National Anthem butchered yet again

SteveC

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Wow... that was fucking awful and insulting. Chaka deserves a huge kick in her spunt for that performance.
 

Thundermtn

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i may have teared a little, not saying i did but i may have
Lol. I didn't know of him until I saw this on live TV, I wanted to get in a time machine and cross the Potomac with Washington or storm Omaha Beach, consequences be damned.

He sang that one almost a decade ago and I still remember it above every other version or time I ever heard it.
 

cybermgk

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I kid you not. Played it, and our Dog, started yowling and whining like she does when something is badly wrong.
 

James R

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Wow, that was just plain awful.

I'm sorry to hear your great nation's anthem just get completely butchered like that.
Should be punishable by law.
 

rxbandit

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Watched it live last night, it was terrible. The all star game however was actually awesome! The changes they made this year really worked out
 

Crotch

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Watched it live last night, it was terrible. The all star game however was actually awesome! The changes they made this year really worked out
Kyle Lowry talking fuckin charges and people bitching about the refs. It was great. And Giannis's 2 blocks on LeBron made my whole night.
 

irocdave12

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One could argue that Jimi's version sounded like shit.
Ironically just before Chaka’s disaster the girl who did the Canadian National Anthem knocked it out of the park. She made it sound somewhat unique and sang beautifully but kept to the fundamentals of the song and did her country proud in my book. And then we rolled out our best and brightest... from the 80’s to one up her...Chunka Khan
 

Freddy G

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Ironically just before Chaka’s disaster the girl who did the Canadian National Anthem knocked it out of the park. She made it sound somewhat unique and sang beautifully but kept to the fundamentals of the song and did her country proud in my book. And then we rolled out our best and brightest... from the 80’s to one up her...Chunka Khan
'cept she sang the woketard "in all of us command"....I will never ever sing that. It will always be what I was taught as a child... "in all thy sons command"
 
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EasyAce

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I do not understand the singing of anthems at sporting events. They don't do it for concerts, plays, musicals, movies, or any other paid public event. An audience of piss-tanks is somehow more patriotic?
When the knee-protests during "The Star Spangled Banner" and the protests against those protests kicked into gear a couple of years ago, I looked it up for an essay I published about the issue. Here's the portion that deals with that history:

Those who wonder just how "The Star Spangled Banner" got mixed up with American sports events can thank World War I, the 1918 World Series, and the U.S. Navy band. Whether to credit or to blame depends on your point of view, of course, but this is how it actually began:

1) The war was a little over a month from ending when the Series began in Chicago's Comiskey Park. The Cubs met the Red Sox, but it was feared the Cubs' home playpen, which was seven years from being re-named Wrigley Field, was too small to accommodate anticipated Series audiences. This was also before both franchises became symbols of futility married to extraterrestrial heartbreak. Entering the 1918 Series, between them they'd won six of the previous fifteen Series. After it, neither would win a World Series until the 21st Century.

2) A pall hung over the 1918 Series with the war not quite ended; over 100,000 American troops were killed to that point, and the Series began a day after a bomb exploded in the Chicago Federal Building, killing four. Between that, and the government announcing they were about to start drafting baseball players (government had already ordered baseball season to end by Labor Day, making for an all-September World Series), things were a little less than festive as Babe Ruth (still a Red Sox, and still a full-time pitcher) squared off against Hippo Vaughan.

3) Several baseball players, including eventual Hall of Fame inaugural class members Christy Mathewson and Ty Cobb, were already in military service for the war, Mathewson and Cobb assigned to the newly created Chemical Service. (Mathewson would be gassed accidentally during a training exercise; it caused the tuberculosis that would kill him in 1925.)

4) In terms of baseball, and depending on your point of view, the game itself might have been a bit of a snooze. Ruth tossed a 6-hit shutout, and the game's only run scored in the fourth inning, when Stuffy McInnis drove in Dave Shean with one out and two on. But during the seventh-inning stretch, the Navy band began to play. (It was common in those years for military bands to provide music during sporting events.) Hearing "The Star Spangled Banner," Red Sox third baseman Fred Thomas, who'd just taken his field position as the sides changed, turned toward the flag and gave a military salute.

5) Thomas himself was a Navy man on furlough to play in the Series. (His commander was said to have been a huge baseball fan.) Thomas's spontaneous salute prompted other players on the field and in the dugouts to rise with their hands over their hearts. The already-standing crowd followed suit.

6) For the rest of that World Series (the Red Sox won in six games), the seventh inning stretch featured "The Star Spangled Banner." Before that sixth game, Red Sox owner Harry Frazee made sure wounded veterans had free tickets to the game. He also decided "The Star Spangled Banner" would be played just before game time, specifically to honor those wounded veterans. After the Red Sox won the Series (their Game Six triumph featured both their runs scoring on an outfield error), Frazee made the playing of the song a regular at the Red Sox's home games.

Other teams in baseball and other professional sports leagues followed suit, gradually, entirely on their own. The song became America's official national anthem in 1931. Sports teams featured it before games throughout World War II, with no known official command to do so, until the war ended. After that war, the National Football League made it mandatory before all games. That'd teach them . . .
My own view---it isn't one to which I came lightly, especially being an Air Force veteran myself---is that playing "The Star Spangled Banner" before every damn last ball game renders its meaning and patriotism itself between dubious and meaningless. Baseball actually has no formal rule mandating playing "The Star Spangled Banner" before each game; the NFL and the NBA had them even before the Colin Kaepernick kerfuffle. Baseball also has no official rule regarding "God Bless America" during the seventh inning stretch, which began spontaneously after 9/11 but now continues somewhat sporadically.

My own preference, since the fools who insist on it being played before every game no matter what aren't going to surrender symbolic over real, from-the-heart patriotism, would be this: Play "The Star Spangled Banner" on Opening Day. Play it on any major national holidays on which baseball games are played, like Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, and Labour Day. Play it before Game One of the World Series. Do likewise with "God Bless America" during the seventh inning stretch.

We don't need those songs played before every damn last game of every damn last season to prove our patriotism. Patriotism from habit isn't real patriotism. That comes only from the heart. 'Nuff said.
 


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