New Guitar (Broken Headstock)

Slick64

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Have heard of them, never seen one in person until today and I've bought and sold over a hundred guitars.

This arrived like this today.......

The seller and I are working something out, but need to wait 24hrs for the claim to be filed. What I'm looking for isn't blame right now.

It was fully insured. I'm wanting to know has anyone had this happen, how was the claim addressed, how long did it take, was the guitar repairable. etc....

What type of value hit would the guitar take. It was roughly $8K.

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CB91710

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It can certainly be repaired.
I've not had that happen fortunately.
 

judson

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that hurts just looking at that.....severed completely in the case i think is odd

but as far as value decline....i cant guess

i will add i now own two guitars will headstock repairs and if the discount is deep i am all in on buyin most times

completely sheared off is different than just an open crack where the head is still attached somewhat.

putting splines on that is the only fix..it can be repaired


really that hurts ...its looks familiar, i saw that somewhere...what is it? :hmm:
 
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Slick64

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The seller is working with me, so I don't want to go there......I was thinking it was dropped flat. The box and case were in good shape. Nothing visible.

I would think a complete neck replacement might be the best option. Just looking for potential options for me and the seller to look at. First thing is to see how UPS responds.
 

CB91710

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The seller is working with me, so I don't want to go there......I was thinking it was dropped flat. The box and case were in good shape. Nothing visible.

I would think a complete neck replacement might be the best option. Just looking for potential options for me and the seller to look at. First thing is to see how UPS responds.
Oh I wasn't saying the seller damaged it.
I'm positive it happened while in the care of UPS.

A replacement is one option. I honestly don't know what would be a bigger value hit.
That clean of a break, a proper repair with splines will end up being stronger than the original, and thus, a replacement.
A good guy can make that repair pretty well hidden, though the transparent finish it will always be apparent.
 

judson

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The seller is working with me, so I don't want to go there......I was thinking it was dropped flat. The box and case were in good shape. Nothing visible.

I would think a complete neck replacement might be the best option. Just looking for potential options for me and the seller to look at. First thing is to see how UPS responds.
i am sure a neck replacement will cost more than a repair but then if you had to compare value....the replacement neck would not affect value as much as a repaired neck would

one way to look at it... :dunno:

i know there are other threads here with same issue....if its brand spanking new they probably wont get involved with repairs and may just pay the claim.....luckily i never have had to file a claim.......keep us posted
 
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jvin248

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.

After spending on a repair, the finished guitar will be worth half what an unbroken used guitar sells for.

Not many "whole neck replacements" repairs are out there. I'm sure someone has tried but most of the repairs are various means of splines. The problem is the serial number goes with the headstock not the body. A neck/body swap is still 'not original'='half price' like a repair or a refin -- it's a major operation that a future buyer won't take the risk on without cutting the price in half to make it more attractive.

One avenue is look on Stratosphere for a Gibson LP empty body husk and move all your hardware over to that. If you have a vintage LP then the decision is a lot more challenging. Then your hardware gets graded against the serial number on the donar neck+body. "Those are not the pickups that should be on that guitar, and the knobs are all wrong".

The shipper's insurance only covers the cost of repair, not the value loss. They do it so often, because of these guitars' construction design, they know what it should cost to repair and give you/the seller that range. You have to do the leg work in finding a guy to do the work.

Here is what is involved in the repair ... it's not cheap, what would you charge for the amount of time it takes to do the job? Factor in extra time to make any jigs. And the time of making mistakes along the way.


Another example with longer splines, in process.


Even after repairs ... the headstock can break again!



Shouldn't Gibson change the headstock to neck design and stop this madness? They make Epiphone guitars with most of the proper design changes to avoid the problem (scarf joint, lower headstock angle, shorter headstock, small truss route). If you do a 'broken guitar headstock' image search via google you'll see nearly all examples are Gibson models.

The seller is screwed. They will never buy another Gibson. You are unlikely to buy another Gibson and take this risk again. Every headstock break murders potential future sales of that brand with the parties involved, and yet Gibson seems adamant about 'this years reissue is even closer to the fragility of the 59s than ever before!'.

I would suggest returning the guitar, super sad for the seller but the cleanest for you, and getting an Epiphone, PRS, or Gretsch instead. Stick with 22 fret models (24s will sound like SGs) and if you swap pickups, put Gibson pickups and Gibson pots 'n caps as they are a system, to get the same tones. Or like half the Gibson buyers who want 'that classic tone!' immediately swap in sets of Seymour Duncan/etc aftermarket pickups -- the tone was in the logo not the pickups, apparently.

