New Les Pauls

yamariv

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And when that oil soaks in / dries up it will be the same color you started with. A light colored board does not mean it's "dry." 99% of the people that oil their boards are just going through the motions - it serves no purpose at all.

Depends what oil you use on your board, lemon mineral oil seems to evaporate like you speak of but linseed oil which is plant based and is sometimes used as a wood finish. In my SG pics above, the neck is still just as dark as it was and is nicely sealed now. I only moisten my boards about once a year to clean and condition them.
 

Guitpicky

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The main reason rosewood and ebony are used for fingerboards is a naturally high oil content. They don't need additional oiling on a brand new guitar. On both, color is not an indication of quality but merely aesthetic preference. Ebony is often dyed black and rosewood stained to make it darker. The only reason they do this is to meet customer expectations of an established norm :)
 

Rick

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Depends what oil you use on your board, lemon mineral oil seems to evaporate like you speak of but linseed oil which is plant based and is sometimes used as a wood finish. In my SG pics above, the neck is still just as dark as it was and is nicely sealed now. I only moisten my boards about once a year to clean and condition them.
It's your guitar, but I would never use a finishing oil like that on a rosewood board.
 

VDeuce

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One of the most recognized and trusted Luther's, Dan Erlewine, uses raw linseed oil on rosewood boards. I trust his judgment as a professional and have used linseed oil for decades.

Just don't use it more than once or twice a year and not too much.
 
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Sinster

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howlermonkey

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I'm pretty sure Gibson wants any finish and glue to have time to fully cure as long as possible....so....they use the extra time of transit.
I don't oil up any guitar I get new but rather wait a couple of months.
 

yamariv

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It's your guitar, but I would never use a finishing oil like that on a rosewood board.

Why would you not use it on your guitar? Just preference or are you claiming a negative effect?

Linseed oil is recommended by several luthiers and wood workers and won't harm rosewood if used sparingly. I can't find the exact video I watched (might have been the Gibson Memphis Factory tour video) where Gibson confirms they use Linseed oil on their boards. Gibson, Dan Erlewine, a local top luthier and Gibson is enough for me to trust it :hmm: Obviously, Gibson USA isn't using it lately though..
 

yamariv

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I'm pretty sure Gibson wants any finish and glue to have time to fully cure as long as possible....so....they use the extra time of transit.
I don't oil up any guitar I get new but rather wait a couple of months.
Good point!
 

Rick

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Why would you not use it on your guitar? Just preference or are you claiming a negative effect?

Linseed oil is recommended by several luthiers and wood workers and won't harm rosewood if used sparingly. I can't find the exact video I watched (might have been the Gibson Memphis Factory tour video) where Gibson confirms they use Linseed oil on their boards. Gibson, Dan Erlewine, a local top luthier and Gibson is enough for me to trust it :hmm: Obviously, Gibson USA isn't using it lately though..
Because it builds up a finish. I wouldn't want that on a rosewood board. Rickenbacker sprays nitro on their rosewood boards, I would never do that either. The oils from your hands when playing is all your rosewood board needs. Personally I wouldn't want to build up a finish (lacquer or oil) on the board.
 

yamariv

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Because it builds up a finish. I wouldn't want that on a rosewood board. Rickenbacker sprays nitro on their rosewood boards, I would never do that either. The oils from your hands when playing is all your rosewood board needs. Personally I wouldn't want to build up a finish (lacquer or oil) on the board.

I guess it's personal preference then, I tend to wash my hand before playing guitar to keep the grease and grime off the strings and board so a light oiling is more warranted in my case. To each their own :)
 

MooCheng

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have heard the reason Gibson and most manufacturers don't oil the fretboard is to prevent the case lining getting stained,

less warranty problem, if the case lining gets stained after you oil the board then its down to you
 

StudioFan

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Wouldn’t mind a new Gibson but don’t need one . :dunno:
Of course the fretwork and nut are great .
PLEK Machine .
Would not suggest a manual level job....

Gibson does have a stronger APEX headstock if you have big bucks .

And they don’t oil them because there is no need to , it is just a personal preference . Try bacon grease .
 

flamesarewicked

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That's a massive difference! What product did you use?


32939CE8-B99B-4BCC-9D53-2C719BEB7ACD.jpeg
 

Bend'n'Slide

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Some great guitars from the new Gibson lines beginning to show up around here!

As with most things in life, I suspect the simplest explantation is the best; I’m kind of inclined to agree with those who would suggest that (a) oiling the board prior to shipping is not absolutely necessary—and can be done very easily and to personal preference by each new owner—and (b) there is a good chance that they could end up getting a different set of complaints about oil from the fretboards marking and staining the linings of cases and gig bags.

From a simple business point of view, (a) has no cost but (b) has both cost and hassle implications for them.
 

Guitpicky

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I second the bacon grease but I strain it thru a napkin first to remove the bacon bits. I like to snack on them while playing :)
 

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