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pshupe

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It was an article about the reissues, I will try and find it, possibly not used on their ‘run of the mill’ stuff.
Yes - IMO it is nice to qualify that statement. This is also probably limited to the higher end RIs like the burst years. It is much more expensive to find quartered material large enough for a neck blank. The custom shop "should" be using that in a $7,000 - $10,000 guitar. :naughty:


Thanks guys for the advice.

I guess we are all agreed that quartersawn is the strong preference. What I'm not sure on yet is how much a difference it makes to be almost quartersawn. I get that it won't be quite as strong.

I've asked the vendor to have another look to see if he has anything closer to a true quartersawn blank. If not, I might have to take the nearly version

Although I want to get as close to a '59 as possible, in not that hung up about neck angle. If shaving a couple of degrees makes it stronger, it won't bother me in the slightest.

Thanks all.
It also depends how you define "quartersawn" I think most places would call anything with the grain orientation within about 30 degrees of perpendicular to be quartersawn. Ideally it would be nice to be completely perpendicular. I try and find wood like that or even larger blanks that I could cut to perfectly perpendicular.
Capture.JPG

It's not that difficult to cut perfectly quartersawn material, if you can find a large enough blank. If a one piece neck is not absolutely required I like laminating. I can buy relatively inexpensive flat sawn material and rip and rotate to create a laminated neck which turns into quartersawn laminates nicely..
flatsawn-to-quarterneck.JPG

Cheers Peter.
 
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nuance97

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This has not been my experience or what I have heard. There are lots of examples of even flat sawn necks. Would I recommend them, not necessarily, but I do not think Gibson gave any thought to grain orientation on most of their production guitars.

If you are using a modern truss rod you can minimize depth and width of wood being taken at the thinnest part of the neck, which will also help with strength. Also if this is not a replica and do not have strong feeling about neck angle, I would make the neck angle slightly shallower. Some of Gibson's other guitars had a 14 or even 11 degree neck angle.

Cheers Peter.
You mean headstock angle here I assume? Not neck angle
 

Sinky10

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You mean headstock angle here I assume? Not neck angle
Yes, I did indeed mean headstock angle.
Newbie mistake.
Has anyone else out there built a neck that isn't exactly been quartersawn and had success?
At the end of the day I cns ask for a refund and start again.
 

pshupe

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You mean headstock angle here I assume? Not neck angle
I think he was talking to me, and yes I meant head stock angle. "Not so" newbie mistake. ;-) I hope there aren't many guitars with a 14 degree or 11 degree neck angle. LOL

Cheers Peter.
 

Sinky10

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I think he was talking to me, and yes I meant head stock angle. "Not so" newbie mistake. ;-) I hope there aren't many guitars with a 14 degree or 11 degree neck angle. LOL

Cheers Peter.
This is a different neck blank he's found. Thoughts guys? @pshupe @nuance97 @Brek
 

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pshupe

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This is a different neck blank he's found. Thoughts guys? @pshupe @nuance97 @Brek

If those are grain lines and not saw marks then that would be considered quartersawn and a good representation of it as well. Not perfectly quarter sawn but very close.

I generally look at the end and then the faces and try and match the endgrain lines with the lines on the faces. That way you can tell the difference between the grain lines and cross cut saw marks.

Regards Peter.
 

Sinky10

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If those are grain lines and not saw marks then that would be considered quartersawn and a good representation of it as well. Not perfectly quarter sawn but very close.

I generally look at the end and then the faces and try and match the endgrain lines with the lines on the faces. That way you can tell the difference between the grain lines and cross cut saw marks.

Regards Peter.
Brilliant, thanks
 

nuance97

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Yeah that looks close enough to quarter the satisfy me
 

Wood Butcher

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Yes, I did indeed mean headstock angle.
Newbie mistake.
Has anyone else out there built a neck that isn't exactly been quartersawn and had success?
At the end of the day I cns ask for a refund and start again.
Hi,

If you look through the BOTB book, you will see there are a percentage of guitars that have either rift sawn or even close to flat sawn necks and they have all Im sure been played the hell out of for the last 60 years. So I guess the answer to your question could be ...

Gibson, since at least the 50s.

