Loose Toggle Switch

HearHear

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My brand new Les Paul Standard 50’s is a great guitar, except for two things- it came new with a loose toggle switch, and what looks like lacquer overspray or something on top of the headstock in the open book groove. I aligned and tightened the toggle switch by hand, the switch seems to work fine. But this overspray, finish defect, or whatever this is bothers me. It isn’t something I can readily fix, unless it goes away with polish and a cloth, which I suspect it won’t. Would you send this back? I hate to because I love the guitar, but it should be right. If this can’t be fixed I might send it back for exchange- any thoughts on how to fix it?

C1BCA6BA-78EC-4952-BC18-14EB87AE1E68.jpeg
 

Roxy13

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How much are you going to stare into the open book?

Right now, a lot because you found it and it bothers you. But, down the road you won't care if you are otherwise happy with it.
 

SNick

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If it plays really good just keep it. Tell everyone who remarks about the over spray that it came from the Gibson Custom Shop that way. You asked for an identifying mark to tell yours from all others. How big a pain in the rear is it to send it back?
 

slug_maine

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It's your call on sending it back. That wouldn't bother me a bit if I liked the guitar otherwise.
 

BadPenguin

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The overspray wouldn't bother me in the least. The dust and crap all over it.... that would.
 

HearHear

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Yea I’m leaning towards keeping it. The body is flawless, and pretty in Ebony. After adjusting and tightening the loose toggle switch, I took the back plate off to see what the wiring was like. I wanted to make sure I didn’t twist any wires around while adjusting the switch position. Here’s what the back of a toggle switch looks like inside the body, for those newbies like me who are curious. Someone at the factory wrote “5” on the back of my toggle switch:

91244E30-B977-466B-9DCE-1841F207CC48.jpeg


Another angle

CEA403B8-2EAE-43A2-B841-32299C365186.jpeg
 

scooter500

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So I'd say, if this to be more of a daily player's guitar then ignore it, but if it's to be more of a collector's guitar then back it goes.

I have a Gibson that was made in their Custom USA shop 10, 12 years ago and it came with a couple of minor blems. By now wear from playing and oxidation has surpassed the original blems. Still, it's like my daily driver GMC. Wash n wax it and it still looks good enough to get complements.

elp Still You Turn Me On
 

Wrench66

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No I wouldn’t send it back for those issues alone.
 

Gibsonrocknroll

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If the guitar plays well and that's all the issues you can find I would contact the dealer and ask for a some money back. If not return it.
 

01GT Eibach

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It is interesting that you called this thread "Loose Toggle Switch" and not "Lacquer Over Spray". The toggle-switch thing is a non-event, fixable in 10 seconds by even a GC guitar tech. The over-spray thing is a legit issue.
 

ARandall

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The whole of the guitar is sprayed with clear, and the whole of the headstock is black. There cannot be overspray by definition in any step of finishing in this scenario.
Buffers just don't reach into that area, so what you have there is simply an area that cannot be made mirror shine like the rest of the guitar. And opaque colours always show up this more than guitars with translucent colour.
And then 10 years down the track when the nitro has finally sunk fully into the pores you'll have little imperfections everywhere. Maybe you'd do better with a poly finished guitar with shapes that the buffer can get into.
 

AJK1

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I think there are a few Fender employees on this forum…
 

moreles

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IMO that's a bit of mediocre work but not worth returning. It looks to me like there's inadequate finish buildup, and maybe some crappy sanding, in the crevice of the open book. That's a hard-to-reach area and the kind of thing that separates real craftsmanship and excellence from just good factory work. This is just decent factory work. I suspect that everyone is trying to spray thinner finishes and that a while past, this might have received a heavier lacquer buildup and been smoother. It's really just what Gibsons are like -- it's hard to find one that's genuinely immaculate. I'd rather have less finish than too much.
 

Findthetone

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Considering that's one of the first places for a Les Paul to get a ding, I wouldn't give it another thought if it's going to be a player.
 

integra evan

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The whole of the guitar is sprayed with clear, and the whole of the headstock is black. There cannot be overspray by definition in any step of finishing in this scenario.
Buffers just don't reach into that area, so what you have there is simply an area that cannot be made mirror shine like the rest of the guitar. And opaque colours always show up this more than guitars with translucent colour.
And then 10 years down the track when the nitro has finally sunk fully into the pores you'll have little imperfections everywhere. Maybe you'd do better with a poly finished guitar with shapes that the buffer can get into.
^This
 

nadzab

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Considering that's one of the first places for a Les Paul to get a ding, I wouldn't give it another thought if it's going to be a player.

No doubt.


IMG_3821.JPG



Honestly I don't even see an issue with the OP's guitar...I mean, kinda, maybe, but probably nothing that can't be corrected with some very fine rubbing compound and a microfiber towel if it's really bothering.
 

MGSatch

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My Les Paul has this little overspray imperfection from factory and I'm not bothered by it. I love it actually. All the imperfections on it are now mine and I'll cherish them all.
 

HearHear

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I have to give a little update on this thread. This may be unsuitable for those new to the brand, expecting perfection, so fair warning. Read on at your discretion.
This is actually the second new exchange guitar I received back from Gibson. The original guitar I posted on here in another thread (just like the one pictured here) was sent back for a different reason. I'll explain.
So I received a brand new Gibson Les Paul 50's Standard in Ebony, part of the Exclusives collection on their website. About $2,600. I excitedly opened it up after I let it sit in the box for a day, and took it to my guitar lesson so I could plug and play for the first time with it.
No sound came out of the jack. I plugged it in several different amps, but no sound. Brand new $2,600 guitar, I'm at my lesson, and it doesn't work. It's dead.
So, I bring it home hoping it was just an issue at the music school, and plug it into my amp. Still nothing, guitar is dead. I'm not a luthier or very technical, so I decide to send it back for exchange.
I call Gibson, explain the problem, and the rep starts trying to find a repair shop near me to take it to. I said no thanks, I'm not wasting time getting this thing taken apart and fixed locally. It's a brand new guitar and it should work. I want to exchange it for a new guitar. He agreed, gave me the return label, and off it went to Gibson.
About a week or so later, pretty fast, I received my new exchange guitar (this one pictured here in this thread.)
I ended up sending this one back to Gibson for exchange as well. I just couldn't live with the switch and headstock imperfections on a $2,600 brand new guitar. So I called Gibson customer service, explained what was wrong, and the rep said ok, we'll exchange it. He sent the return label and off it went back to Gibson.
Several days go by, I hear nothing. We're traveling this weekend so yesterday I asked Gibson if they could wait to ship my new guitar until Tuesday next week. The rep said sure, no problem, he'll tell the warehouse.
So late yesterday I get a message from UPS that it shipped out. Just what I didn't want. I guess the phone rep and the warehouse didn't see eye to eye. It should arrive tomorrow, though, so if it does that would actually be OK since we don't leave until Saturday morning. If it gets delayed at all, even by a day or so, I won't be home to sign for it and it will bounce along on the UPS truck or get put in a warehouse until I get back.
We'll see if third time's the charm and this new guitar works and looks good. If it comes dead or with significant imperfections, I give up and will request a refund. Fingers crossed.
 

Injector

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The last three Gibsons I've bought, all Custom Shop, have all had loose and rattley pickup selector switches when in the middle position. My old USA LPs never had this problem even after years of use. It just feels cheap.
 

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