London 2012 Olympics: Dow Chemical sponsorship protests 'beyond belief' says CEO

teame1

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So today BP has announced compensation payments of 8 billion to fishermen for the Gulf leak. BP was leasing the rig from Transocean with other possible companies at fault being cement contractor Halliburton and Cameron International, maker of the well's failed blowout preventer.
It was a bad accident and 2 wrongs don't make a right, but yet again the ongoing hypocrisy of how the US values things is highlighted by

Andrew Liveris, chief executive of Dow Chemical, says the ongoing protests over his company's sponsorship of the London 2012 Olympics are "beyond belief".

Beyond belief: Andrew Liveris, chief executive of Dow Chemical, said protests over Olympic sponsorship were unwarranted
Liveris was reacting to the news that Indian officials and politicians have stepped up the pressure to boycott the opening and closing ceremonies - and other Games events - because of the company's links with the Bhopal gas leak, 28 years ago.
He claims Dow, the American multi-national chemical corporation who have funded the stadium wrap, are being targeted because they have "deep pockets".
Indian Olympic Association executive board members will meet on Friday to decide on formal protest action - such as refusing to participate in the ceremonies or formal functions - after the International Olympic Committee rejected their initial appeal to remove Dow as a sponsor of the Games.
However, the IOA's acting president, VJ Malhotra, has insisted that protest action will not involve a total Indian boycott of the Games, as that would punish their 70-strong team of athletes.
But the issue of Dow being involved in the Games has intensified in the Bhopal region - the scene of the Union Carbide gas leak in 1984 which officially killed 3,787 people - after Wikileaks produced emails showing the company had hired the private intelligence company Stratfor to monitor Bhopal protest groups.
Liveris told Bloomberg that Dow Chemical wasn't involved in the Bhopal disaster but his public comments indicate that the company has had to rachet up its public relations campaign as the controversy continues to rumble on without any apparent resolution.
"It was not us," said Liveris. "The fact that you can speak back with science and fact rather than emotion and hysteria is your only defense."
The IOC - which receives £60million a year from Dow - as well as the London Organising Committee, which also receives sponsorship benefits from the company, have publicly backed Dow's stance.
The company maintains it has no further liabilities as it bought Union Carbide 16 years after the disaster and a compensation deal, subsequently upheld by two court cases, had already been settled.
Liveris continuted: "To keep coming back to the notion that you acquire a company where there is a bright line on the liability that was settled way beyond your time, and to hook you in to that event, it's beyond belief that people are still trying that.
"The obvious reason people are trying that is because we are a healthy company with deep pockets that people want a second bite of the cherry on.
"I keep saying, 'Please go to India, please talk to the government of India and please work it out with them.'"
But the protesters, including those who have been the subject of scrutiny of Stratfor, believe Dow has ongoing moral, ethical and legal liabilities relating to the Bhopal disaster through its subsequent ownership of Union Carbide.
The Indian Sports Ministry has backed the initial stance taken by its Olympic athletes wanting to stage some protest action and, according to reports in the Indian press on Wednesday, sent a letter to the IOC, signed by joint secretary Rahul Bhatnager.
The letter said: "We strongly believe that there is no better medium than sports to inculcate and foster the feeling of friendship and solidarity among the people of the world.
"This being so we are dismayed that the IOC has not respected the sentiments of a large group of stakeholders including Olympians and withdrawn its association with Dow Chemical."
Last week a call for UK parliamentary scrutiny of Dow Chemical's sponsorship of the Olympic Stadium wrap was passed to Locog with Tourism Minister John Penrose saying the Government had little influence over the matter.
The sports minister Hugh Robertson said outside of parliament: "The time for a protest, if any protest needed to be had, was the moment that the IOC signed up Dow in the first place."
 

Rankelson

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I remember Bhopal and Chernobyl
like it was yesterday
We must punish corporations if they pollute
our environment,
Regardless of where the company is from
 

SteveGangi

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If there are major damages and severe disruption or even destruction of countless peoples livelihoods, the responsible company SHOULD make restitution. If the company later is bought or acquired by someone else, they knew what the conditions were, and the "offending" company should not view being bought up as an kind of "get out of jail free" card.

You screw up, you pay. That;s how it works for people. Businessmen seem to want companies to have the same rights as people. So, why not let them have the same responsibilities and risks too.
 

KSG_Standard

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If DOW chemical knowingly or willfully caused the disaster at Bhopal that would be one thing...if, however the disaster was instead caused by faulty operation, poor training, bad management, lack of rules/regulation by Indian officials/management...or, if as alleged in some reputable accounts, by intentional sabotage by an Indian worker...then the outrage against DOW is just stupid.

