New Gibson Fretboard Observation

matttornado

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I was in Sam Ash the other day & was checking out a new LP Standard they had on the floor. I noticed that the fretboard was really dry. I noticed that on a lot of other models too.
Are they not conditioning the fretboards with oil or something? The wood looked like it was freshly sanded.
 

edselman

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It probably was freshly sanded. There’s some controversy about how often to oil, how much oil to use or if a fretboard should even be oiled at all. Everybody has an opinion. I think Gibson is just leaving it to the customer to choose.
 

edselman

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I will never get why they can't manage to produce proper fretboards on the USA plant. Ridiculous.
If “proper” means smooth vs the splintery boards that we saw a couple of years ago, then I agree. But dry boards don’t bother me at all.
 

scozz

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I don’t know about this years LPs, but I saw some from last year where the fretboards looked so dry they actually look splintered.
 

edselman

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I don’t know about this years LPs, but I saw some from last year where the fretboards looked so dry they actually look splintered.
I got one of those in about 2017, a Studio Faded, what a mess. It looked OK when I got it. But later splinters started coming up.
 

danzego

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I was in Sam Ash the other day & was checking out a new LP Standard they had on the floor. I noticed that the fretboard was really dry. I noticed that on a lot of other models too.
Are they not conditioning the fretboards with oil or something? The wood looked like it was freshly sanded.


This has been fairly common over the last few years, unfortunately. It seems like Standards with headstocks stamped from around late April to May going forward have been pretty good. Hopefully it's a trend that continues.
 

jstarr823

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Seems hit or miss. I've had three 2019s so far. Two had boards that were just fine and one was a bit dry. Oiling a fretboard takes about 30 seconds, so I see the argument on both sides. Personally, I'd rather do it myself.
 
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Hatefulsob

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Poorly and incompletely sanded is more like it. Like most USA Gibson boards the one you saw needs sanding with a fairly fine grit and a treatment with s c johnson paste wax and it’ll be fine. Shit workmanship straight outta Memphis.
 

thxphotog

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This has been fairly common over the last few years, unfortunately. It seems like Standards with headstocks stamped from around late April to May going forward have been pretty good. Hopefully it's a trend that continues.

What is the new (or is it new) code to LP serial numbers? What do the numbers signify? (and for the record, my new 50s Standard was dryer than I'd like so I oiled it a little and not it's glorious)
 

danzego

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What is the new (or is it new) code to LP serial numbers? What do the numbers signify? (and for the record, my new 50s Standard was dryer than I'd like so I oiled it a little and not it's glorious)

The new code- which is a return to the old code they got away from the last few years- is YDDDYPPP where Y= year, D= day, and P= production number. So a Gibson with the number 10789234 would be 2019 (the 1 and the 9) on March 19th (the 78th day of the year) and the 234th headstock stamped that day.
 

moreles

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Freshly sanded? I wish. In addition to shipping guitars with extremely dry fretboards, Gibson does a rotten job prepping the boards in the factory. They come through rough and ugly. It is super easy to sand and prep a board; I go up to 2000 grit -- yes, you can tell -- and it takes mere minutes. But it's handwork, and it sure looks like Gibson just stops with whatever the machine can do. This is terrible because while it's easy to sand to perfection without frets installed, after fretting it is a billion times harder. I assume Gibson doesn't want to pay a human being to make their guitars better.
 

LPaddicted

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All Gibson fretboards I have seen since 2005 were dry like desert sand, so nothing new :slash:
 

thxphotog

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The new code- which is a return to the old code they got away from the last few years- is YDDDYPPP where Y= year, D= day, and P= production number. So a Gibson with the number 10789234 would be 2019 (the 1 and the 9) on March 19th (the 78th day of the year) and the 234th headstock stamped that day.

Awesome, thanks! And the example you provided is exactly one week after my guitar came off the line. :)
 
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PierM

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Freshly sanded? I wish. In addition to shipping guitars with extremely dry fretboards, Gibson does a rotten job prepping the boards in the factory. They come through rough and ugly. It is super easy to sand and prep a board; I go up to 2000 grit -- yes, you can tell -- and it takes mere minutes. But it's handwork, and it sure looks like Gibson just stops with whatever the machine can do. This is terrible because while it's easy to sand to perfection without frets installed, after fretting it is a billion times harder. I assume Gibson doesn't want to pay a human being to make their guitars better.

This.
 

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