Music Theory 101

maco

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It doesn't take much to confuse me,so I have a question on ninth chords. Is a dominate ninth the 135 flat 7 and the nine? Or is that the major ninth. how do they differ?
 

jonesy

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maco

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Jonsey, thanks for trying to help. I didn't get all the answers from those sites. I thought about my original question though. The difference between a dominate and Major ninth is the 7th is not flatted in the Major, I think.
Going further, it seems like if you want to talk about flating or sharping,the dominate ninth, one would say a 7th #9 or 7th flat nine, I believe.
Now, when it comes to add NINE, to say a domiant 7th, is one of the notes dropped? Say the fifth?
 

jonesy

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Jonsey, thanks for trying to help. I didn't get all the answers from those sites. I thought about my original question though. The difference between a dominate and Major ninth is the 7th is not flatted in the Major, I think.
Going further, it seems like if you want to talk about flating or sharping,the dominate ninth, one would say a 7th #9 or 7th flat nine, I believe.
Now, when it comes to add NINE, to say a domiant 7th, is one of the notes dropped? Say the fifth?
I am a little confused by exactly what you are asking but a Jazz chord would have the b7 add 9 and the Hendrix chord would have the b7th #9 giving a totally different sound with "tension". As the Jazz 9th is mellow sounding. You can still have the 3rd or 5th in either voicing or drop them. Hope that helps. If Hu chimes in he might be able to explain it in another way to you that will help you understand it better. :)

Hendrix #9 chord

 

maco

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Thanks Jonsey, Guess I'm not keeping it simple. Your helping me though. Yes, I see my questions are blurry. I'm going to absorb this ninth thing for a bit and get back to you if it's not clear. Thanks again for the Aloha.
 

chunktone

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Kinda late to the party. This may have already been brought up as I did not read all 24 pages of prior posts. One of the things that I found helpful when beginning to focus on theory as it applies to the fingerboard is not looking at a new scale as just that, but rather look at what you already know, and how it's altered to be the new scale you're learning. For example, most people are familiar with the E minor pentatonic scale. If you want to learn the aeolian mode or natural minor, take your familiar pentatonic and add a F# and C and you have your aeolian mode. This approach has helped me a lot over the years.
 


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