Mountain bike rim repair question for MLP bike enthusiasts.

rogue3

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Lots of great advice,you seem to be on the right track.i won't even add my 2 cents,'cause its all been said.Ride that sucker!
 

NRBQ

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(not bothering to read thread) so, any rim job references yet? on a tranny?
there..thats done.
yep trued up wheels are a pleasure. now that you have a good baseline, its easy to keep them that way. you can actually tune the spokes by tapping with a wrench and getting all the tension the same by the note they play. :cheers2:
When I posted the thread in earnest, the "rim job" aspect never occurred to me, which is odd because the smutty side of things is normally the first thing to pop into my mind. Fortunately the guys came thru again by thinking on their feet and chipping in accordingly.
 

NRBQ

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Lots of great advice,you seem to be on the right track.i won't even add my 2 cents,'cause its all been said.Ride that sucker!
Yes everyone's advice has be greatly appreciated, I knew there were a bunch of bicycle people here so it's worked out great. The wheels are in the shop and I should be able to ride sometime Tuesday.
 

NRBQ

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Wow that was fast, just got a call from the bike shop and the rims are ready for pickup. Dropped them off yesterday and they said Tuesday, that's impressive. The total for both wheels is $34 so about $17 for each tire, that seems like a fair price to me. They said it would be around $15 each, so I'm very happy with the final bill. I'll either pick them up today or Monday. The shop is fairly close to home so I'll probably take a lyft, bring the bike and ride it home to get reacquainted with it.
 

TheX

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I just started 9 days off, on the trails at sun up. I hope you enjoy the bike!!! It really is a great activity.

scalpel-9-28-19.jpg
 

NRBQ

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I just started 9 days off, on the trails at sun up. I hope you enjoy the bike!!! It really is a great activity.

View attachment 409906
That's a great looking bike, although the one sided front shock still....shocks me! I know that it's strong and saves much weight, but it just looks so odd, and the person within me that craves symmetry just can't get used to the look. I know from personal experience that a hard tail bike is ill equipped to handle the advanced trails that riders transverse today. All kinds of things have changed since I bought mine, the tires are bigger (and by the looks of yours not even the same size anymore) the shocks front and back have much more range. I'm sure it's all lighter and stronger, and I'm sure the list of innovations and improvements is endless.

Like I said before, I'm just wanting to tool around the neighborhood with minimal off roading, but I still want to be able to easily go from the road, to the sidewalk, to the grass or a trail, or whatever comes up. In an semi urban environment I need to be able to pop over a curb with a quick leap to avoid cars and such, so my lovely Gary Fisher yesteryear bike should provide the same level of competence it did when I first got it. Even though it's older, nothing has changed, it's in great shape and still the same bike. I'm excited to mosey around and once I'm on I'll be in no great hurry.

I'm Goin Mobile.

 
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TheX

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I think you'd be (pleasantly) surprised just how much abuse your bike will take.
 
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PeteK

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I'd take it to a shop and have a full tune up done if it hasn't been ridden in a while and is missing some spokes. The shop here would do that for under $100.
 

NRBQ

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I think you'd be (pleasantly) surprised just how much abuse your bike will take.
Well the last time I rode an advanced trail it wasn't the bikes ability to take the abuse as much as it was my back. Truthfully it didn't take long to realize that the bike was over matched by the terrain. There was a great need for the back end to have some give and flexibility, and the hard tail gave none. I felt like I was riding a bike from another era. I came away feeling beaten up, where as my buddy who had a nice dual suspension had no issues at all. Well other than he caught a tree limb and had a vicious wipe out, which had nothing to do with the bike. Maybe it was the booze, or the pot, or the mushrooms, maybe even the meth that contributed to his accident, I don't know, I was way to high to remember or care for that matter.
Although I do remember thinking the crimson red was really pretty.
 
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LPCM&BFG

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I'm trying to put my mountain bike back on the road for riding around the neighborhood. It's been quite some time since it's been ridden, and I noticed that it won't spin freely because the rims (mostly back but front too) are out of alignment and they rub against the brakes. Of course they're not disc brakes, just the traditional type. My question is, it is cost effective or even possible to take it to a bike shop to have them adjusted? I haven't called a shop yet but have read differing opinions on the subject. I've read it's just a matter of adjusting the spokes (a couple of which are broken off) and have also read, that they need to be replaced with new rims. It's a 24 speed bike, with mid level rims, not high end, but not cheapy either. I have no idea of they are also out of round, but the alignment doesn't appear to be extreme, although it won't spin all the way around before catching the brake and stopping the wheel from spinning.

