Neck Angle / Stop Piece Height

Rookie59

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2018
Messages
35
Reaction score
39
B1DFD127-2741-4895-8DF2-1DCD1C6E1ED0.jpeg
Hi. I have a new 2018 Les Paul Standard and I am seeking opinions on the neck angle and stop piece height. I’ve just set it up and I am kind of concerned about the height I had to adjust the stop piece and even at this height the low E is still slightly touching. Does this seem extreme? Could it be a problem long term? Should I shim it with washers or something? Not sure how close it is to having the bolts pop out.

I really don’t want to top wrap, I think it’s ugly and spoils the look. I’ve seen a couple other posts for a gotoh piece that looks good - if it’s still available - or are there any other suggestions?

I didn’t think I’d be looking for a solution like this for a brand new guitar, but I absolutely love the top and the rosewood board on the neck and the inlay work is better than I’ve seen in a while.

Any insights would be greatly appreciated.
 

Attachments

LesPauI+SG=Win

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2009
Messages
4,254
Reaction score
2,284
My suggestion is to top wrap... that would be your easiest and cheapest solution. I am a functionality > looks type of person, myself.
 

PierM

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2016
Messages
4,307
Reaction score
7,865
Looks fine and correct as it is in the picture.

Basic rule is, as soon as you have just a tad of clearance between strings and the back of the bridge, you should be fine. Of course there is also the intonation, which is affecting the saddle position, hence the final break angle available. I'm assuming your intonation is right.

I know it doesn't look great, but it will save you from collapsing the Nashville in the mid/long term.
 

Rookie59

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2018
Messages
35
Reaction score
39
Hi. Thanks to both of you for your replies... I see I posted twice will have to see how to remove one. I am starting to think top wrapping may be the solution... and the intonation is pretty much spot on. Maybe a little tweak needed. It has been a while since I owned a Les Paul and I’ve never had one that required the stop piece to be anything but tight against the top. Now I cannot say they were actually setup properly or if I even noticed the string touching the bridge. Guess I have a little more knowledge now and gained even more in the last 12 hours. I thought there was something wrong and the neck angle was flawed... seems that based on the replies to the posts and others I’ve read this isn’t too bad and kinda normal. I just wasn’t sure how much more of the bolt was screwed in to the body and whether it was going to cause problems based on the string pressures. I rest my hand on the stop piece. Guess it will be something I’ll have to adjust to.
 

PierM

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2016
Messages
4,307
Reaction score
7,865
Hi. Thanks to both of you for your replies... I see I posted twice will have to see how to remove one. I am starting to think top wrapping may be the solution... and the intonation is pretty much spot on. Maybe a little tweak needed. It has been a while since I owned a Les Paul and I’ve never had one that required the stop piece to be anything but tight against the top. Now I cannot say they were actually setup properly or if I even noticed the string touching the bridge. Guess I have a little more knowledge now and gained even more in the last 12 hours. I thought there was something wrong and the neck angle was flawed... seems that based on the replies to the posts and others I’ve read this isn’t too bad and kinda normal. I just wasn’t sure how much more of the bolt was screwed in to the body and whether it was going to cause problems based on the string pressures. I rest my hand on the stop piece. Guess it will be something I’ll have to adjust to.
No worries, the Tailpiece studs are very deep, so there is plenty of stud still in the bushings.

Also, you can deck a bit more than this if you really need to. It's not that your guitar will explode LOL, it's just more pressure on the bridge.
 

Rookie59

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2018
Messages
35
Reaction score
39
Hi. Thank you. I may adjust it a little... good to know there’s lots of thread left in the body. Guess there’s no need to shim the bolt with washers to level the load. A couple other suggestion were turn the bridge around or swap for an ABR-1? Think I’ll stay status quo with stock pieces for now. Having relaxed I’m thinking it would be cool if someone were to market a stop piece that’s a little wider to prevent the end winds from being exposed and grooved to permit the strings to sit below the level of the surface when top loaded. Would be something I’d put on any Gibson with this setup... whether it needed top loading or not.
 

Redfish

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2007
Messages
590
Reaction score
369
Faber makes a locking tailpiece with different height bushings. I got the highest and it plays like a top wrapped guitar(slinky) and would get the strings off the bridge for you. I can’t stand the feel of the strings over the tailpiece with a top wrap.
 