If you do a bit of googling , there are various posts on "the other site" where the topic of conversation has been the comparison of flatsawn / riftsawn necks with quartered. If I remember correctly there are some well informed people over there stating that theyve often had a preference to the riftsawn / flat sawn necks in regards to tone and playability, make of that what you will.
 

Sinky10

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I have almost finished my jig.

Next step is the angle planes for neck tenon and the pickup plane.

Question I have is which one should I do first?
 

nuance97

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I have almost finished my jig.

Next step is the angle planes for neck tenon and the pickup plane.

Question I have is which one should I do first?
Neck plane first
 

pshupe

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I have almost finished my jig.

Next step is the angle planes for neck tenon and the pickup plane.

Question I have is which one should I do first?

You have to do the neck plane first, so you can mark where the pup plane starts. I do not think it is possible the other way around? Neck plane starts 3/16" above body / top join at your neck angle. Then measure from neck end of body just beyond fret board and that is where your pup plane starts. The idea is that the fret board sits on the neck plane and then you shave a bit off the body beyond that as the pup plane. It should exit the top carve around the bridge location.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

Cheers Peter.
 
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Sinky10

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You have to do the neck plane first, so you can mark where the pup plane starts. I do not think it is possible the other way around? Neck plane starts 3/16" above body / top join at your neck angle. Then measure from neck end of body just beyond fret board and that is where your pup plane starts. The idea is that the fret board sits on the neck plane and then you shave a bit off the body beyond that as the pup plane. It should exit the top carve around the bridge location.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

Cheers Peter.
Thanks Peter and @nuance97 .
Makes sense.
I'm using @ExNihilo drawings but sometimes I need to double check the order in which things are done.
How good are those drawings!?
 

ARandall

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I've only just got back to this........but you shouldn't have been doing the carve until you got both neck and pickup planes cut......as I mentioned in this very thread well before you did the carve.

It might not make a huge difference, but these cuts remove some of the carve steps anyhow, and change the way the slope changes into the topmost wood. Trying to make decisions on carving before these important planes are cut is really asking for trouble.
 

Sinky10

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Whoops!

Just checked back and you did indeed say that. I got carried away, clearly. When I saw those curve steps I couldn't help getting stuck in to them with the orbital sander.

I shall proceed to the planes with caution. Just fine tuning my jig just now.
 

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Fingers crossed.......

You can always end up with a little less depth on the sides if you need....as in in the binding just cuts deeper into the mahogany.
What you do want to avoid is the 'Saxon burial mound' effect, where you have an abrupt transition from the slope to the top (and the recurve). It should flow and transition smoothly with curves that have 'logically transitioning' rates of change in all areas.
 

pshupe

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Thanks guys for the advice.

I guess we are all agreed that quartersawn is the strong preference. What I'm not sure on yet is how much a difference it makes to be almost quartersawn. I get that it won't be quite as strong.

I've asked the vendor to have another look to see if he has anything closer to a true quartersawn blank. If not, I might have to take the nearly version

Although I want to get as close to a '59 as possible, in not that hung up about neck angle. If shaving a couple of degrees makes it stronger, it won't bother me in the slightest.

Thanks all.
I thought I would re-visit this. Back in the day Gibson did not care about the grain orientation of the neck. There may be someone here that would know off the top of their head how many bursts had quartersawn necks. I doubt very many would have. I have heard people say that flat sawn necks have better tone as well. IMO I would use a quartersawn, or close to, neck just because it should be more stable. Wood is wood and there is no guarantee.

Cheers Peter.
 

pshupe

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Fingers crossed.......

You can always end up with a little less depth on the sides if you need....as in in the binding just cuts deeper into the mahogany.
What you do want to avoid is the 'Saxon burial mound' effect, where you have an abrupt transition from the slope to the top (and the recurve). It should flow and transition smoothly with curves that have 'logically transitioning' rates of change in all areas.
Not sure how cutting the plane after sanding the carve would affect anything? The starting reference point for the neck plane should be a height from the top join. In theory you should be able to do it before the carve steps or after sanding the carve without any difference. Maybe I am missing something?

Cheers Peter.
 

nuance97

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Not sure how cutting the plane after sanding the carve would affect anything? The starting reference point for the neck plane should be a height from the top join. In theory you should be able to do it before the carve steps or after sanding the carve without any difference. Maybe I am missing something?

Cheers Peter.
I agree...it’s 6 of one a half dozen the other. Personal preference really
 


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