Mountain bike rim repair question for MLP bike enthusiasts.

NRBQ

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I'm trying to put my mountain bike back on the road for riding around the neighborhood. It's been quite some time since it's been ridden, and I noticed that it won't spin freely because the rims (mostly back but front too) are out of alignment and they rub against the brakes. Of course they're not disc brakes, just the traditional type. My question is, it is cost effective or even possible to take it to a bike shop to have them adjusted? I haven't called a shop yet but have read differing opinions on the subject. I've read it's just a matter of adjusting the spokes (a couple of which are broken off) and have also read, that they need to be replaced with new rims. It's a 24 speed bike, with mid level rims, not high end, but not cheapy either. I have no idea of they are also out of round, but the alignment doesn't appear to be extreme, although it won't spin all the way around before catching the brake and stopping the wheel from spinning.

I'm hoping for some sage advice from anyone here that might be in the know. Thanks.
 
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efstop

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It shouldn't be expensive, it is just a couple of spokes and an adjustment. As long as the wheel itself isn't bent. Adjusting the spokes should take care of minor wobble. Also, make sure that the axle is centered properly on each side of the rim.

I'd ask the local shop for a quote. It's something they do all the time.
 

TheX

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Yep, have a shop look at it, and if you want to get more into riding learn to do it. It really isn't difficult.
 

NRBQ

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^ Thanks for the info guys, I don't think the rims are bent, just a little out of line so I think I'll call or stop by the local shop and see if they can re attach the spokes and align them for me. I'd rather not buy new rims for something that is considered a minor adjustment/repair. Thanks again, I'm on it.
 
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efstop

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If it's been years, the shop should pull the axles to repack the bearings. 10 min job.
 

TheX

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Search for GMBN on YouTube, one of my favorite channels. They have a LOT of videos to help do basic bike maintenance.
 

KP11520

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Is the rim warped or just positioned in the fork improperly?

If it's the latter, Bring it to a shop? Ridiculous.

Loosen it at the axle where it's placed in the fork notches, but keep it snug.

Move the axle position around slightly until it spins freely and tighten.

Most of the time, bottoming both sides of the axle into the fork notches gets you centered and on track.

If the rim itself is warped, they can adjust the spokes usually enough to get it right if it's not bad. Or you could just buy a new wheel assembly.

Just don't go stupid overboard new assemblies to ride around the neighborhood. Price should be in perspective.
 
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NRBQ

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Just dropped the wheels off, I'll pick them up Tuesday, they're going to check everything out, replace a spoke or two and make sure it's all running smoothly. I did make sure they were both seated correctly when I spun them. Like I said, I'm just going to tool around the neighborhood, nothing hardcore, just steady as she goes. BTW it's a black Gary Fisher Paragon, the year they used that hippie trippie logo. It's a front suspension bike that's now over 20 years old, but it's still in great condition.

I customized it to my liking when I bought it. I replaced the horrible seat that came with it with a really nice comfortable seat. Had them install the best grip shift/derailleur/brake handle combo I could get. I hated those stock thumb shifters, still do. Installed handle bars with an upward rise and a stem that went up at an angle as well. I wanted to be able to ride in a comfortable seating position and not always be hunched over. Upgraded the front shock and replaced the click on pedals with ones that had a sort of cage so I could wear my sneakers instead of riding shoes. And finally I found these great tires that that were slick in the middle, but studded on the edges so I could go off and on road with ease depending on where I was. The guy that owned the bike shop did it all for a great price, he loved it when people built their bikes to suit, a tinker a tailor, custom fit for me. I created the perfect bike for me and the way I like to ride. Fun, easy to ride, comfortable, aggressive when I wanted it to be, light, I spent a lot of time deciding just what I wanted in a bike. \


This one isn't mine, but it's the same model and year.
gary_fisher-paragon-01-web-750x500.jpg
 

TheX

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Any Austin area peeps that want to get into mountain biking, hit me up. There are a lot of us here.
 

NRBQ

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^ I apologize for that, it was like low hanging fruit. Again I apologize if that joke left a bad taste in your mouth. :rofl:
 

SGeoff

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(not bothering to read thread) so, any rim job references yet? on a tranny?
there..thats done.
yep trued up wheels are a pleasure. now that you have a good baseline, its easy to keep them that way. you can actually tune the spokes by tapping with a wrench and getting all the tension the same by the note they play. :cheers2:
 




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