Last edited:

Rookie59

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2018
Messages
35
Reaction score
39
Faber makes a locking tailpiece with different height bushings. I got the highest and it plays like a top wrapped guitar(slinky). I can’t stand the feel of the strings over the tailpiece.
Hi. Thanks. I will definitely check it out!
 

scozz

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
5,290
I like the tailpiece decked, I rest my hand on it and it’s much more comfortable when it’s decked. But having it all the way down creates too much of a string angle, and some strings will touch the back of the bridge. Neither of those are optimal....

....so I topwrap.

I like the shallow string angle, strings don’t touch the back of the bridge, and I get a slightly slinkier feel...also palm mutting is more comfortable. All these are pluses for me....

....but I’ll readily admit it’s not for everyone. :D



 

Rookie59

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2018
Messages
35
Reaction score
39
You know given that I’m not that fond of how it looks raised, I’m definitely going to top wrap when i change the strings. Based on your sense of how it plays and the look of your pics it is worth experimenting. Will decide which way to keep it after trying both current and too wrapped options!!
 

Redfish

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2007
Messages
590
Reaction score
369

Up to you but the Faber is the perfect compromise to me. Feels rock solid and the tailpiece doesn't fall off if you have to take the strings off for pickup change, fretboard oiling etc. If you don't mind the feel of top wrapping then that is definitely the cheapest option.
Not really noticeable unless I pointed it out to you.
 
Last edited:

Les Paul John

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2018
Messages
1,067
Reaction score
1,737
Looks fine and correct as it is in the picture.

Basic rule is, as soon as you have just a tad of clearance between strings and the back of the bridge, you should be fine. Of course there is also the intonation, which is affecting the saddle position, hence the final break angle available. I'm assuming your intonation is right.

I know it doesn't look great, but it will save you from collapsing the Nashville in the mid/long term.

Agreed 100%
 

Les Paul John

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2018
Messages
1,067
Reaction score
1,737
You know given that I’m not that fond of how it looks raised, I’m definitely going to top wrap when i change the strings. Based on your sense of how it plays and the look of your pics it is worth experimenting. Will decide which way to keep it after trying both current and too wrapped options!!
Keep in mind if you use a hybrid set of strings (9-46) or super duper lights at 9-42 the top wrap is going to make your strings feel like spaghetti. Most top wrap aficionados use 10-46 or higher.

Just my opinion, it may appeal to you. Try it and see!
 

scozz

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
4,170
Reaction score
5,290
Keep in mind if you use a hybrid set of strings (9-46) or super duper lights at 9-42 the top wrap is going to make your strings feel like spaghetti. Most top wrap aficionados use 10-46 or higher.

Just my opinion, it may appeal to you. Try it and see!
This is not true at all! I’ve been using 9-46 for over 25 years now. There is only a very slight difference in string feel....spaghetti?.....uh.....on! :facepalm:
 

Rookie59

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2018
Messages
35
Reaction score
39
I’m always 10 - 46 on a Les Paul. Tried 9’s and while they were nice I switched back... it was just a feel thing.
 

Redfish

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2007
Messages
590
Reaction score
369
Yes. I bought this R8 from a forum member and it already had the Faber tailpiece on it with the lowest bushing and top wrapped. I contacted Faber and got the highest bushing. Can't remember if they charged me or not. FWIW it also came with the locking Faber bridge but I didn't care for it and replaced it with a Creamtone with nylon saddles on the unwound strings. Amazing bridge that noticeably fattens up the unwound strings.

As I bought it
 
Last edited:

PierM

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2016
Messages
4,307
Reaction score
7,865
This is not true at all! I’ve been using 9-46 for over 25 years now. There is only a very slight difference in string feel....spaghetti?.....uh.....on! :facepalm:
There is always a relationship between string gauge and longitudinal stiffness / perceived string compliance, and break angle. Not talking tension here, which is just a function of the pitch, so doesn't change with break angle, but less break angle does indeed means less perceived longitudinal stiffness/compliance.

If you combine a very light string gauge with an almost non-existent break angle, you'll be for sure getting a very very low longitudinal stiffness as you are almost removing the pointy friction component, away from the saddles. Heavier gauges are for sure compensating this effect, because of the higher tension.

More details here; https://www.liutaiomottola.com/myth/perception.htm
 




Top