Lowest profile right angle pedal connectors for making cables.

eddie_bowers

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2007
Messages
851
Reaction score
163
OK. Those low profile pancake style connectors are great when they come premade. Even the cheap Hosa ones are fine.
You can buy the ends so you can make custom lengths, BUT the few I have tried haven't worked very well. When you heat up the pin enough to melt the solder it softens the plastic holding the shaft in place. After that it wiggles around and is no longer something I trust. Aside from jokes about wiggly shafts, is there a better product that doesn't have this problem, but still is just as low profile? I have tried different irons so the heat isn't on it very long, but it's always the same issue.

-Eddie
 

northernguitarguy

SWeAT hOg
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
36,446
Reaction score
64,801
I'm glad you posted this. I've toyed with the idea about getting some of these to free up a modicum of pedalboard real estate. I know I should just bite the bullet and buy some George L's or whatever, but the price would be massive for my board.
 

E1WOOD5150

Purveyor of Joke Grenades
Joined
Jan 15, 2014
Messages
3,749
Reaction score
6,054
I bought a number of the Hosa pancake style patch cables in 6" lengths, and a few 12" as well. I think I saw 9" cables available, too, but might be thinking of another patch cord I bought at the same time. Check Amazon.
 

eddie_bowers

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2007
Messages
851
Reaction score
163
Excellent! Thanks guys. Definitely going to check out the Sinasoid Slivers.
I had a bag of unmarked 3 inch pancake style cables and decided to take a few apart today. I was actually able to solder to those without issues, so I guess if I can ever find that same part I would be OK. They had some sort of fiber insulator instead of plastic.
 

cooljuk

Transducer Producer
Joined
Mar 11, 2009
Messages
16,539
Reaction score
23,873
You can buy the ends so you can make custom lengths, BUT the few I have tried haven't worked very well. When you heat up the pin enough to melt the solder it softens the plastic holding the shaft in place.
It sounds like you are buying generic non-Switchcraft plugs.

The Switchcraft 228 right-angle TS plugs have no plastic parts inside. These are the ones you want. Their only downside is that they are heavier than molded plastic ones so when you have 100 on a pedal board you're adding a couple pounds of weight (still probably nothing compared to the pedals, themselves).

Here's some internal photos of the Switchcraft 228 plugs:





If you're using Mogami or Canare wire, make sure you remove the black conductive plastic coating around the inner clear insulation of the wire's center conductor. That will partially short your cables, otherwise, and they will sound dark and quiet. Removed on the right (correct), still intact on the left (incorrect).


If you need help, just reach out. I can walk you through making these. I do WAY too many of them. Switchcraft 228s are the best quality right/angle TS plugs I'm aware of. The ones I made above have been on tour for 3+ years with no trouble. You shouldn't have any problem with 228s, when done right.
 

rjshare

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
Messages
4,935
Reaction score
5,043
I use these which look pretty similar, and have not had any issues either with soldering or in use:

 

cooljuk

Transducer Producer
Joined
Mar 11, 2009
Messages
16,539
Reaction score
23,873
I don't personally like working with the thin little solder tabs in the Hicons and but rjshare is right, those should work, as well.

Here's an internal photo of the Hicons for comparison to the Switchcraft 228s above:
 

northernguitarguy

SWeAT hOg
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
36,446
Reaction score
64,801
Hey cooljuk, do those Switchcraft plugs have a lug for the shield? I can't tell from the pic.
 

cooljuk

Transducer Producer
Joined
Mar 11, 2009
Messages
16,539
Reaction score
23,873
Hey cooljuk, do those Switchcraft plugs have a lug for the shield? I can't tell from the pic.
No lugs. The shield just solders directly to the inside of the casing, itself. It's handy that one can solder on either side this way, depending on the natural curl of the cable and which way you want the plug to face. No trying to "thread" a shield into a lug or worry about a lug breaking, either.

This one may show it better:


The center conductor doesn't really have a lug either. It has a little hole/cup you insert the center conductor into and then fill with solder. ...or the other way around. The TRS (stereo/3 conductor) version does have a lug for the ring connector.
 

spitfire

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2009
Messages
1,952
Reaction score
2,287
When you heat up the pin enough to melt the solder it softens the plastic holding the shaft in place.
-Eddie
As a general rule when soldering, if you have to hold the soldering iron on so long that you are damaging other areas, it's an indication that your iron needs MORE power.

The trick to not overheating other areas is to have enough power to heat the spot you're soldering quickly while leaving the areas around it cold.

When using low power irons <75 W, a large part will draw the heat out and there is not enough power to heat the one spot. So you have to hold the iron on until you heat everything up.

The best thing to have is a high power iron with temperature control. That way it never gets too hot, but when you need the power it's there.

I use the 6" pre-made pancake cords (Hosa?). They are the lowest profile I've found.
 

cooljuk

Transducer Producer
Joined
Mar 11, 2009
Messages
16,539
Reaction score
23,873
Spitfire for the win! Totally agree. I'll add only that even a high-powered iron, with an old and / or dirty tip, will preform like a low wattage iron. A new and clean (both!) tip is essential to proper soldering.
 

northernguitarguy

SWeAT hOg
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
36,446
Reaction score
64,801
No lugs. The shield just solders directly to the inside of the casing, itself. It's handy that one can solder on either side this way, depending on the natural curl of the cable and which way you want the plug to face. No trying to "thread" a shield into a lug or worry about a lug breaking, either.

This one may show it better:


The center conductor doesn't really have a lug either. It has a little hole/cup you insert the center conductor into and then fill with solder. ...or the other way around. The TRS (stereo/3 conductor) version does have a lug for the ring connector.
Thanks, James!:)
 

Jackstand Johnny

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Messages
17
Reaction score
1
I use GLs right angle pancake connectors. Theyre 20 for $30. Absolutely the best bang for your buck. I just built 20 patch cables with them and have had zero prpblems in 3 months. Unlike the cheap eNay connectors, these also have 2 lugs rather than having to try to solder to chrome plating for the ground. Those Hosa pancakes look great, but I dont think you can beat GLS on the price. The weord thing is they sell something rodiculous like 5 for $15 but you can get 20 for $30. I highly recommend them if you want to save ,oney building your own cables.
 

kboman

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Messages
6,487
Reaction score
5,743
There is a massive difference between the Switchcraft 228s and the knock-offs. I have experience with both: the cheap ones tended to just fall apart (at least one before I had even attached any cable) and they actually kill treble in a way that is quite noticable. Choose wisely!
 

Jackstand Johnny

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2017
Messages
17
Reaction score
1
I would not call GLS connectors "knockoffs" if thats what youre saying. All of my cables using GLS connectors are the quietest cables Ive ever owner and Ive noticed absolutely no difference with tone or loss that wouldnt be a bigger issue from any digital or buffered bypass pedals.
 

Grenville

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
358
Reaction score
234
Hey cooljuk, do those Switchcraft plugs have a lug for the shield? I can't tell from the pic.
Switchcraft's recent model 229 plug has lugs.

Yes, they are pricier and sturdier than the GLS ones. I used GLS for a long time but use Switchcraft 229's now.
 


Latest Threads



Top