I'm hoping for some sage advice from anyone here that might be in the know. Thanks.
Can I ask the brand / model?


If there is a reputable bicycle shop with a good mechanic, I recommend you take it there. I cannot stress enough the necessity of it being a good mechanic. Depending on how old your bike is, the quality of the components, and how long it has been sitting, you might need to replace:

- Innertubes (these dry up and loose elasticity, meaning you'll get a flat rather quickly)

- Tyres: depending on the age and quality, these can actually start to come apart, or lose grip if dried out. Be careful of a large amount of "cracking" on the side wall, this can mean failure / a flat.

- Chain may or may not be buggered. If it's rusty, change it.

- Your bottom bracket might need greasing.

- Your cassette will definitely need to be lubed.

- Your brake pads may be dried out and not work well.

- Your brake cables may be rusty, meaning you could snap it just when you need it the most.

- A few broken spokes will mean your wheel will be out of alignment, which can make hitting the brakes a lot of fun.

- Truing a wheel (adjusting the spokes to the wheel is in true) is a MAJOR PAIN IN THE ASS TO DO (ask me how I know) and requires special little spoke tools and a special stand to check the trueness of the wheel.

- As you are using rim pads, you may need to clean and re-surface the braking surface, as any oil/grease will make braking nigh on impossible. this is usually done with alcohol and then a gummi with an abrassive in it (Mavic makes a good one).

I could go on....

Odds are, taking this old bike for repair will end up cost more than buying a new one. So ask for a quote first.
 

KP11520

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Happy Trails...... to you!

Or enjoy..... The Long and Winding Road!

Or Both! (just not at the same time) LOL

And ride by those "electric" peeps with your nose HIGH in the air. :facepalm:
 

NRBQ

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Can I ask the brand / model?


If there is a reputable bicycle shop with a good mechanic, I recommend you take it there. I cannot stress enough the necessity of it being a good mechanic. Depending on how old your bike is, the quality of the components, and how long it has been sitting, you might need to replace:

- Innertubes (these dry up and loose elasticity, meaning you'll get a flat rather quickly)

- Tyres: depending on the age and quality, these can actually start to come apart, or lose grip if dried out. Be careful of a large amount of "cracking" on the side wall, this can mean failure / a flat.

- Chain may or may not be buggered. If it's rusty, change it.

- Your bottom bracket might need greasing.

- Your cassette will definitely need to be lubed.

- Your brake pads may be dried out and not work well.

- Your brake cables may be rusty, meaning you could snap it just when you need it the most.

- A few broken spokes will mean your wheel will be out of alignment, which can make hitting the brakes a lot of fun.

- Truing a wheel (adjusting the spokes to the wheel is in true) is a MAJOR PAIN IN THE ASS TO DO (ask me how I know) and requires special little spoke tools and a special stand to check the trueness of the wheel.

- As you are using rim pads, you may need to clean and re-surface the braking surface, as any oil/grease will make braking nigh on impossible. this is usually done with a gummi with an abrassive in it (Mavic makes a good one)

I could go on....

Odds are, taking this old bike for repair will end up cost more than buying a new one. So ask for a quote first.
It's a 1997 Gary Fisher "Paragon" with upgraded parts throughout. The bike is in very good shape, it's been indoors within a climate controlled area. The shop has already taken care of the wheels, checking the tires and the tubes, the hub and they replace a couple spokes and aligned the rim. The components are older but high quality, the best I could buy at the time. The chain isn't rusty although I'll have them oil it when I get the wheels. The front shock is in good shape and the brake cables and pads seem to be in fine shape as well. Even though it's been a while since it's been out and about, it was always well taken care of, so I don't feel any need to replace it with a new bike. I'll have them look it over when I bring it in, but I'm not anticipating anything major needing to be done, other than the wheels (which are already for pickup) it should be pretty much roadworthy.

These pics aren't of mine, but it's the same thing with different parts, I found them hanging around the intranet. There's another post on here with a pic that lists the parts that I changed out when I bought new. I've always thought it's a good looking bike, which so far hasn't had the draw with the chicks I was promised by the salesperson. Tear.
gary_fisher-paragon-01-web-750x500.jpg
1998GF_Paragon_sm.jpg
gary_fisher-paragon-11-web-750x500.jpg
 
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LPCM&BFG

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Ah, nice bike! Always loved Gary Fishers, until Trek minimised the brand...

Ok, sounds like it should be on OK shape. Deore XT is good stuff.

