Modern Car Theft

six-string

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This is a pet peeve of mine so pardon the rant.
Disclaimer: I have NOT had my vehicle stolen (yet) but it is on the top of the list of models of most stolen cars at the moment.

So as you may have read/heard, car theft has become a massive criminal enterprise over the past few years.
No longer are cars being stolen by random thieves looking to 'chop' them, or kids for 'joy-rides'.
In fact, most cars stolen now are new or nearly new and are targeted thefts by very organized criminal gangs working with precision and a LOT of help. Clearly there is a 'pipeline' that involves insider info and cooperation from various government agencies and officials as well as insiders in the auto industry. It is a multi-billion dollar per year business.
And just like the drug trade, big money is a temptation to a lot of people.

Latest statistics here show over 4000 new or new-ish Honda CRV vehicles have been stolen in this province over less than 5 years. That amounts to 800+ per year and over $23,000,000 in value just for that one particular model. Of course lots of other cars like Lexus, Toyotas and trucks like the Ford F150, Ram, etc are being targeted too.

So this is the usual deal- a team (usually 2 or 3) pull up outside a home that has a targeted car or truck in the laneway. Sometimes the car can be in the garage, even if the garage is locked it is an easy break in.
One thief has a laptop or other device and using a program can hack the cars auto lock system and ignition in a matter of seconds. Sometimes they can read the codes from your car keys inside the house if they are within range. But some don't even need that anymore.

Thief jumps in the car and has the ignition hacked in minutes or less and simply drives off with the car and his buddies leading the way. Even though many of these crimes are caught on doorbell or home security cameras, the cops usually say their is little they can do and they seldom recover the stolen vehicles. They tell the owner, call your insurance company, the car is on its way out of the country for sale overseas.

So here's where the questions start-
How do the thieves know exactly what address to go to, to find a new or nearly new vehicle to steal?
Well they must have information from either the License Bureau (MTO/DMV) or from auto dealers who sold the car etc.
How do they have the computer software to hack into that specific cars lock and ignition system?
Well obviously they must have got it from someone in the auto industry either a dealer or mechanic or someone with access to the software and codes used to set security systems for cars.
When they take the car, what happens next?
Well it is usually put into a shipping container and onto a truck and then taken to a shipping port to go on a ship outbound to another country.
How is that possible?
Someone must have contacts within the trucking industry who are willing to accept illegal loads and know how to fudge their log books and get around inspection stations etc and get their load to the shipping port.
Once at the shipping port, they must have phony paperwork that can pass inspection (or inside contacts at Customs control) to sign off on the container approved for Export, including whats in the container, where it came from, where its going, registration of ownership, proof any taxes and license fees were paid etc. etc.
Then the container goes on a ship...well ships don't just accept any old tin can that shows up. They require forms, paperwork, payments, description of cargo, value for insurance, origin and destination etc. etc.
Then of course once the ship reaches its destination the cargo must be approved, inspected blah blah before it is allowed to be off-loaded etc. Gov't officials will be involved.

Recently 5 gov't employees at the License bureau in Toronto area were arrested and charged with falsifying registration and ownership papers for stolen vehicles. That's just one office.
Several busts recently have caught groups engaging in doctoring and/or replacing VINs (vehicle identification numbers). but its the tip of the iceberg.

What nobody talks about is that it is the consumer who pays for all this. The insurance companies who pay out to replace stolen vehicles simply spread the costs around to all their customers through higher premiums. So no matter how good a driver you are, or how long you are 'claims free' you are paying for someone else's stolen vehicle.
 

Juan Tumani

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it would be OK with me if car thieves got the same punishment horse thieves did in the old west...just sayin.
Personally, I just hate thieves across the board. I don't really care what they take, if they steal it's game over in my books. Everyone is lucky I don't run things. It's not that I lack compassion, it's that I don't think thieves deserve any.

There's a difference between opportunistic thieves and career criminals. I understand what impulse control issues are and I understand that "Desperate times call for desperate measures" but don't accept them as an excuse.

For career criminals just think about what could've been accomplished if the time and energy were to have been used productively.

If I ever caught someone in the act of stealing from me I suspect I would go to jail.
 
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Fret Hopper

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Screenshot_2022-11-16-19-48-47-71_40deb401b9ffe8e1df2f1cc5ba480b12.jpg

This ad showed up while reading this thread.
 

MenaceMartin

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In the UK at least, a lot of car theft is done using a piggy-back technique on keyless entry/start systems. They boost (or take a copy of) the signal from your car keys. For instance, car is parked in driveway in front of home, your keys are in your home near your front door. They use a tablet or computer to pick up and boost the signal from your key to the car. Open car, jump in, start it, and gone.

A lot of folks who have their car parked near their house store their keys in a faraday box/pouch now to block the signal. That way it would be very difficult to steal a keyless, immobilised car.

This is a video of the scumbags in action...

 
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rogue3

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I stick a key into my car door, turn it right(or is it left?) , and it opens. it starts when i put said key into the ignition, and turn it. It is a beautiful 17 tear old Honda Pilot. Fast as lightning, a little distressed, like a lightly distressed Murphy Lab Lester. The motor is just coming into it's prime. Almost zero rust. Thieves can't steal it, because they don't know how to.
They have lost the knowledge in their rush to move forward...technologically speaking.:rofl:
 

Tim Plains

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I see constant car theft posts on my local Facebook community pages, nine Ram's were stolen within a week in a span of around six blocks. People keep replying with we need more police but I don't see an increased police presence on the street doing anything because they can't be on every single street. Me, I think the solution for this, and half of our problems, is more control / enforcement at the ports.
 

Fret Hopper

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When I first heard of how thieves could steal modern cars with the key fob tech, I made a mental note to not buy a car with that technology.

I think sometimes old tech - key, kill switch, and manual transmission, could really slow down car theft.

When I had my Factory 5 Cobra it had an electrical cutoff, and a fuel shut-off, plus a manual T-5. Only thing I couldn't prevent is if someone wanted to flatbed the car, but they would have had to get it out of my garage first.
 

rcole_sooner

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I had a truck stolen ... old school, back in 95 ... they broke the window (the door was unlocked), and they broke the steering column (they didn't hot-wire, but it was amature according to the report) ... didn't hear anything for 2 weeks ... the, um, maximum insurance payoff days.

They found it ... wrapped around a tree. Would not total it, just a few $$ under ... but admitted they couldn't check the engine/transmission condition since the fane was pushed into the radiator.

I had not seen the truck yet at this point.

I argued that surely there would be engine damage ... to no avail.

long, long, long, story short-ish ... at this point. :laugh2:

I opt'ed for the insurance pay-off and what a salvage yard would pay me for my truck.

Just about $1,600 in '95 $$$ short of what blue book said.

Meh!

I. Hate. F-n. Car theifs!!!


The biggest loss, was my oil-field lunch box and the collection of stickers on it. I imagine it was rotting in a bar-ditch somewhere.
 

PeteK

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Long before he was stealing the Declaration of Independence, Nicolas Cage had to steal 50 cars in 24 hours, or his brother would be killed. He had the help of the best car thieves in the business.

BruisedPerkyGlobefish-max-1mb.gif


Thieves know how to thieve. I don't think it's some insider conspiracy.
 

Roxy13

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I'm guessing the box or pouch for the key fob wouldn't do me any good since my truck still requires an actual key to start it? The fob would only unlock it.
 

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