeuse is a binary system

Yes, in a binary system of a white dwarf (extinct star's dead core that did not nova) and it's neighbor that is captured in a gravitational bond, material from the active neighbor accretes on the surface of the white dwarf until so much is there the gravitational force causes an explosion. Surprisingly, the companion usually survives the cataclysm and continues to feed the white dwarf.
 

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