Metallica get a taste of their own medicine

DotStudio

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Pearl Jam get made fun of for fighting Ticketmaster too.

Now everyone complains about Ticketmaster and price gouging.
Yup, acting in their own self-interest or not, going after Napster and Ticketmaster was the right move. It's not like there weren't a bunch of small bands that didn't like the thought of all their music being given away for free on Napster, it's just that they didn't have any clout. I was a teenager at the time and was pretty annoyed at Metallica, but looking back as an adult, they were in the right.
 

filtersweep

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Pearl Jam get made fun of for fighting Ticketmaster too.

Now everyone complains about Ticketmaster and price gouging.
Ticketmaster is cancer.

Paying a ‘convenience fee’ to get your ‘ticket’ online?!? GTFO!

And any show worth seeing is sold out before tickets even go on sale. WTF?!?
 

strat1701

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Ticketmaster is cancer.

Paying a ‘convenience fee’ to get your ‘ticket’ online?!? GTFO!

And any show worth seeing is sold out before tickets even go on sale. WTF?!?
Yup thanks to vendor specific 'pre sale' windows. Gone are the days of getting a good ticket meant you got your ass up way early and waited on a line. It was fun except when the tickets went on sale in winter! But even so with telephone sales starting at the same time as the stores did back in the 90's you weren't guaranteed a good seat. I waited 6hrs in line in freezing cold only to have general admission left, no floor. Other times I lucked out and got great seats. For big ass shows we'd work in shifts to save our spot, we did that for the Guns/Metallica show in '92. I think we started to line up around 11pm the night before and there were a TON already in line. $32.75 for the ticket, via ticketmaster, WITH the 'convenience fee' bought at record theatre in buffalo!
 

cjpeck

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Anyone who says there isn't any good music being made these days is full of crap and doesn't know their ass from a hole in the ground. The music industry has changed, and is still changing. It's incredibly easy these days to record and get music out in a form the popcorn munchers can listen to anywhere they go. Problem is that it's incredibly easy these days to record and get music out in a form the popcorn munchers can listen to anywhere they go. The issue is that the signal to noise ratio is far lower than it has ever been in the past; in other words, you have to sift through a whole lotta turds to find the diamonds these days. The onus is on you to spend the time and find the good stuff.
Anyone who thinks that there isn't any good music being made today (even if by 'good music' they merely mean 'music I like') is an idiot. Do you really think that there aren't any talented musicians making music right now? Get the hell outa here with the bullshit. You're just being lazy.
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And now back to your regularly scheduled thread...
 

ArchEtech

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While I think it’s fairly harsh to say that if you believe there’s no good music coming out right now you’re an idiot I can agree with some of that sentiment.

There is some good rocking music out there that’s new. Even some of our old favorite bands and personalities are still making good music.

Interestingly enough are we like a lot of the more electronica music remixes that people are producing. One of my favorite groups back in the day was as Ozric tentacles. I have no idea how to spell that. They were kind of a jam band psychedelic instrumental group and we’re doing with instruments what people are doing with garage band and other software suites now but I still like that type of music. There are gobs and gobs of interesting stuff on YouTube as much as I hate to be on YouTube.
 

Kamen_Kaiju

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Back in the day you had: books, movies, music, TV, games, for entertainment. And that was about it.

Now you have a million things competing for your attention in the palm of your hand. Music is devalued.

On top of that 20-30 years ago music was a craft that required intense dedication and 100s of hours to learn. Now you can just Google a YouTube video to teach you anything you want in 5 minutes. Youtube is filled with hundreds (thousands?) of kid shredders and people spitting out cover songs left and right.

Music and guitar is just not seen as anything special anymore. It's just a "thing". No more important than the latest tik tok video or whatever.

It's been devalued, and that's part of why the majority of people don't even want to pay for it. They think music is just a free commodity like air and everyone should have it for free.

