Maybe a philosophical question

Jeremiah

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What was it that attracted you to this era of Gibson history? I can say for me, it was my birthday. I could see others (and really me as a secondary) wanting Norlin era gear for the great music people used these instruments to make.

So how about it, fellow Norlin-heads, what was it that attracted you, and what is it that keeps you coming back?
 

1981 LPC

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It's what I stumbled into mid 1990's being in my teens. Wanted to buy a Les Paul - new was out of the question. So second hand was the way to go - enter a then 14 year old 1981 Custom (imported from the US).

There were no internet forums where you could find out about specs.
Nobody I knew knew about specs.
I doubt many players gave two ****s about 'Vintage' vs. Norlin vs HenryJ specs.

So.... true solid body / volute / three-piece maple neck / pancake - these were terms I learned when I joined MLP.
 

jestremera

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While I don't own one from this era now, I'll always associate LP's from this era with two of my favorite players (Randy Rhoads and John Sykes, later on). They're the ones who made me want get a Les Paul. I bought my first one (Studio) in '86, sold it after a couple of years, and strayed from them for a very long time. Now I'm back and sticking with them
 

horand

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I dont get along well with newer Les Pauls. At least so far. I have tried a few and I didnt like them. In my teens Gibsons were way too expensive for me, so I played other brands. But I remembered once in the local music shop in ´74 - when the owner let me play a Deluxe and it was something quite different than the guitars I usually got my hands on. For nearly 35 years after that I kept playing other brands. Five years ago I went into a guitardealer to buy an old strat, when I saw this old and worn Les Paul on the wall. I asked if I could try it out and I knew I wasnt gonna leave the store without it. I guess that old memory from the 70´s came back to me. I still play other kind of guitars but the 70´s era Les Pauls is really something special to me, and I dont think its just nostalgia. I do appreciate both maple & mahogany necks. And I love T-Tops thru a Marshall amp.
 

ehb

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Never gave "era" or Norlin a thought. They spoke to me when I played them.
Better than other "eras"? No.
Inferior to other "eras"? No.

If it speaks to me, I buy it. I couldn't care less about era or pedigree....
 

ehb

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...and I also like TTops...
 

pmonk

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Well, since the Heritage 80 Les Paul, I have a Norlin and a Re-issue all wrapped up in one!
 

MSB

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I found a red LP that caught my eye, turned out to be an '87, so I'm barely able to be in here, but the more I researched, the more I want a deluxe with a pancake body, thick maple neck and volute.

I tend to go for the less popular stuff, so I like whole norlin stigma
 

LPPILOT

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I'm thankful....Gibson stepped up and made more LPs . I really don't care about others opinions . These were great guitars. Or else , I may never had a chance to own a 50 's LP as a teen. I had picked up a 1968 LP brochure as a young lad at the local Music store. I stared a hole though it. I knew what I wanted. :naughty:..My mom was not spending for a new one . Almost, 4 years later shopping in another city we found a used 68 GT ....barely played. She made a deal ...my Christmas present. :)
 

1969 weatherman

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some of my guitar heros played norlins luring me in that era only to find out I really connect with them...
 

b_rogers

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I got lucky and scored mine for cheap on a gun forum I used to frequent. Turned out to be the best sounding guitar I have (out of 12) and the only guitar that the volume and tone knobs dont destroy the tone. I didn't set out to get a Norlin, but I knew I didn't have the scratch for a 50's Goldtop, even a project and the price was stupid cheap due to a headstock repair...I have played quite a few over the years but I couldnt seem to get away from strats.
 

Mayuiers

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Frankly, I dislike Henry J and refuse to give my hard earned cash to him.

I freely admit Gibson is capable of making guitars that are excellent. However, many are overpriced pieces of crap brazenly touted by Henry and his minions as being the best that Gibson has ever made.

