Modding vintage guitars

Roxy13

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Same. And one seemed like it had been glued into place and and exploded when I tried to get it out.
Yeah, that guitar of mine was a barrel of laughs :( Let's put it this way, the only parts still original are the body, neck and fretboard. The tuners were so corroded inside you needed vise grips to turn them. The ABR bridge was completely frozen to the posts. The pickup ring screws that did not fully disintegrate were stuck to the point I had to cut the rings up to get at them. Every single metal thing was eaten up by rust or green and black biohazard gunk. Even after I removed the old frets that scary crap was ground into the binding and I had to clean and sand it all off.
 

keys88

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I have a Supro Sahara from the 1960's that I've modded a bit. It's probably worth something around $1k, so it wasn't like I was destroying a super valuable collectible. When I got it the overall tone was very warm and muffled. I replaced the top part of the wooden bridge with a tune-o-matic style bridge that has synthetic bone saddles. It's still a floating bridge, but the synthetic bone adds more snap to the notes. I also figured out how to open up the Res-O-Glass body to replace the old pots with new 500k values and a no-load tone pot. It rips now.
 

Oranjeaap

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I usually go by this rule: If it's 100% original, or easily restored to 100% original, I tend not to do mods.
The people that care about guitars being original generally don't care if it is 95% or 70% original, to them everything below 100% is unoriginal and thus affects value. With a future sale in mind I don't alter guitars that are 100% original.
So if I want to modify a guitar I usually just buy something that already has some changes, or is in really poor condition, or both.
Ofcourse if we're talking very cheap guitars here it really doesn't matter what you do with it.

I have a Greco EG700 in really good condition, but I guess at some point the strapbutton screws lost their grip, instead of filling the hole the owner just drilled new holes next to the old ones. On a guitar that is perfect condition that little alteration really sticks out, I can't believe why anyone would take that aproach.
 

efstop

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My 2013 '50s Tribute GT might have become a vintage guitar sometime in the future, but I have already modded it. I shined up the satin finish and replaced all the plastics and all hardware except the tuners and bridge. P-90s were replaced with mini humbuckers, a guard and a vibrato arm were added. It wasn't an expensive guitar at the time. It isn't likely I will ever get back the money I spent, but I have a fat necked LP with minis, so I'm good.
 

zdoggie

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you said it in your open , dont do anything permanent you want to be able to put it back stock for resale purposes
I don't have any vintage guitars ,but I'll change things ,for my taste , but be able to put them back to stock configuration

zdog
 

zeneffect

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I have a couple of old tokais. Ls60, ls100, tlc80, and a tokai made mseeker. What I can tell you is that I prefer my greco egf850 over all of them.

My 60 is an 81, my 100 is a 78. If I were to swap the pickups, I'd prefer the 60 honestly. The gotoh don't do it for me. Neck carve feels nearly identical between the 2, fit and finish is excellent. Hell they even pretty much look the same minus some headstock script. Minus nibs, Nitro (and I have suspicions and possibly of Nitro overcoat on the 60 due to color line and feel) its the same guitar. The seam on the 2 piece back is so nicely matched it looks like 1. Nothing wrong with the 50s and 60s at all, and they are getting just as collectable.

The pcb was the same between the 2, I believe the pots may not be 500k in the ls100 (def are in the 60) The pickup selector switch was different, ls100. It was more vintage style and had a metal cap over the back, however both were high quality. Green chicklet caps in both, DiMazio PAF in the 100. Tailpiece was aluminum on both with same markings. Only difference in tuners was single ring vs double. TOM bridge was the same on both. Nut is bone on both. I can compare headstock angles if you want.

Why do I prefer the greco? Neck is chunkier and I don't know.... it just has something extra i can't define other than "mojo." Not saying go get a greco, but you find that "one" where you aren't expecting it and it will make you open your eyes a little more. Don't get hung up on a brand thinking "its the best"
Chicken/egg scenario.

Without the internet, NO ONE would be able to order them either. BEING counterfeit, trade mark infringing etc, NO magazine, or legacy method of advertising would allow them to advertise them for sale (or would be court ordered to),

So, no internet, no proliferation of these fakes.
Nose oil works well.
I have a Greco EG700 in really good condition, but I guess at some point the strapbutton screws lost their grip, instead of filling the hole the owner just drilled new holes next to the old ones. On a guitar that is perfect condition that little alteration really sticks out, I can't believe why anyone would take that aproach.
Happens quite often actually. Guess the toothpick trick doesn't involve enough power tools. I thought about plugging them but meh. I can overlook them for a while.
 

Sharp

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My buddy has a ‘64 strat that he has gigged since the late seventies. It’s been refretted 3 times, had a new bridge/trem installed and pots replaced as needed. It plays like a dream. It’s all about keeping it in service.
 

PeteNJ75

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Do this. Saves hundreds in tuners you just have to pull off to put the stock ones back on when you sale it.
Seriously had Hondo LP with the bolt in neck and the trap tuners were so bad you could hardly fret a note without it going out of tune. I learned how to string lock on it because I didn’t want to spend any money on it. I got it for free, cleaned it up and once I did this, it was playable. I ended up liking it a bit. Gave it to a younger musician, taught him how to string lock and he still plays the crap out of it. No tuner swaps, though the fretboard has been re-radiused (to an honest 14 where as before it was 12-16 but not consistent) refretted with super jumbos, swapped the saddles and nut and he found a late 70’s set of all slug Humbuckers, we wired it up with CTS pots and some orange drop caps. Still no need for tuners. He purposely keeps it like that. :dunno:

I just had to say I think you have the best screen name I’ve ever seen on MLP.
 

J-Dizzle

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Outside of the real high end stuff, I dont think it really matters.

And a lot of these MIJ guitars are so old some of the parts are worn out and need replacing to make the guitars actually playable.

Don't forget these guitars were mostly owned by actual gigging musicians not dickhead lawyers and bankers kept in storage.

But mods dont really add value either. if you swap pickups etc and still intend to sell the guitar later on, its a good idea to keep the old pickups and reinstall them when selling the guitar.
 
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