I've given up stressing about it, it is what it is. I still find a lot of new music I like. But hardly any of it is produced in America.

Funny that countries that still value music and have a real music scene seem to be (imo) the ones producing the most interesting music.

And beyond that there's decades of backlog music I'm still discovering from the 60s and 70s.

Music is cool. Good music is better.
 

murmel

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Anyone who says there isn't any good music being made these days is full of crap and doesn't know their ass from a hole in the ground. The music industry has changed, and is still changing. It's incredibly easy these days to record and get music out in a form the popcorn munchers can listen to anywhere they go. Problem is that it's incredibly easy these days to record and get music out in a form the popcorn munchers can listen to anywhere they go. The issue is that the signal to noise ratio is far lower than it has ever been in the past; in other words, you have to sift through a whole lotta turds to find the diamonds these days. The onus is on you to spend the time and find the good stuff.
Anyone who thinks that there isn't any good music being made today (even if by 'good music' they merely mean 'music I like') is an idiot. Do you really think that there aren't any talented musicians making music right now? Get the hell outa here with the bullshit. You're just being lazy.
View attachment 520957
And now back to your regularly scheduled thread...
I wouldn't be so harsh calling these people idiots, because they probably just lost the connection to the music scene.
If you just listen to the radio, or even worse TV, you are even more lost today, than in earlier years.
But I totally agree that we have more great music around than ever before, we have the legacy of the past and all these great bands of the 2000s, 2010 and 2020s. At the moment I struggle more with finding the time to listen to all these awesome new releases.
 

redking

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There are loads of awesome music out there. Do you have Spotify? Pick a genre.

And your case: a million streams for $3000. What does that even mean? Half the shit that was popular was rammed down our throats on radio— where artists indirectly PAID for the exposure. But a million streams does not equal a million ‘sales.’ Who bought albums to listen to them once? I must have listened to some tracks hundreds of times. And now I avoid radio, and stream from my car.

Do the math: big artists receive 100s of millions of streams per song. Many songs are too weak to translate into full album sales- under the old model.... like Baby Shark.
No, I don't use Spotify because it's the worst of all of them - Big Tech combined with Record Companies that own it! I'm sure there is lots of "good" music, but there is no GREAT music being made. There are no rock bands that are important on a worldwide scale. And all these bands that are making "good" music on spotify are basically hobbyists, gaining their main source of income from other means that distracts them from being an artist and possibly becoming "great" as opposed to "ok." The ones that do live their lives as musicians and go out and tour are making the equivalent of a Manager at Michaels or less. And others who have figured out how to become independent musicians spend most of their energy hawking pedals on Youtube.
 

redking

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Dweezil Zappa created this platform, which I think has a lot of merit and potential, however we shall see if it gains mass acceptance. Basically providing a platform for artists to cut out the record companies and big tech (youtube, etc.) and go direct to their audience with everything. I hope it gains momentum.

 

cybermgk

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Now you have a million things competing for your attention in the palm of your hand. Music is devalued.

On top of that 20-30 years ago music was a craft that required intense dedication and 100s of hours to learn. Now you can just Google a YouTube video to teach you anything you want in 5 minutes. Youtube is filled with hundreds (thousands?) of kid shredders and people spitting out cover songs left and right.

Music and guitar is just not seen as anything special anymore. It's just a "thing". No more important than the latest tik tok video or whatever.

It's been devalued, and that's part of why the majority of people don't even want to pay for it. They think music is just a free commodity like air and everyone should have it for free.
IMHO the ease of accessibility has made music devalued. Or, at least, it is a major contributor. I totally agree, that having so many choices, plays into it, as well, no question.

Once, you had to make an investment, in time, as well as money, to enjoy music, Sure, there was radio. But, they knew what they were doing, they whetted the appetite. They knew how to keep that fine line that kept you wanting more. So, to enjoy the music, meant investing your time.