What are the provable allegations and REAL provable facts in the case?
 

geochem1st

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If DOW chemical knowingly or willfully caused the disaster at Bhopal that would be one thing...if, however the disaster was instead caused by faulty operation, poor training, bad management, lack of rules/regulation by Indian officials/management...or, if as alleged in some reputable accounts, by intentional sabotage by an Indian worker...then the outrage against DOW is just stupid.

What are the provable allegations and REAL provable facts in the case?

For these DOW is still on the hook as Dow is directly accountable, no one else.

Never saw a reputable account of sabotage by an Indian in any court testimony.
 

KSG_Standard

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DOW purchased Union Carbide AFTER the disaster. The Bhopal plant was run by, managed by, operated by the Union Carbide India Limited, as per Indian law. Training, hiring, safety programs, regulation, inspection were all the responsibility of Union Carbide India Limited...as per Indian law and agreement.
 

geochem1st

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DOW purchased Union Carbide AFTER the disaster. The Bhopal plant was run by, managed by, operated by the Union Carbide India Limited, as per Indian law. Training, hiring, safety programs, regulation, inspection were all the responsibility of Union Carbide India Limited...as per Indian law and agreement.

I'm sure that alleviates all responsibility in your eyes. But the people know better, what is... right and wrong. Bhopal is far from cleaned up and DOW is doing nothing to remedy this as the new stewards of the plant.
 

KSG_Standard

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Of course, I understand. DOW is a corporation...a multinational corporation...'nuff said.:cool:
 

geochem1st

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Of course, I understand. DOW is a corporation...a multinational corporation...'nuff said.:cool:

If your neighbor poisoned the local water sources, affecting those on your property directly, made a deal with the government for limited liability, then sold the property to me.... You didn't get any relief from the government (it was legal afterall) and you didn't get nearly enough from the previous owner, and the costs are way out of your league to pay out of pocket, as most environmental cleanups are. Wouldn't you expect some type of relief from me for your contaminated water that was never addressed by the government nor the previous owner?

Wouldn't it be the neighborly thing to do on my part, knowing that I was buying contaminated property with foreknowledge that impacted the region?
 

KSG_Standard

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If my neighbor required that he be in complete charge of the entire operation...from hiring to training to safety to engineering and everything else and he f'cked up and killed his family and his other neighbors, I'd think him foolish for trying to pin the blame on me. I'd think him stupid if he tried to pin the blame on the fella that bought my house.

Union Carbide did pay damages and assist in the cleanup. All civil claims were settled over 20 years ago at the direction of and the approval of the Indian Supreme Court.
 

River

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It was a bad accident and 2 wrongs don't make a right, but yet again the ongoing hypocrisy of how the US values things is highlighted by
Stick it in your ear; unlubricated and rotated rapidly.

How you get away with posting inflammatory bullshit at the rate of a Black Angus corralled in a jalapeno patch is beyond me. I guess you've got a Royal Warrant or some shit.

Sleigh-ride in it.
 

bertzie

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DOW purchased Union Carbide AFTER the disaster. The Bhopal plant was run by, managed by, operated by the Union Carbide India Limited, as per Indian law. Training, hiring, safety programs, regulation, inspection were all the responsibility of Union Carbide India Limited...as per Indian law and agreement.

And like any corporation, they did the absolute minimum to comply.
 

geochem1st

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If my neighbor required that he be in complete charge of the entire operation...from hiring to training to safety to engineering and everything else and he f'cked up and killed his family and his other neighbors, I'd think him foolish for trying to pin the blame on me. I'd think him stupid if he tried to pin the blame on the fella that bought my house.

Union Carbide did pay damages and assist in the cleanup. All civil claims were settled over 20 years ago at the direction of and the approval of the Indian Supreme Court.

Good thing here in America, if that site were here and I was to buy that site, I would be on the hook for its cleanup. Good thing here in America regulations are in place to ensure that the right thing would be done (and hopefully enforced).

Good thing we have these regulations to keep us from acting as third world countries. Count your blessings that you and your assets if impacted by a UCC/DOW are protected by these regulations as well.
 

KSG_Standard

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Yes, of course. Regulations are the secret to happiness and safety.
 

bertzie

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Because we all know corporations will always do the right thing and never abuse silly little things like the environment or their employees.
 

geochem1st

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Yes, of course. Regulations are the secret to happiness and safety.



Libertarian-Lifeguards.jpg
 

KSG_Standard

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Gaia willing, all human behavior will be regulated one day...only then will we have the utopia that we deserve.
 

River

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Gaia willing, all human behavior will be regulated one day...only then will we have the utopia that we deserve.
It already is. Enforcement may be a bit lax under very specific circumstances, but it already is and boy howdy.

Pretending it's not isn't going to make things any better for anyone. In fact, that'll just unleash the Hounds of Hell. Try it and see. I'll watch.
 

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