Neck Relief

moreles

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But let it take hold, give it a chance.
Yes, yes, yes, and yes! You say it's been sitting for 15 years. It's not going to return to form in a day, and depending on moisture content, simple "return to form" (by a former tree), and other factors, the material itself is necessarily slow responding -- which is a good thing! (Who wants a neck that reacts big-time and fast to everything?) If the neck were twisted, I'd be worried. If it's just bowed, you've got a lot to try, slowly, before you need to do any worrying at all.
 

Uncle Vinnie

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Lt Dave is exactly right.

And to finish Vinnie's question if I continue turn the TR counter clockwise, the nut, of the truss rod, is loose. I'm not exactly sure how truss rods or at least this truss rod works but I'm assuming the nut would completely loosen from the rod. I know it's not broke because I can tighten it back up fine.
Ah. Now I capisce. The TR nut is loose on the TR threads, not that the whole TR is turning. Gotcha.

I was thinking the TR was turned so tight that it was back bowing the neck and after just a teeny tiny 1/4 of a turn the whole TR was loose.
 

Colu41

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So I strung it up with 11s. Overnight it seems like the neck is dead straight. How long should I keep the 11s on before I try putting lighter strings on?
I also have a little fretwork to do but. Seems from everyone here to just leave it for awhile?
 

Recklessrog

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So I strung it up with 11s. Overnight it seems like the neck is dead straight. How long should I keep the 11s on before I try putting lighter strings on?
I also have a little fretwork to do but. Seems from everyone here to just leave it for awhile?
I would leave it at least 3-5 days, by then it should have a forward bow which you can then tighten the truss rod to set the relief. If you change to lighter strings you will heve to readjust the truss rod but always do it in small increments
 

Colu41

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I would leave it at least 3-5 days, by then it should have a forward bow which you can then tighten the truss rod to set the relief. If you change to lighter strings you will heve to readjust the truss rod but always do it in small increments
Thanks. He wants 8s on it so. That would be quite of a drastic difference from the 11s. So waiting a few days is probably much needed
 

stp

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that could have a 2 way trust rod .
 

Colu41

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So I strung it up with 11's. I waited about a full week. I cut them off, and he wanted 8's so was a little worried about that. And as soon as took the 11's off and strung up the 8's it was right back to where it was. Maybe a little less of a bow but still there.
Now I'm lost for what to do. Other than string it up with 11's again, or maybe 12's and let it sit for a long time.
Any tips?
Im about to tell my buddy to just play 11s :rofl:
 

Recklessrog

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So I strung it up with 11's. I waited about a full week. I cut them off, and he wanted 8's so was a little worried about that. And as soon as took the 11's off and strung up the 8's it was right back to where it was. Maybe a little less of a bow but still there.
Now I'm lost for what to do. Other than string it up with 11's again, or maybe 12's and let it sit for a long time.
Any tips?
Im about to tell my buddy to just play 11s :rofl:
You say you CUT the stings off, did you do that while they were tuned up?? Never ever cut stings while they are under tension. the shock that it gives to a well aged and seasoned neck could shatter the fretboard to neck glue, and damage the ageing that has taken place over many years
( Wood loses structure over time as water-soluble sugars that make up the wood's cell walls (cellulose, lignin, and hemicellulose) break down. This causes the wood to become lighter and more resonant, affecting the wood's ability to hold moisture relative to humidity. ) (from wiki)
Problem is that it got the bow over 15 years so if it gone back it means its going to take a lot of persuading to come forward. My suggestion would be to re-string it with 11's or 12's with the nut left loose, leave it a week, slacken the strings off until they have no tension and see what its like again. If no improvement, tune it up again, this time tune it a semitone sharp and leave it for a week. Looks like you could be in for a long wait on that one.
Another problem with cutting strings under tension, especially steel wire, is that they can possiblly hit you in the face!!
 

Colu41

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You say you CUT the stings off, did you do that while they were tuned up?? Never ever cut stings while they are under tension. the shock that it gives to a well aged and seasoned neck could shatter the fretboard to neck glue, and damage the ageing that has taken place over many years
( Wood loses structure over time as water-soluble sugars that make up the wood's cell walls (cellulose, lignin, and hemicellulose) break down. This causes the wood to become lighter and more resonant, affecting the wood's ability to hold moisture relative to humidity. ) (from wiki)
Problem is that it got the bow over 15 years so if it gone back it means its going to take a lot of persuading to come forward. My suggestion would be to re-string it with 11's or 12's with the nut left loose, leave it a week, slacken the strings off until they have no tension and see what its like again. If no improvement, tune it up again, this time tune it a semitone sharp and leave it for a week. Looks like you could be in for a long wait on that one.
Another problem with cutting strings under tension, especially steel wire, is that they can possiblly hit you in the face!!
No I didn't cut them under tension. I actually got the ends out of the tuners before I cut. But instead of throwing the 12s on I restrung them with 9s because it seemed like overnight the 8s took the bow up a bit. It's been a few days now with 9s on and the neck seems pretty straight. My only problem with that is there's no room for truss rod adjustment anymore if I leave it at that. The guitar plays great now.
 

