My G string on my acoustic

Mule Train

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It's a Yamaha 730 nato neck and I think it's maybe a tension issue. If I move the G string on the saddle closer to the D string it gets better and less buzzing or goes away all together. The neck has tension clockwise and is straight no bow and the frets are level. It plays real nice otherwise with action not high or low, almost perfect with ok intonation.

I started my own set up with the capo and the feeler gauge (truss rod counter clockwise neck bowed down)method and the action was way to high but the G string quit buzzing. I never touched the nut nor did I shave the saddle yet. Would I need another saddle with a different compensation or go back to my previous standard set up with the high action and shave down the saddle?
 

emoney

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It's kinda hard to say, because either choice could be the right one. What is the saddle material?
Normally, the "G" string on the saddle is pretty much all the way forward, so I'm assuming
that's the case for yours. Moving it closer to the "D" moves it away, obviously.

Having said that, when you had the G moved over, how was the intonation? A lot of times,
an acoustic guitar needs a neck reset to get the action good and low. Factories are notorious
on being "Safe" when it comes to action, meaning they focus more on tuning/intonation
than they do how far off the strings are.

On a related side note, a bone saddle, imho, performs much better than the plastic, so
if you don't have a one, this isn't a bad time to start with a blank, get the height correct
first for your preferred action, and then set the intonation by shaving either the front or
the back wall, depending on the string, of course. Pics tell a thousand words, don't forget,
so it wouldn't hurt to share some so we can see what you consider "high action".
 

D'tar

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New strings? Try a wound G string. Can't tell on my phone if yours is wound.
 

Mule Train

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The G string is not wound. I believe they are Ernie Ball Rockin Blues. I should try different strings too I guess before anything else. The guitar was brand new so I immediately replaced the strings. The stock setup or action was way high and hard to play but no buzzing.
 

LtDave32

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Hiya Muley!

If you're moving the G closer to the D at the bridge, and the problem goes away, then I'd say there could be two things happening

It could be getting a fresh piece of saddle, indicating that some saddle dressing is in order.

It could be raising the string slightly by going to a very slightly higher position on the bridge, indicating a bit of issue elsewhere.

I'm going to assume the buzz is happening while open stringed, not fretted. Yes?

Either way, it's minor. A bit of good setup should cure your ills.
 

Mule Train

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Yes it buzzes while open and fretted. Light playing or soft light touch it does not buzz at all, just when you play harder louder. It gets less noticeable the further you go up the neck until about the twelfth then it starts slightly again. I also ordered a new set of the basic Martin 180 light gauge which I almost always use with no problems.
 

LtDave32

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Yes it buzzes while open and fretted. Light playing or soft light touch it does not buzz at all, just when you play harder louder. It gets less noticeable the further you go up the neck until about the twelfth then it starts slightly again. I also ordered a new set of the basic Martin 180 light gauge which I almost always use with no problems.

Aha!

Open or fretted, same problem exists.

I am no repair expert. I build from scratch, and that's a whole 'nuther skill set than those who repair problems. But critical thinking and a bit of process of elimination indicate to me that the problem lies in the bridge.

But still minor, for only one string is affected.

Repair gurus; please step in and confirm if you can, for we could all learn from your advice.
 

Mule Train

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Yes I will take any advice, even if you say take it to the shop, but I'd like to try a few common fixes first. Maybe a different bridge or something? The body repair came out solid, thank you all for that, and it's a good guitar now. Acoustics are a world away from a Tele and very touchy at setup for me.
 

ARandall

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I would guess that the specific spot on the bridge saddle is to blame. Its probably badly formed.
 

Mule Train

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That was my first thought too, substandard saddles. One thing for sure I won't be the first person to change the saddle out on a Made In China guitar. I have a couple of saddles in my parts case and I tried the bone one. The guitar seemed to sound a little better but the result was the same. The bone also had a higher profile on the A and low E but the others looked identical in terms of height and compensation.
 

emoney

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It's really hard to see in the pics, but you can try shaving a smidge of the bridge where
the G string rests, angling toward the headstock as you sand. The other thing, again not
really easy to see, is put some relief in the neck. Remember when you turn that truss rod
two things....a)a little bit of a turn can go a LONG way, so go in baby steps. And....b)acoustic
guitars can make some serious cracking sounds when you're adjusting trussrods. Don't let
it scare you, in the event it happens.
 

Mule Train

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I found a set of Musicians Gear acoustic strings in with my electric guitar stuff. I changed out the solid G string with the wound .025 one and it worked. Touchy touchy these things are and I love it. I still want a bone saddle though and when I restring it with my Martin strings I'll put it on and see what transpires then.
 

Mule Train

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I adjusted the truss rod clockwise slightly and shaved the bottom of the new pre-cut bone saddle about 1/16 on the A Low E side. A new set of Martin Light gauge Mexican strings with the wound G and it is fixed. No more buzzing or high action.






 

LtDave32

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Outstanding, Mule.

An "atta-boy" is in order.

If that saddle is indeed bone, you should realize a bit more of punch and clarity.
 

Mule Train

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Outstanding, Mule.

An "atta-boy" is in order.

If that saddle is indeed bone, you should realize a bit more of punch and clarity.

I could tell the minute I started tightening and tuning the new strings. :thumb:
I am very happy with it.
 

moreles

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Glad you got it fixed. FYI, almost all the info you provided, pics included, was too general to allow the well-informed and helpful people on this forum to be as helpful as they might have been. Nut, action, relief, and intonation issues are often matters involving very small dimensional differences. But at least we were able to suggest that you focus on the G string first. To me, had you explained that you were using an unwound G at the outset, I would have immediately advised switching to a wound string since that guitar is designed and set up for a wound G.
 

Mule Train

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Glad you got it fixed. FYI, almost all the info you provided, pics included, was too general to allow the well-informed and helpful people on this forum to be as helpful as they might have been. Nut, action, relief, and intonation issues are often matters involving very small dimensional differences. But at least we were able to suggest that you focus on the G string first. To me, had you explained that you were using an unwound G at the outset, I would have immediately advised switching to a wound string since that guitar is designed and set up for a wound G.

That was my bad not knowing about the wound and unwound string. It's not a mistake I'll repeat I can promise you that. :) Still though I learned some new things. Also with help on the body repair I got here, this guitar would not be what it is today without you all. Thanks. :thumb:
 

Bill Hicklin

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The G string is not wound. I believe they are Ernie Ball Rockin Blues. I should try different strings too I guess before anything else. The guitar was brand new so I immediately replaced the strings. The stock setup or action was way high and hard to play but no buzzing.


There's your problem. Stock acoustic saddles are intonated for a wound G; the EBs have a plain G like most electric sets. Get a light acoustic set, or refile your saddle for the G string moving its contact point away from the nut, like the B-string is.
 

Mule Train

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There's your problem. Stock acoustic saddles are intonated for a wound G; the EBs have a plain G like most electric sets. Get a light acoustic set, or refile your saddle for the G string moving its contact point away from the nut, like the B-string is.

I have Martin light gauge now and they work great. I like to try different brands, it's fun, but will stay using light gauge with a wound G.
 

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