LP Case Storage

omega

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I am so getting one of these for my music room in the basement. Thanks for posting this
Let me tell you, it is a beautiful piece. They come in 3 finishes, I have it in mahogany sides, just really nice. Pretty easy to put together and just a quality product. It keeps the cases organized and off the floor so perfect for a basement.

Buy with confidence, I'm sure you will like it.
 

blues deville

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Everybody goes back into their cases each time. Avoiding any potential damage, dust or other. Maybe it doesn’t show off your collection but my now 53 year old LP Deluxe is still 100%. Just old.
 

est54

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So I’m curious. Are guitar vaults an option for long term storage or are there issues that can come about from that as well?
 

PageSide84

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I keep mine on Hercules stands. I play them much more if I can see them. It gets me motivated to look across the room and see how rock 'n roll my LPs look. I'd likely play less often if they were in cases.
 

rgoebel

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A case is never better for storage than its fit.

No matter how good it looks, a "well made" quality hard case is no good for storage if the guitar gets squeezed. If the neck gets bent over the neck pocket support, you'll get a hump in the neck, that becomes a moving target for continuous neck adjustments aka rubber neck syndrome.

These days it appears like people spend more time trading and shipping guitars than actually playing them and then the main concern is to protect gear from shipping damage (e.g broken head stock). For this purpose tighter is better, which is not necessarily true for storage.

Not only the neck could get squeezed, but also the bridge (especially if you put a towel under the guitar to compensate neck angle) and the PU-selector tip could break (the reason some models used to get shipped with the switch tip in the neck pocket).

Adjusting a case is a bit tricky, especially when the neck support is fixed and non-adjustable. The reason the fit may not be perfect is neck angle variation plus the fact that cases are handmade with tolerances.

Having guitars hanging on the wall or in a stand means they are exposed to dust, UV-light and swings in temperature and humidity. You (and anyone visiting your home) can easily spot and grab your desirable objects.

I have no clue what method manufacturers use to ensure that a guitar is paired with a case that actually fits...at the end of the day the owner has to figure out what's going on inside that case once the latches are closed tight.
Where did you get this info from. All hog wash and jibberish you are speaking! Never heard of a guitar getting squeezed and having damage done from any case! PU selector tip could break? What are you taking for your condition?
 

Scott Gordon

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Adam,

I am a "multi-guitar owner". In fact, in the beginning of my serious relationship with guitars, I was a 14 year old "hanger on" at Les Paul's home and studio in Mahwah, NJ, where I grew up.

The way he stored his guitars, and the way he taught me to do the same, was in the cases. He had entire rooms full of guitars and I keep mine in a storage unit that is temperature controlled. I take them out when I am going to play them. In the unit, I keep them all in the cases and in racks.

Here is a picture of some of them when I went on a polishing spree last year. In fact, I'm due for another one soon.
Guitars in cases.JPG
 

PRS513

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Hey, I've been keeping my LP on a guitar stand instead of the case. I've kept it like this for my entire 2 years of ownership.

I've never had a problem until I went to play it the other day. I hadn't used it for a couple weeks and the neck is now twisted, w a concave bow.

There's been a heatwave here the past couple weeks, which is clearly the culprit, but my question is this...

Is it still better to keep the guitar in the case during the summer, or will the case make the conditions even hotter, and hence worse, for the guitar? I have no other options for storage.

Thanks.
Mine are all on wall hangars in a room that is temperature controlled. I also run a humidifier in the room during the drier winter months. The case only benefits you if you humidify inside the case.
 

edro

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I have a triple hanger stand and two single hanger stands I rotate my 'playing' guitars through. The rest stay in their cases and stand on end.

In a case, there can be no 'rapid' change in humidity or temp inside the case... My house is set on Auto so the temp is maintained year round... I have had zero issues with necks and such, even with guitars I've had for several decades.... My old Lester Custom, haven't felt the need to adjust the neck in pushing 50 years...
 

rogue3

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unless you have an environment that is controlled...in the case, just in case. Not all cuts of wood are susceptible, but how do you know yours is...or isn't? In the case. JP. approved, lol.

mine are out, but the environment is very stable year round...with the exception of winter where humidification is req'd. Not because of what i've read, but because they have behaved nicely being out. one on one proof.
 