One other thing to check: the seals on the tops of the fork tubes where the stanchions enter. If these have perished, then it will let dirt/water in which can lead to a shortened life of the fork.

One other thing, before going for a ride, flip the bike upside down and make sure the derailleurs work (the back being more important than the front). If either slip off or became derailed when on the smallest or largest ring, take it to the bike shop to have the derailleurs checked for their stopping points (this is fiddly to do if you aren't experienced).

Other than that, I can only recommend you also invest in a new helmet and some gloves! (I once went down on the road bike at 35kph. hit my head, but the helmet saved me from being a vegetable (the side was completely destroyed). Granted, my left leg, knee, forearm were in rather bad shape, as well as the hematoma on my thigh...
 

TheX

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XT components are no joke, damn near top of the heap (except for XTR) for many years.
 

NRBQ

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Ah, nice bike! Always loved Gary Fishers, until Trek minimised the brand...

Ok, sounds like it should be on OK shape. Deore XT is good stuff.

One other thing to check: the seals on the tops of the fork tubes where the stanchions enter. If these have perished, then it will let dirt/water in which can lead to a shortened life of the fork.

One other thing, before going for a ride, flip the bike upside down and make sure the derailleurs work (the back being more important than the front). If either slip off or became derailed when on the smallest or largest ring, take it to the bike shop to have the derailleurs checked for their stopping points (this is fiddly to do if you aren't experienced).

Other than that, I can only recommend you also invest in a new helmet and some gloves! (I once went down on the road bike at 35kph. hit my head, but the helmet saved me from being a vegetable (the side was completely destroyed). Granted, my left leg, knee, forearm were in rather bad shape, as well as the hematoma on my thigh...

I'm definatly going to buy a new helmet, since I've moved to my new house I haven't seen it, so that's a must have. As I mentioned I don't like the thumb shifters so I bought the very best grip shifters I could find at the time. They had to be ordered; they are the SRAM ESP 9.0 and included the grip shift, the derailleur, and the brake levers. I love the grip shift method, but I'm sure I'm in the minority. I'm a drummer and much like buying the best drum pedal and hihat stand you can buy (the hardware with moving parts) I felt like the money aught to be put into those parts to insure the highest level of performance. The grip shift is just right for me and they I like to operate the bike, maybe not what a pro would want but perfect for me, which is all that matters. The front shock was upgraded to a Rock Shox long travel Judy XC. BTW the rubber seals are in perfect shape, they haven't dried out and everything inside remains clean. Although it might need to be lubricated, I'm going to ask about that when I'm at the shop, but the shock seems to be in fine shape. At the time I upgraded the crank to a Sugano mighty 500X which was a little lighter than what came with the bike and was a cheap upgrade. Changed out the seat to something comfortable, and I use pedals that allow me to wear sneakers, I hate those clip/bike shoes combo, I like to ride for fun, which might include getting off the bike. I never dressed in spandex bike garb, just regular shorts and a t shirt etc.

The two big things I did that really worked for the way I ride was changing out the handlebar and stem with a Trans X Components riser bar, and a stem that angled upward instead of straight out. Both of those changes combined really made the riding position much more comfortable. The stem is really short as part of what they called at the time "Genesis" a geometry where they shortened the front end/stem and lengthened the tail area. They sold that shit like it was a new revolution to biking, who knows, but the bike does ride very well in pretty much most conditions, steep downhill riding feels very stable, which was part of the reason they altered the proportions. It's all marketing to be sure, but still it's a very stable bike under reasonable conditions. Like I said before, I really thought thru what I wanted in a bike and I made sure to be very careful and thoughtful about the component and part changes I made. I customized it to a high degree motivated by what I like and how I ride. It's all old stuff now, but it's still a light and agile bike that's really comfortable to ride.
 
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LPCM&BFG

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Nothing wrong with your setup! Hope you have fun riding it!
 

slug_maine

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Nice old hardtail. I'm still riding a 1990 hardtail that came with a rigid fork, I wish I never put a suspension fork on the front, I prefer slow technical stuff. Part of what drew me to the sport in 1990 was the simplicity of the equipment, then it got complicated.
 

LPCM&BFG

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@LPCM&BFG, why would you line a cassette? Is this a mountain bike thing? I've never done it to a road bike.

Are you taking about where it mounts to the hub?
Line a cassette? I think I said lube..... (ie: spray a bit of chain lubricant on it if it's really old)

Other than that, aligning the derailleur to the cassette with the stop points so as the chain does not jump off the cassette..

(if any of this sound odd, sorry, I am usually speaking in French about bicycles.... have to translate it to English in my head...)
 


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