SlingBlader

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You say you CUT the stings off, did you do that while they were tuned up?? Never ever cut stings while they are under tension. the shock that it gives to a well aged and seasoned neck could shatter the fretboard to neck glue, and damage the ageing that has taken place over many years
( Wood loses structure over time as water-soluble sugars that make up the wood's cell walls (cellulose, lignin, and hemicellulose) break down. This causes the wood to become lighter and more resonant, affecting the wood's ability to hold moisture relative to humidity. ) (from wiki)
Problem is that it got the bow over 15 years so if it gone back it means its going to take a lot of persuading to come forward. My suggestion would be to re-string it with 11's or 12's with the nut left loose, leave it a week, slacken the strings off until they have no tension and see what its like again. If no improvement, tune it up again, this time tune it a semitone sharp and leave it for a week. Looks like you could be in for a long wait on that one.
Another problem with cutting strings under tension, especially steel wire, is that they can possiblly hit you in the face!!
Dude... seriously. Please produce photos or documentation to back up this nonsense. You're seriously overstating.
 

rfrizz

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W A R N I N G

Don't do this until the others have replied.LtDave32 in particular is a luthier.


I have an old, cheap (2003) Epi LP II which crapped out in the same way. Even though it is the second-to-cheapest, I got lucky. It has a good player. I wasn't about to chuck it or use it for parts. A set of Ernie Ball 10s (yellow pack #2221) did provide enough pull to get the neck bow right.

That wasn't a solution because I always used 8s on it, but the truss rod was had no more adjusting room on it. It actually came loose, and there was still back bow with 8s on it.

I was going to try the same thing the others suggested, putting heavy strings on it and letting it sit. At the recommendation of two experienced guitar techs, I tightened the truss rod by turning it clockwise as far as it would go, then I loosened it. It fixed the problem immediately.

This may not be a permanent thing, so I still plan to put some heavy strings on it and let it naturally gain a little front bow. If it is possible with the 8s, I may just leave the 8s on it and tune them high enough to exert the same pull as a set of 10s or 11s.

There is an equation which will tell you how much tension strings exert based on size and open-string frequency. The D'Addario website has it in the technical details area, and it may even have a calculator to do the math for us.


Before doing the truss rod tightening-loosening part, make sure someone knowledgeable comments on this!
 

Colu41

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Don't do this until the others have replied.LtDave32 in particular is a luthier.


I have an old, cheap (2003) Epi LP II which crapped out in the same way. Even though it is the second-to-cheapest, I got lucky. It has a good player. I wasn't about to chuck it or use it for parts. A set of Ernie Ball 10s (yellow pack #2221) did provide enough pull to get the neck bow right.

That wasn't a solution because I always used 8s on it, but the truss rod was had no more adjusting room on it. It actually came loose, and there was still back bow with 8s on it.

I was going to try the same thing the others suggested, putting heavy strings on it and letting it sit. At the recommendation of two experienced guitar techs, I tightened the truss rod by turning it clockwise as far as it would go, then I loosened it. It fixed the problem immediately.

This may not be a permanent thing, so I still plan to put some heavy strings on it and let it naturally gain a little front bow. If it is possible with the 8s, I may just leave the 8s on it and tune them high enough to exert the same pull as a set of 10s or 11s.

There is an equation which will tell you how much tension strings exert based on size and open-string frequency. The D'Addario website has it in the technical details area, and it may even have a calculator to do the math for us.


Before doing the truss rod tightening-loosening part, make sure someone knowledgeable comments on this!
Being this LP style guitar I have is literally a no name brand. I think I paid $180 for it back in early 2000s, I don't think it would stand up to completely tightening the truss rod. I feel the neck would snap in three. Lol.
 

rfrizz

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Being this LP style guitar I have is literally a no name brand. I think I paid $180 for it back in early 2000s, I don't think it would stand up to completely tightening the truss rod. I feel the neck would snap in three. Lol.
Well, maybe this is the cheap guitar to practice on!
 


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