Need some guidance on a finish repair

Roxy13

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The guitar is a poly finish, a Yamaha. This large "ding" is at the top of the lower bout, on the front of the guitar.

It has a faux binding where the edge is just unstained and covered in clearcoat that is either slightly tinted or has aged. And that is also damaged where this accident happened.

The edges are quite ragged looking too and I'm guessing if I were to attempt this they would need to be cleaned up somehow first and I'm uncertain about how to do that.

I know at the very least it would need some drops of amber before the CA glue filler and then of course scraped, sanded and polished out. I have done one large repair like this but it was also my guitar and it was black so it was easier.

This guitar is not mine so I have not committed on attempting the repair. I have concerns that due to my lack of experience doing such large areas that if I could not get very good to excellent results that I would feel bad about it. It's owner is also worried about it getting worse over time. At the least should I wick some thin CA around the edges to try to prevent any future problems?

IMG_20200925_115218150.jpg
 

Roxy13

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No one wants to take a stab at how to repair that?
 

LtDave32

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The trouble is, it's got a trans finish over a maple skin. Even if you shaved some maple as thin as the ding and laid it in there, there would still be witness lines. Far as the color goes, that's simple. It's just amber.

You could use some JB wood weld (the two-tube mix kind, not the stick), make up a small batch, work it in there and sand it down, but that would do two things; one that it would show a slightly different color on the repair, even though close it's still different, and two, that it would not have the maple grain.

And a third thing, with the sanding down, you'd likely have to re-spray the surrounding area.

-And paint the faux binding on.

I can't see how deep the ding is. Can you snap a pic at a bit of an angle that would show the depth?

Just spitballing here, but:

Another possible fix is to go to a finish lumber store (hardwoods, etc) and they might have some maple edge veneer. My hardwoods place does. It is simply thin maple strip that is all wood and very thin. Get a small amount of that stuff, treat the affected area like an inlay. You would still have a tell-tale line around it, but the repair would be maple like the top, and the coloring you could fog in, and it would take the color like the rest of the maple veneer on that top.
 

Roxy13

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Good idea on the veneer. I've bought oak veneer like that for a door frame in my house that had lead paint on it. I didn't want to touch that crap and I literally covered the whole frame in veneer, even the tiny strips with 45 degree bevels matching all the pieces. It was a pain in the butt, but it looks like what the frame should look like had I removed the paint.

I think no matter what there will be some witness lines due to it being poly.
 

moreles

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It's a dice roll. There's virtually no signficant grain in the banged up area, and I would be tempted to peel off an area of veneer slightly larger than the hack, and then glue in some veneer (bought or self-made; not that hard to make such a small piece) a littyle thicker than the surrounding surface, and with edges cut at a slight slant to maximize the chances of a good perimeter seam. Then, it's hand-sanding it to the right thickness, with special care where the seams are. Matching the color -- well, you never know, but it's usually do-able. CA or finish over that. It's possible that you can just finesses the faux binding if you don't remove a lot of wood. But -- but, but, but -- it's also possible to end up with gaps in the patch, color mismatch, and a crap fill on that. I barely-visible fix is possible, and I would try it, but you never can be sure how wood will reflect light under finish. Alternatively, you could just fill the hack with wood filler, sand it flush, and use a good color-match paint over that -- much the way broken sculptures get fixed. Sometimes a failed fussy repair look way worse than a simple, honest patch. Good luck!
 

Caretaker

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IMO, don`t pick at the scab.
No good will come from it.
It`s a battle scar. Wear it with honor.

Or, refin the entire top.
Poly will be a PITA.
 

Roxy13

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Like I said I don't feel confident that I'm the gal for the job but I did want to hear what others thought, and so does it's owner.

If it were mine I would give it a go so I'm still going to file away any info I get from this thread. And it's owner may still look for someone to fix that.
 


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