Good luck with the Gibson Headstock Drama.

.
 
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BDW60

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So did it have the foam wedges in the case? Because the historic cases are garbage and only those foam wedges give a guitar a chance in a bad drop.

Gibson USA cases are so much better. Seems ridiculous.
 

CB91710

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If you do a 'broken guitar headstock' image search via google you'll see nearly all examples are Gibson models.
Epiphone is no stranger to broken headstocks.
I don't disagree that the Scarf joint is stronger, but this is not something that happens to every Gibson, nor does it happen without some kind of impact.
 

BDW60

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After spending on a repair, the finished guitar will be worth half what an unbroken used guitar sells for.

Not many "whole neck replacements" repairs are out there. I'm sure someone has tried but most of the repairs are various means of splines. The problem is the serial number goes with the headstock not the body. A neck/body swap is still 'not original'='half price' like a repair or a refin -- it's a major operation that a future buyer won't take the risk on without cutting the price in half to make it more attractive.

One avenue is look on Stratosphere for a Gibson LP empty body husk and move all your hardware over to that. If you have a vintage LP then the decision is a lot more challenging. Then your hardware gets graded against the serial number on the donar neck+body. "Those are not the pickups that should be on that guitar, and the knobs are all wrong".

The shipper's insurance only covers the cost of repair, not the value loss. They do it so often, because of these guitars' construction design, they know what it should cost to repair and give you/the seller that range. You have to do the leg work in finding a guy to do the work.

Here is what is involved in the repair ... it's not cheap, what would you charge for the amount of time it takes to do the job? Factor in extra time to make any jigs. And the time of making mistakes along the way.


Another example with longer splines, in process.


Even after repairs ... the headstock can break again!



Shouldn't Gibson change the headstock to neck design and stop this madness? They make Epiphone guitars with most of the proper design changes to avoid the problem (scarf joint, lower headstock angle, shorter headstock, small truss route). If you do a 'broken guitar headstock' image search via google you'll see nearly all examples are Gibson models.

The seller is screwed. They will never buy another Gibson. You are unlikely to buy another Gibson and take this risk again. Every headstock break murders potential future sales of that brand with the parties involved, and yet Gibson seems adamant about 'this years reissue is even closer to the fragility of the 59s than ever before!'.

I would suggest returning the guitar, super sad for the seller but the cleanest for you, and getting an Epiphone, PRS, or Gretsch instead. Stick with 22 fret models (24s will sound like SGs) and if you swap pickups, put Gibson pickups and Gibson pots 'n caps as they are a system, to get the same tones. Or like half the Gibson buyers who want 'that classic tone!' immediately swap in sets of Seymour Duncan/etc aftermarket pickups -- the tone was in the logo not the pickups, apparently.

Good luck with the Gibson Headstock Drama.

.
How many historics do you think Gibson would sell if they went to a scarf joint and a lower tilt back angle? Fat lotta nothin.

That’s why every time somebody makes these “logical” arguments it’s simply moot. Because it will never, can never happen.
 

Slick64

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So did it have the foam wedges in the case? Because the historic cases are garbage and only those foam wedges give a guitar a chance in a bad drop.

Gibson USA cases are so much better. Seems ridiculous.
No wedges.....
 

brokentoeswalker

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Shipped over 30 guitars, had a headstock break in japan when received at my proxy, before it would come to me. It was insured, and they actually handled everything, i got my money back after Japan post was satisfied etc.. took about a month and a few days though. This was during the pandemic so if that delayed the process somewhat i can understand. I was pretty bummed and mine was only a $350 guitar so i can only imagine your pain. My condolences
 

BDW60

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No wedges.....
That’s really too bad. Mine came with them in place. If all you do is put a historic in a Cali girl reissue case, it is impossible to keep the guitar from moving around inside. You can use other packing materials to simulate the wedges, but ...

I tried sending a 60th anniversary R9 for a short hop up to Chicago without them - no matter what I did, when I rocked the case I could hear the guitar moving inside. So I fabricated some, and that made the case quiet.

I put the R9 in an old USA case for comparison ... totally quiet, no thumps.
 

Skit

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Damn that sucks. That is a nice looking top and a nice dark board. Was the guitar packed at all inside the case?
 

truckermde

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Geez, sorry that happened :(

Best of luck getting it sorted.
 

cooljuk

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Pretty guitar. A well done repair and it will be as good as new. Maybe better.

Shipper insurance claims can be a drag. IME, they make you work for it!
 


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