Locking tuners post is very low - would you accept this?

ns2a

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I was going to install a set of Gotoh SG360 locking tuners on my Ibanez RG. When I did, the tuner post is very low. The (online) dealer says it's fine, you only need one string wrap anyway.

Eh. Would you accept this? The difference between the base of the original tuner to the bottom of the string hole is 4.5mm. And the string angle will obviously change.

What do you think?
 

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Subterfuge

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I'm no expert but I think it's too low, if it were my rig I wouldn't do it ...
 

BKS

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That looks weird.... No, no go for me either.
 

Brek

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Are they gotoh tuners? They come in 3 heights on one range they do, if those are from that range they are the lowest height holes at 18mm iirc. They are a touch lower than the klusons on my guitars in your picture, but I wouldn’t think it’s an issue.

With my grovers the hole sits higher than the klusons, on my vintage set and modern set of milk bottles, interestingly the vintage set has a shorter 10mm section, so the holes I drilled for the those are too shallow for the modern ones, although I really don’t want to drill any further through. String tension should be lower if higher and tighter if lower?
 

Brian N

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If you're going for tuning stability, those low posts will have the opposite effect, since they'll add friction to the nut. Although locking tuners don't help with tuning stability anyway.

Having the posts so low will change the feel of the guitar, the strings will feel stiffer. I replaced the locking tuners on my LP with normal non-locking tuners because I wanted a slightly higher break angle to get that looser feel.
 

THDNUT

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Those low height tuners look a little weird but after a while I would get used to them. They should work ok.
 

BadPenguin

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I have a set of GOTOH locker on my Samick PRS copy. Believe it or not, yours are normal height
GEDC1632.JPG
.

If you're going for tuning stability, those low posts will have the opposite effect, since they'll add friction to the nut. Although locking tuners don't help with tuning stability anyway.
Uhhh, no. The purpose of the height of the tuner is to create as straight of a string path as possible over the nut. I personally think locking tuners on a non trem guitar is stupid. And no, I don't buy the "it makes string changes faster" answer as a real answer. I mean really, what does it save, maybe 3-5 minutes on a guitar?
(Sorry about the rant there.)

And no, they won't add any more friction to the nut. How will they?
 

CB91710

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Seems a little low... more like the E and B from a staggered Fender set, but it depends on the brand.
Some manufacturers go lower than others.

These are my Grovers:

5203.jpg

5245.jpg

5717.jpg

5950.jpg
 

CB91710

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Uhhh, no. The purpose of the height of the tuner is to create as straight of a string path as possible over the nut. I personally think locking tuners on a non trem guitar is stupid. And no, I don't buy the "it makes string changes faster" answer as a real answer. I mean really, what does it save, maybe 3-5 minutes on a guitar?
Well, I and many others think your opinion is stupid.

See how it feels when someone calls your personal preference something insulting for no good reason?

It's a personal preference, regardless of the reason.

I happen to like locking tuners, and I don't feel they add anything to tuning stability, even on a tremolo-equipped guitar unless the tremolo is used to extreme drops.
Tuning stability is in the nut and saddles, and the break angle.
 

ARandall

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And no, they won't add any more friction to the nut. How will they?
Simple physics. If you create more of an angle over a fulcrum with the same tension longitudinally then by definition there is more downward force over said fulcrum.....which means more friction for something that has to pass across.
 

Brian N

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I have a set of GOTOH locker on my Samick PRS copy. Believe it or not, yours are normal height View attachment 535057 .



Uhhh, no. The purpose of the height of the tuner is to create as straight of a string path as possible over the nut. I personally think locking tuners on a non trem guitar is stupid. And no, I don't buy the "it makes string changes faster" answer as a real answer. I mean really, what does it save, maybe 3-5 minutes on a guitar?
(Sorry about the rant there.)

And no, they won't add any more friction to the nut. How will they?
Seeing as how you have those tuners on your guitar already, I'd say you're a little biased about this topic. Suffice it to say, the more extreme break angle is what causes higher nut friction, as well as the tighter feeling on the strings. The latter can be easily demonstrated by lowering and raising the tailpiece (on a guitar that has one). The former can be easily demonstrated by anyone in an elementary school science class.
 

OldBenKenobi

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I have the same Gotohs and they sit at the same height.

Doesn't bother me.
 

Dolebludger

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the only reason I like locking tuners is that they keep newly installed strings in tune better after a bend. But that is something.
 

E.X

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If you're going for tuning stability, those low posts will have the opposite effect, since they'll add friction to the nut
My understanding is that the nut is shaped according to string spacing, string gauge(s), height and angle.
As such, changing the post-nut angle would necessitate adjusting the nut as well.
But assuming the nut angle's what it should be for those specific tuners/angle they give, there shouldn't be an issue, definitely no friction.

Am i wrong? :s
As in goes without saying that such a change would go hand in hand with some nut filing?
 

Brian N

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My understanding is that the nut is shaped according to string spacing, string gauge(s), height and angle.
As such, changing the post-nut angle would necessitate adjusting the nut as well.
But assuming the nut angle's what it should be for those specific tuners/angle they give, there shouldn't be an issue, definitely no friction.

Am i wrong? :s
As in goes without saying that such a change would go hand in hand with some nut filing?
A well cut nut definitely needs to have a steeper dropoff than the string to post angle, but there's no reason why it can't be even steeper. To that end, the nut may already be cut steep enough for the lower posts.
 

Freddy G

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Are you sure it's not a staggered post height set? If so, the tallest post should be closest to the nut. If not I'd say that's too low if, and only if you're using it on a tremolo bridge guitar to mitigate friction at the nut. But if it's for a hardtail guitar ....fill your boots! The lower the better.
 

Dolebludger

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I just installed PRS SE locking tuners on my guitar of the same designation. The string hoke is rather low, like it is in the OP, but with fewer winds, the strings cross the nut at the same angle. And those eliminate the problem with going out of tune on new strings due to multiple winds.
 

Freddy G

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I just installed PRS SE locking tuners on my guitar of the same designation. The string hoke is rather low, like it is in the OP, but with fewer winds, the strings cross the nut at the same angle. And those eliminate the problem with going out of tune on new strings due to multiple winds.
You should actually not have ANY winds on a locking tuner for max tuning stability. When you install a string, turn the tuner post so the hole is parallel with the neck, in other words in line with the string. Pull the string straight though the tuner post as taught as you can and lock it. Then when you tune it up you should only see about a half a wrap around the pot,
 

CB91710

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You should actually not have ANY winds on a locking tuner for max tuning stability. When you install a string, turn the tuner post so the hole is parallel with the neck, in other words in line with the string. Pull the string straight though the tuner post as taught as you can and lock it. Then when you tune it up you should only see about a half a wrap around the pot,
If the PRS tuners are anything like the Tronical locks, they're a real clusterfuck and IMHO, not stable.
 


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