GuitarsAnn

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We have April Air and our Air Conditioning will dehumidify during the humid days in Wisconsin summers. Generally, we are about 42 to 50 % humidity in the house. In addition, I keep my guitars in my Access in Sight case when not in use. This keeps my guitars at around 48-50% year around. They stay clean and ready to play and rarely need to be tuned.

J6Qxc5G.jpg
 

DBDM

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A case will help blunt sudden temp changes but will do NOTHING for humidity changes (unless you have an in case humidification device). Humidity in your case will closely approximate humidity in the room. Occasionally with big humidity changes the case can actually be harmful as the case "fur" can hold moisture. Twists have little to do with temp changes and everything to do with the humidity changes. If your neck is twisted, you will need a luthier but if you just need a truss rod adjustment--that is totally normal. Vastly most guitars will need one at least occasionally.

My former neighbor and best friend is George Gruhn. He owns and has owned some of the most expensive guitars in history. He has a pretty large (and curiously growing) collection of his personal guitars. I have never known him to keep any guitar in a case--not his personal ones, not the ones in the museum he curates, not guitars consigned to his store, and certainly not the ones he has for sale. Exception of course is when he is transporting one--in which case he generally uses a Reunion Blues Travel soft case. He hangs them ALL on String Swing and Hercules (the ones he is selling) Hangers. I hang nearly all of mine on String Swing hangers in my home and in my office (theory being "good enough for George Gruhn is good enough for me).

Edit--PS--I also enjoy hanging mine on the wall because I think they are pretty and make nice decorations. I consider guitars "art that I can play". Thats just me (and my son does it too). They are beautiful works of handmade art that can be appreciated visually as well as played. Part of what I love about Gibsons and Martins.
 
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2Muchgear

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Everything I have, except the Martin, is hanging or on a stand. Been this way for 30+ years, no issues. YMMV
 

John_P

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Chill bro, no need to panic.

If you play a guitar that's in need of constant re-adjustments, check the case.

There are even more things that could happen to a guitar while stored in its case...but i figure you don't want to know :) Play the guitar every day and you'll be fine.
 

Buffalo

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Two words, air conditioning.
I gifted my nephew a Strat for Christmas a few years a go. It was in perfect condition when i handed it over. He never played it and had it in a guitar stand directly in front of a AC vent. It developed massive fret sprout you could grind cheese with the neck.
 

Sct13

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On the wall … rotate with a stand … never a problem… acoustics stay in cases because they are delicate …
 

theresstrange

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Hello all... I've been following this thread for a while and thought I'd inject my opinion here on the matter. I subscribe to the "store it in it's case" school. Here's my reasoning and experience:
1) It is easier to control the temperature/Humidity inside your case for sensitive instruments.
2) It prevents accidents.
3) All guitar stands and hangers are suspect when it comes to the materials that come into contact with the finish of your instrument. Nitrocellulose finishes are really susceptible to damage easier than poly finishes and are less durable. The finishes can and will react when left in contact with this material over time/temperature. Manufacturers will claim that it doesn't. I beg to differ. (experience)
4) The likelihood of a reaction to the finish is lessened while stored in it's case.
5) The finish (reds especially) will fade when out and exposed to natural light. All finishes will react differently to this exposure.
6) On various finishes, finish checking is kept to a reasonable minimum over time. (Due to controlling temperature and humidity. Shrinkage is unavoidable over time on nitrocellulose due to the nature of its' properties)
7) While we are on the subject of finish interaction, remove your guitar straps when not being used. Don't store the straps in contact with the instrument in its' case.
8) If you're worried about environmental monitoring, use a digital hygrometer/thermometer monitor. It's really hard to control both in a room during different seasons. A humidifier/de-humidifier and heating and AC really has a yo-yo effect at times. Especially during changes in radical changes of seasons. (Texas for example)
9) If you want to exhibit your collection, then exhibit them and don't worry about it. It becomes art.
10) Stability. (I have instruments that haven't been adjusted in over 10-15 years due to stability factors) Sometimes it take a while for them to stabilize but once they are there, they shouldn't require much adjusting. I keep all instruments at tension even during transport.
11) Keep the instrument standing upright if possible. If not, then in the carry position. This alleviates problems with pressure and "squeeze". Don't stack the cases on top of one another. The instruments won't have exterior pressure exerted on them if the cases are weak or not sturdy.

