McDonald's helps workers get food stamps

SteveGangi

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I do not recall that at all, especially in this area. The Carter years brought misery, and the economy exploded in the mid-late 80s.

Oh come on now. Have you EVER seen me say anything good about THAT asshole? Mister Stagflation? Mister "if you can't afford heat wear a sweater"? Mister "let's gut the military"? Jeebus Christ.

But I guarandamntee, there were a lot more homeless during the Ronnie years, and that's a fact.
 

cybermgk

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Interesting comments here. I was making near what many are advocating for minimum wage increase back in the early eighties working in a warehouse lifting boxes all night. I shouldn't have been paid that? I was able to pay rent on LI, buy a decent automobile and, get this...I was able to pay my college tuition with cash.

Because I was able to move myself out of unskilled labor into a higher paid profession, I was able to afford even greater quality of life improvement...professional development - graduate school at a private university.

I for one do have no reason to resent unskilled workers making a living wage.

...but I do have one question: The corporation does not pay these workers directly, the franchisee does. Yes? Would some care to explain to me in laymen's terms how this is managed? I'm interested.

Not an expert. And certainly do not know all the ins and outs of a McD's Franchise agreement.

But, in general, the Franchisee, pays an amount for a franchise. They either purchase a building from McDs, or another Franchisee. THis is above the 250k in liquid funds needed to get the franchise. Some have McD provide the land and building, and rent it.

Then, it is just like running your own restaurant, except, you have to use McD procedures, products (patties, buns etc), and get their advertising, training and similar help. But, you do your own payroll, etc., paid from your franchise(s) operations.
 

FrankieOliver

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Not an expert. And certainly do not know all the ins and outs of a McD's Franchise agreement.

But, in general, the Franchisee, pays an amount for a franchise. They either purchase a building from McDs, or another Franchisee. THis is above the 250k in liquid funds needed to get the franchise. Some have McD provide the land and building, and rent it.

Then, it is just like running your own restaurant, except, you have to use McD procedures, products (patties, buns etc), and get their advertising, training and similar help. But, you do your own payroll, etc., paid from your franchise(s) operations.

Thank you for your response. :)
 

Thumpalumpacus

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I hate to sound like a cold- hearted asshole, but frankly, if you possess no other marketable skills beyond the ability to flip a meat patty, then your labor isn't worth very much. Left-wing theories to the contrary, if you try to artificially raise the value of labor, you also raise the price for everything created with that labor, therefore reducing demand for that product and forcing businesses to reduce labor costs in order for the business to survive, mostly in the form of layoffs and reduced hours. Its an imperfect system we have, but free markets still work better. Acquire a marketable skill. Learn how to weld. Anything. But its on the individual to make his life better. We gotta stop asking others to do it for us.

There are other controllables in any business which can also be trimmed. As to which one in particular is chosen, that is a reflection of the priorities of its executives ... which is rather the point of this thread.
 

slapshot

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interesting you say marketable skill & use welding as an example since it's been on the way out for years thanks to the robots :hmm:
 

geochem1st

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they were swept under the carpet then

Many of them alongside train tracks, out of view for most of the public. First time I ever saw a homeless tent city was in the early 80's, while taking a train in to work. I got to see them grow and expand as the decade wore on. People that ride trains everyday seldom look at the scenery. They are lost in books, work or conversation.
 

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