Make the case for owning a reissue

CB91710

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Buy it because you want to play it, not because you think it will appreciate.

:cheers2:
This.
NEVER view a guitar or a vehicle as an investment... unless you are buying used, have provenance, and are getting an absolute steal of a deal.
Barn-finds can be good investments.
Estate sales can sometimes be decent, but usually, someone in the family has an overblown idea of what something is worth and they tend to be overpriced unless the only person involved is a widow.
Craigslist, eBay, Offerup, hanging on the wall in the music store? You'll rarely recover what you paid.
 

joedonner2001

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Life is short. If you can comfortably afford one - why not?

Personally, I owned a number of historics but eventually ended up back with my favourite Gibson USA Les Paul. I bonded with that particular guitar in such a way that nothing else seemed able to compete, no matter how much money I spent. But the whole process was a great ride and I don't regret any of it one bit.

Come to think about it - I should probably buy a lemonburst R9 just to be sure...:squint:
 

prs97

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My R9 is my numero uno. It was the minute I played it and I have other Les Pauls that are great on their own.

Comfy like a favorite pair of shoes and tone for days.
 

Guitar Rod

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I've had my R9 for 3 years and it still feels special to pick up.
 

Alexb1090

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I tried a 58 reissue and it made my modern standard feel like a plastic toy. Sold it
 

Brian1716

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Hi there!

I saw on Reverb a shop recently had a flash sale, including a Gibson 60th anniversary 1959 Les Paul Standard.

I'd like to have you all make the case for purchasing and owning a reissue. Obviously they're beautiful and painstaking remakes of the legendary Les Pauls, but what should be known beyond that?

If kept in mint condition, will its value appreciate?

Thanks!
Definitely do not purchase anything that’s not truly vintage for resale value (You might make money on it, might not. Probably not).

As for owning one I think it’s a personal thing if spending the money is worth it to you.

A custom shop LP will be (most Cases) lighter than anything on the standard line. My R8 weighs 8 lb 3 oz which is an important factor to me and a huge plus.

I’ve also noticed that custom shops have a much better resonance to them. I’ve always heard you should play guitars unplugged before plugging them in. It’s taken years and playing a lot of different guitars. But when I got my R8 I immediately understood why / what to look for. I own a LP studio for comparison (it’s also a great guitar). But the CS just has something extra in both feel and sound.

I’d play a bunch before buying (if possible) if you aren’t exactly sure what you are looking for.. For instance 59, and 60’s will have slimmer necks than a 58.. Although I’ve played a 59 reissue and didn’t notice too much difference from my R8. Personally I love a chunky neck, but I also own guitars with slimmer necks so I’ve got variety.

If you do buy one and decide it’s not for you I think you’d get most of your money back so I don’t think it’s a huge risk there.. assuming you don’t over pay for one.

Sound and playability aside they just look great like you mentioned. I think having a vintage look / spec definitely plays a factor. I love the aged pick up covers and tuners. I’m not huge on heavy relic or anything but mine has just the right amount of broken in look for me.

If your asking you want one. I say get one and see if it’s for you. Otherwise you’ll just keep wondering.
 

SoK66

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Realistically, a reissue is the the only way most people will ever experience the vibe of an original Les Paul. They long ago left the world of musical instrument and entered the collectibles insane asylum. Like the originals, some are dogs, some are golden. Best to play before buying. When we are released from COVID-19 lockdown, plan a trip to an urban center that has some retailers that specialize in premium guitars. Play a few of the reissues and you'll find one that goes "take me home!"
 

Burty459

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For me, I always fancied a high end les paul, started with a 1999 studio, which I still have and is an absolute monster, no idea what the pickups are but they growl something rotten. Then I got a 2004 tobacco burst classic, again, an awesome guitar. But, I always had the knowledge of custom shop guitars, so I got a used 2008 R8 and it was just immense. It was just different, I traded this up to a 2008 R9, essentially the same guitar, slightly slimmer neck with a more figured top, but it’s awesome. I just got myself a 2017 R8 (standard). Awesome sounding guitar but has a small issue I’m trying to ignore. Anyway, I digress, in a time of need I was planning to sacrifice the R9, so I jumped on a deal for a 2003 USA trans amber standard. Great guitar, looked the part, sounded like a les paul should, but, there was just a noticeable difference. The standard had a steeper neck angle, the quality of the fretboard was a little lacking, the binding on the neck was far fatter and didn’t look as refined, the neck felt different even though it was a 50’s profile, there was just an accumulation of several small things that made me sell the standard on, and last but not least, when I open that brown case I just think “I love this guitar”. It plays on another level and one day it will be cool for my kids to play as well. The first guitars other than my studio that I see in my long term life plan!
 

SoK66

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If you go VOS and aniline dye is used on the back and neck, it most likely will bleed onto the binding. Some people love it, and some scream bloody murder and say it’s a QC issue. But, it is truly VOS!
That bleed into the binding is absolutely authentic and cool as hell if you've experienced cherry stain from the original guitars. When I scored my '06 VOS I chuckled when i saw that effect. 14 years on the finish hasn't done what an original would have done, it still looks very new. A real one would have dulled and perhaps begin to check in spots.
 

4symbols

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Its taken me over Ten Years to finally buy a Gibson Custom Shop, a 2015 1959 Reissue (Sunrise Teaburst). That was 12 months ago which time I have not brought another guitar as nothing else comes close to my 59. OK I,ve had a 2nd but mint Marshall valve amp DSL15C but Les Paul wise I,m spent. Unless I see another Custom Shop takes my fancy. It's a expensive job this guitar collecting malarkey...
 

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MissingSomethin

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Guitars are dying out. You will not get money back. They is an oversupply. You will not have the next 1959 Strat. There are millions of guitars made each day.
 

demaje

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When Gibson produced their 50th Anniversary R9, they made a number of changes to make the reissues "beautiful and painstaking remakes of the legendary Les Pauls". Apparently they felt they didn't change enough, since the 60th Anniversary reissues include some additional mods. Ten years ago, you could buy the Gold Certificate 50th Anniversary R9 for $4800 or so; Gibson's website lists it at over $8000 (but of course we all know that's BS). I've seen them listed on eBay for $4500-$5200 (avg. range) for a few years now.

I don't know how much they want for the 60th Anniversary R9, but I have an extra Gold Certificate 50th Anniversary R9 (barely played, next-to-mint) in my collection that I'm planning to list for $4800. So as an investment, I'd say they're not so great.
 

60'svibe

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Hi there!

I saw on Reverb a shop recently had a flash sale, including a Gibson 60th anniversary 1959 Les Paul Standard.

I'd like to have you all make the case for purchasing and owning a reissue. Obviously they're beautiful and painstaking remakes of the legendary Les Pauls, but what should be known beyond that?

If kept in mint condition, will its value appreciate?

Thanks!
To be completely honest with you I feel that if a company (in this case Gibson) makes two dozen versions of a singular model (in this case a LP) they are cheapening the integral quality of the model. Either a Les Paul is a Les Paul or it isn't. I can see making LP Jrs and Les Paul Specials and even the LP Custom. But a carved top LP Standard should only come in humbucker or P90 formats. That is fine. But when you get 30 or more LP Standards (other than in varying colors) something is wrong. If THE LP Standard is a "standard" why is there so many of them?
 


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