Mid Seventies Greco any good :-)

BKS

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I am looking at a 75/76(according to seller) greco les paul. Interesting looking guitar with several dings and so. I have no idea about Greco especially these older ones. Thought these mid Seventies were bolt on from greco that far goes my knowledge. And i know there are several on here that know a lot more than dumbo me ;)
So anyone can tell me about it.
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BKS

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Neck pickup is original, bridge was replaced.
 

brokentoeswalker

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The ones with the tummy cut were a Japanese guitarist sig model. I can never remember the name though. I don't have any mid 70's Grecos so i can't comment further.

Good luck
 
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Roxy13

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It looks to me like there is a solid maple center seamed cap? Hard to see in the pic but if that is the case it's not hollow at all.

It's Norlin type consruction with a pancake body and 3 p maple neck. I have 2 Arias like this and I really like them. Neither of mine are heavy, so that can be a concern with this one you are looking at. Mine are both around 9.25 lb. So really, typical singlecut weight.

If those specs are ok with you and the price is right, go for it!
 

Greco

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JamesT

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These models are pretty low end on specs. Greco took a big step forward in construction specs as the decade ended. There are some cool and funky sounding guitars to be found in the mid 70s but they aren’t highly sought after or particularly well built.
 

Greco

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These models are pretty low end on specs. Greco took a big step forward in construction specs as the decade ended. There are some cool and funky sounding guitars to be found in the mid 70s but they aren’t highly sought after or particularly well built.
I believe ones after 75 (so 76 and further) are the ones collectors go for. 76 is a transition year as early models in 76 had different specs to 75 but late 76 are closer to ones in 77 An from further. Strange but cool imo.
 

BKS

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I have no idea wich model this is. The more i search online the more i scratch my head :laugh2:. Might even be a 74 maybe? As half way 75 the headstock logo changed. It is set neck and most were bolt on. Tho i see a lot of them with the pancake body with bellycut... But most bolt on's... So probably making this at least a mid range model, not lower end. Maybe contact him again, anything important to look at?
Original pickups are Maxon but read those were not the best in those years.
 

Roxy13

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It's not lower end or it would be bolt on and/or plywood hollow top. Ask for some better pics of the top so you can see if there is at least a center seam (or 2 seams if it's a 3p top). The ones with no seam are the plywood ones.

I would rate my 1977 SA 900 Project Series as quite possibly the best guitar I own. So I don't discount all models before 1979 despite that year being the one that most of the Grecos became very nice and desirable. And I do like my 70s Arias as I've mentioned, pancakes and maple necks and all lol. They are like my red headed stepchildren in my modest collection I guess, but I love them anyway.
 

Stinky Kitty

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I had a 77 EG600. It's construction was similar to a Norlin era single cut with two big differences. They used some kind of doweling along side the neck tenon. And it was chambered.

Try to get a pic of the neck pick up pocket looking toward the head stock. That will show if there are dowels or not.
 
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JDZ

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From here: http://www.music-trade.co.jp/GrecoHistory2.html

During the early ‘70’s, GRECO asked Mr. Hidesato Shiino (formally worked for Yamaha)
to develop the guitar producing and marketing as a consultant.
In early days, Mr. Shiino was in charge of most of guitar manufacturers not only Greco.
He consulted ELK, Guyatone, Fernandes, Kasuga and others. He contacted his old friend Mr. Shigeru Narumo (1947-2007 Mr. Narumo is grandson of founder of Bridgestone Tire, Cusin of Formal Prime Minstar, Mr. Yukio, Hatoyama); a very popular Japanese guitarist. Mr. Narumo started to supervise GRECO guitar development with Mr. Shiino. They advised GRECO to develop a better guitar than the Les Paul at a more affordable price and to scale the neck down to be more suitable for the smaller Japanese hand. Mr. Shiino conducted the factory side and made a proto type guitar for Mr. Narumo due to his required specifications in just a few days and he was very surprised with the new custom EG. He had his band members play a Gibson, a Fender and this new EG custom blindfolded and they all agreed the EG was the best of the three.

Narumo played this new EG-360 Custom on stage alternating with a Gibson. The audience was surprised to see and hear a Japanese made guitar that was as good (if not better) than the original.

Narumo’s only complaint was with the finish color which GRECO had copied from a photo of Paul Kossoff (of the rock band Free) supplied by Narumo. Kossoff was playing a No. 2 that was finished in the brown sunburst but GRECO couldn’t ascertain the color of the rear so they just furnished the sunburst on the back and neck.

Narumo’s involvement and performances provided GRECO a huge sales increase. So much so that GRECO asked Narumo to endorse GRECO exclusively. While reluctant, Narumo saw possibilities in getting his dream guitars made. In a visit to the Fujigen factory, Narumo suggested opening the rear Humbucking pickup and to contour the back much like the Stratocaster. The resulting guitar was the EG-420 and was much superior to the EG-360.

GRECO and Narumo collaborated on many models following the EG-420 and this became GRECO’s golden age of replica and clone guitars. This culminated in the EG-800 which was largely influenced by Narumo. It had the open pickups and contoured back of the 420 with higher quality wood. The EG-420 was a semi-hollow body of 6p mahogany sandwich. The new EG-800 had an ebony finger board, a solid 2p maple top and a narrow neck. The neck joint became the set neck type, too.

Officially, Narumo has said that he didn’t know anything about the EG-800. He has mentioned that he was in charge through the prototype of the EG-700 and only heard about the EG-800 several years later. Despite Narumo’s stance, the EG-800 is called the “Narumo Model” by collectors. As a side note, the EG-650 has also been called the Narumo Model. It was a semi-hollow bodied construction with other of Narumo’s suggested features. Now, we could guess the reason of their relations were not smooth, because, the middle man, Mr. Shiino was not there, He concentrated the Armature Rock Festival that time.
 
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BKS

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25 322 is the code on the back of the pickup. Weight is over 4 kilo, solid top and body, slim taper neck on the slim side... That might be a dealbreaker for me :laugh2:
Probably going to see if i can try it after he gets back....
 

Roxy13

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Ok, pickups are production line 2, 1975, March 22.
 
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BKS

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So early 75 pickups narrows it down as around mid that year the logo changed...
 

BKS

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It actually is a nice sounding guitar. He changed bridge to a dimarzio paf. I heared some recordings of the guitar.
 

LOUDTWANGER

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I have a 1980's Greco and it is outstanding. the finish is far better than my Gibson Les Paul and the playability is spot on. highly recommend getting one--and they are so much cheaper to buy.
 

Wise Guy

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I have a 1980's Greco and it is outstanding. the finish is far better than my Gibson Les Paul and the playability is spot on. highly recommend getting one--and they are so much cheaper to buy.
Did they use poly finishes back then or no?
 


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