You would have to go to a record store, or even a place like a chain book store, or department store, even for the most popular stuff. Even if you went to a public library, to listen, took an expenditure of time. Or, you would go and listen to said music live, which was a whole other investment in time and effort. Wanted to take that new album, you spent time and money acquiring, mobile, then more time spent recording it to cassette, or buying a more mobile medium. Likewise, not having everything at your fingertips, you would physically go to a friend's to share each other's collection, borrow, etc.

All this investment in personal time, effort, and money, intrinsically makes something more valuable. It represents an expenditure of 'yourself'. As the saying goes, 'the less skin you have in the game, the less you care about the outcome'.

This started the 'disposable' approach to music. Making it so easily accessible, imho. Pumping up and glorifying the 'temporary star', and the generic look and sound, i.e. disposable performers,, solydified it.
 

ArchEtech

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I don’t think good music is devalued at all. One might argue that really good music now is a little harder to fine because of some of the reasons people have given in this thread.

People are inundated by constant commercialized music releases; Industry created artist and genres. Instant gratification YouTube influencers quick easy access.

I think when some talented people come out with new things it does get noticed it just takes a longer to find it while shifting through all the crap. A lot of the music is disposable kind of like other people have said.

John Mayer it’s kind of 2000 to 2010 but at the time he put out a lot of more pop kind of music it is a crazy blues player but He wanted to make money.

Taylor Swift inarguably has talent. I’m not a huge fan but some of her unplug stuff is actually pretty good. She has a voice and she can write catchy tunes. I wish you’d stay out of politics but pretty much no one does anymore unfortunately. She is still fairly current and relevant and plays guitar.

I’m not super into country music but certainly country music is coming out with new stuff all the time and is still very instrument and guitar-based.

Hozier made some pretty good stuff.

Royal Blood has some good songs.

The name is escaping me but if there’s that group that came out in the last five years that sounds dead onto Led Zeppelin. Even though there’s a certain clichéd Ambience about it they’re actually pretty damn good.

I actually like some of Post Malone’s Music and he’s actually a pretty capable and talented artist live particularly.

I feel like most of the songs on the radio are hip-hop dance music and that kind of half rap half singing stuff. Some of it I don’t hate. It’s been a while since I’ve spent some time on the other radio stations that play a little bit more of the modern hard rock and I probably should start doing that again.

I’m not going to deny my affinity for 70s 80s and 90s rock and heavy-metal though because that’s what made me want to play guitar.
 

strat1701

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IMHO the ease of accessibility has made music devalued. Or, at least, it is a major contributor. I totally agree, that having so many choices, plays into it, as well, no question.

Once, you had to make an investment, in time, as well as money, to enjoy music, Sure, there was radio. But, they knew what they were doing, they whetted the appetite. They knew how to keep that fine line that kept you wanting more. So, to enjoy the music, meant investing your time.

You would have to go to a record store, or even a place like a chain book store, or department store, even for the most popular stuff. Even if you went to a public library, to listen, took an expenditure of time. Or, you would go and listen to said music live, which was a whole other investment in time and effort. Wanted to take that new album, you spent time and money acquiring, mobile, then more time spent recording it to cassette, or buying a more mobile medium. Likewise, not having everything at your fingertips, you would physically go to a friend's to share each other's collection, borrow, etc.

All this investment in personal time, effort, and money, intrinsically makes something more valuable. It represents an expenditure of 'yourself'. As the saying goes, 'the less skin you have in the game, the less you care about the outcome'.

This started the 'disposable' approach to music. Making it so easily accessible, imho. Pumping up and glorifying the 'temporary star', and the generic look and sound, i.e. disposable performers,, solydified it.
Totally agree. I remember waiting for weeks for an album's release date, I'd have recorded on tapedeck the one or two tracks the radio would play and then I'd always walk downtown to Cavages records on the release day after school and bought the cassette and listened to it on my metro ride home. I still have the original cassette's of Guns' Illusion albums which had the 'offensive' advisory disclaimer sticker (yeah I have it somewhere too!) We only had one CD player in the family then and it was in the living room so I was stuck with cassettes so I could listen in my room.