Putting my hatred of Henry to the side for a moment, I've yet to come across a late model Les Paul that has the variety of tones, the raw power, the playability, and the unique character of my '71 Norlin LP Deluxe. In fact, I've found that a surprisingly large number of Norlin guitars stand up very very well against those from any of the other Gibson eras.
 

moreles

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I'm attracted to specific guitars, not periods. I dislike Gibson's production practices from the Norlin "era" for all the usual reasons, but at the same time have found excellent individual instruments from this period. As others point out, Gibson's quality control today is nothing to brag about, either. If you like aged wood, settled and played guitars, and don't have to have exactly the same woods and specs as in '59, then there are plenty of excellent Norlins among the indifferent ones. In some ways, it's the era that intrigues me most now because I don't like overpriced instruments (current production and true "vintage") am fine with multipiece and maple necks, and love mini-hums. So while I might dream about a high-priced special LP made today, or a museum piece from '59, when I think in rational terms, I think about Norlins.
 

Progrocker111

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Its simply, i like 70s rock, progrock, hardrock and jazzrock. :)

I like many less known continental european bands, most of them played with late 60s and 70s Gibsons and since i was a child, i listened to these records. So i am familiar with the guitar tone on them and when i want to replicate it, the best way is to try it with the guitar from this era.
 

lakehaus

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For me, it was my first guitar. I bought it with my own money (layaway). It was a brand new 1976 Gibson SG Standard, which was still on the rack in 1977.

I've always loved that guitar, no matter how crappy the internet told me it was. And I never understood that because what I was holding was a quality built guitar. I get now what people refer to - electronics (mine had TarBack pickups and funky capacitors) and that funky harmonica bridge. Not to mention some of the Norlin models that came out during their reign (i.e. the Sonic). But otherwise, fit and finish - and mostly playability - are just incredible. I still think so today, and I still have that guitar, albeit dressed out now with pre-T tops and RS kit, and the ABR-1 conversion.

I've bought several Norlins over the years. Both Les Pauls I've had quickly scored as Best LP I ever owned. First it was my '82 30th Anniversary, but I traded that for something else... only after scoring its replacement as Best - a '74 LPC in white. Those two Norlins topped my R9, R8, R7, and a couple other LPs I've had.




 

Kris Ford

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For me, it was my first guitar. I bought it with my own money (layaway). It was a brand new 1976 Gibson SG Standard, which was still on the rack in 1977.

I've always loved that guitar, no matter how crappy the internet told me it was. And I never understood that because what I was holding was a quality built guitar. I get now what people refer to - electronics (mine had TarBack pickups and funky capacitors) and that funky harmonica bridge. Not to mention some of the Norlin models that came out during their reign (i.e. the Sonic). But otherwise, fit and finish - and mostly playability - are just incredible. I still think so today, and I still have that guitar, albeit dressed out now with pre-T tops and RS kit, and the ABR-1 conversion.

I've bought several Norlins over the years. Both Les Pauls I've had quickly scored as Best LP I ever owned. First it was my '82 30th Anniversary, but I traded that for something else... only after scoring its replacement as Best - a '74 LPC in white. Those two Norlins topped my R9, R8, R7, and a couple other LPs I've had.




NICE.
Where the witch hats stock on that SG? :hmm:
My '76 SG Standard has speed knobs stock..
 

grumphh

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What was it that attracted you to this era of Gibson history?

and what is it that keeps you coming back?
Nothing attracted me to this period.

One of the first good guitars i bought at some time in the mid 80's was an early 70's SG (that i have since stupidly sold) and when i got my first LP ('79 LPC) at some point in the 90's i still had no idea that there were different "periods" of Gibsons - they were all just Gibsons to me, and i wanted a black custom...

I am still not especially attracted to the period (meaning that i would not hesitate to buy gibsons from other periods, if the price were right and the guitar was good), but if there is anything special to "norlins" it is that you can get a brand name instrument with vintage mojo (i.e. authentic battered looks) for rather little money.


What i do not like is that on forums people tend to judge guitars by their pedigree rather than by individual virtue and often try to make their purchase feel better to themselves by slagging others instrument choices.
The absurd necessity of having a separate "norlin" forum says it all...


...that said, i do take a little snickering pride in at least owning one instrument that was made at the same factory that produced the classic LP's...
So basically, everything Gibson that is made in other factories than Kalamazoo is a copy of a copy :laugh2:
 


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