I hope this helps with some questions or direction. Most professional colleagues of mine also follow this process.

Cheers.
 

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80tiger

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A case is never better for storage than its fit.

No matter how good it looks, a "well made" quality hard case is no good for storage if the guitar gets squeezed. If the neck gets bent over the neck pocket support, you'll get a hump in the neck, that becomes a moving target for continuous neck adjustments aka rubber neck syndrome.

These days it appears like people spend more time trading and shipping guitars than actually playing them and then the main concern is to protect gear from shipping damage (e.g broken head stock). For this purpose tighter is better, which is not necessarily true for storage.

Not only the neck could get squeezed, but also the bridge (especially if you put a towel under the guitar to compensate neck angle) and the PU-selector tip could break (the reason some models used to get shipped with the switch tip in the neck pocket).

Adjusting a case is a bit tricky, especially when the neck support is fixed and non-adjustable. The reason the fit may not be perfect is neck angle variation plus the fact that cases are handmade with tolerances.

Having guitars hanging on the wall or in a stand means they are exposed to dust, UV-light and swings in temperature and humidity. You (and anyone visiting your home) can easily spot and grab your desirable objects.

I have no clue what method manufacturers use to ensure that a guitar is paired with a case that actually fits...at the end of the day the owner has to figure out what's going on inside that case once the latches are closed tight.
True. I bought recently a vintage Tele Jr that was always stored in the case but due to the unusual heel on the guitar, the body was raised up. Put downward pressure on the neck and body over the neck support and warped the neck to having a significant back bow. Had to send it back. Shame. Was an almost untouched Tele Jr but the case messed it up.
 

Les Paul Advocate

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When it comes to what I've been told about weather and what is likely to cause issues with guitars......the words that speak loudest to me are avoid exposing your guitars to "sudden" temperature changes.

For this reason I am comfortable having my 20+ guitars hanging in the garage being subjected to "natural" temperature changes. I suspect air conditioning/heating has more potential to create sudden temperature changes than an environment with no temperature controls.

I've never noticed any issues other than needing to tune a guitar when I want to play one that hasn't been played in a bit. I always check the tuning of my guitar first thing anyways.

It seems from the various responses there are a lot more theories of what "could" cause damage and what "might" prevent damage than any actual damage to anyone's guitars.

I am fortunate I don't live in humid part of the country so my opinion only applies to temperature changes....not humidity related issues.
 

theresstrange

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When it comes to what I've been told about weather and what is likely to cause issues with guitars......the words that speak loudest to me are avoid exposing your guitars to "sudden" temperature changes.

For this reason I am comfortable having my 20+ guitars hanging in the garage being subjected to "natural" temperature changes. I suspect air conditioning/heating has more potential to create sudden temperature changes than an environment with no temperature controls.

I've never noticed any issues other than needing to tune a guitar when I want to play one that hasn't been played in a bit. I always check the tuning of my guitar first thing anyways.

It seems from the various responses there are a lot more theories of what "could" cause damage and what "might" prevent damage than any actual damage to anyone's guitars.

I am fortunate I don't live in humid part of the country so my opinion only applies to temperature changes....not humidity related issues.
The biggest culprit in damaging an instrument is humidity. High temperature is next. It's better to have high humidity vs. low humidity. (Swelling vs. cracking) and low temperature vs. high temperature (shrinkage vs. seams opening). But there is never one over the other. Both are equally bad and detrimental. Don't forget... these conditions have to occur over time. It's not an instant problem. The instrument has to be subjected to the condition for a period of hours or days, depending.
 

dbruno

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In the case it goes when done playing. Never on a hanger or stand. Especially during set breaks.
 

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