Nowdays kids have no concept of waiting to get anything, let alone the latest music track from their current fave artist. Instant gratification.
 

neoclassical

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I got banned from Napster because of Metallica. I didn't care. I owned every Metallica album anyway and I still loved them. It took St Anger to make me stop buying their albums.
It took the black album to make me stop buying their stuff.
 

KSG_Standard

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YouTube and other platforms made it easier to get your music/art out to the masses...without the unnecessary gatekeepers and middlemen standing in the way. Anyone can have their music heard now for cheap. The downside may be that there’s more “junk” out there too and the way the artist gets paid or recognized has changed.
 

filtersweep

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No, I don't use Spotify because it's the worst of all of them - Big Tech combined with Record Companies that own it! I'm sure there is lots of "good" music, but there is no GREAT music being made. There are no rock bands that are important on a worldwide scale. And all these bands that are making "good" music on spotify are basically hobbyists, gaining their main source of income from other means that distracts them from being an artist and possibly becoming "great" as opposed to "ok." The ones that do live their lives as musicians and go out and tour are making the equivalent of a Manager at Michaels or less. And others who have figured out how to become independent musicians spend most of their energy hawking pedals on Youtube.
I love country music.

Trouble is, there hasn’t been a decent song written in the last 40 years.

I stand by my statement— but it just an opinion. And somehow, plenty of people are proving me wrong, because the shit today keeps selling.

Just because you don’t relate to today’s music doesn’t make it bad. Our parents hated ‘our music.’ I hate the whiny ‘mumble rap’ my kids listen to.
 

redking

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I love country music.

Trouble is, there hasn’t been a decent song written in the last 40 years.

I stand by my statement— but it just an opinion. And somehow, plenty of people are proving me wrong, because the shit today keeps selling.

Just because you don’t relate to today’s music doesn’t make it bad. Our parents hated ‘our music.’ I hate the whiny ‘mumble rap’ my kids listen to.
Bro country and mumble rap is genuinely bad. And it's not selling or making any money for the artists. Artists are surviving off other sources of income, not the recordings. They tour, they license songs to video games, they endorse sneakers and vodka, but their recordings make them next to nothing. A Billion streams pays only $300k - we can all agree that a billion streams is a shit ton of listens - the scale of that payout is way off what it should be.
 

redking

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Anyone who says that great music is still being made - name one record that has been released since say 2010 that has been a worldwide phenomenon and will go down in history as being a great record like The Joshua Tree, Back in Black, Dark Side of the Moon, Appetite for Destruction or something like that.
 

strat1701

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Anyone who says that great music is still being made - name one record that has been released since say 2010 that has been a worldwide phenomenon and will go down in history as being a great record like The Joshua Tree, Back in Black, Dark Side of the Moon, Appetite for Destruction or something like that.
I'd say probably only Adele's 21 and maybe Lady Gaga are the only two contenders for 'global phenomenon' status (used losely) but I agree, there hasn't been a Thriller, Dark Side, Appetite etc.. album since the late 80's.
 

Kamen_Kaiju

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Pop and hip hop are what's popular now. Or it's what's promoted anyway.

Pop has sounded exactly the same for 20s years. Autotuned over-produced cookie-cutter candy music.

From Britney to Beyonce to whatever it all sounds like it's made by the same person.
 

bildozr

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Pop and hip hop are what's popular now. Or it's what's promoted anyway.

Pop has sounded exactly the same for 20s years. Autotuned over-produced cookie-cutter candy music.

From Britney to Beyonce to whatever it all sounds like it's made by the same person.
That's because it is. It's a Swedish dude name Max Martin. He produces almost everything. Dude is worth like 300 something million.
 


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