Little Lester, for My Little Guy

Stephmon

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Thanks! I'm really pleased how well I was able to capture the flame in my photos. My travel photography hobby and all of the knowledge and gear I've acquired has really paid off.

Now, I have to take a deep breath and accept the inevitable 'relic'ing' that will come with handing it over to my 6 year old.

I'll try to get a video up soon. It sounds killer. I just need to adapt to the 1/2 scale, with my 1.5 scale hands.
 

Stephmon

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Absolutely amazing job! I have to admit I'm a little disappointed at the amp, I was hoping for a mini stack I guess :applause:

Of course, a mini Marshall would compliment the guitar nicely.

For the price, I'm not sure you can beat the Danelectro Honeytone though. It really has some nice clean/overdriven tone, when you roll the volume on the guitar or play light and then dig in.
 

tnt423

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Nice work. Lucky boy you got there. Just curious as to why you haven't leveledd and buffed the finish though, is it because you think he'll be rough on it?
 

jkes01

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That turned out awesome. Bet it's a blast to play. Nicely done :applause: now I want one :D
 

Stephmon

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Nice work. Lucky boy you got there. Just curious as to why you haven't leveledd and buffed the finish though, is it because you think he'll be rough on it?


Thanks!

Throughout this build, I have been experimenting, to capitalize on the learning opportunities.

My vision for the finish is "Closet Classic". I want the guitar to look and feel 40 years old (apart from the chrome, of course, which was specified by the 'client'), without doing any intentional relic'ing. So, I did a single round of pore filling (experimenting with plaster of paris) and shot very thin applications of clear, which I allowed to cure and then simply polished to a shine with rubbing and polishing compounds. In person, the effect isn't perfect, but has some of the 'shrunk into the grain' look of vintage nitro (and now, I know what to expect of this technique). The camera lighting does make it look a bit more orange-peel, than it looks in person. Not a lot more, but to the eye, there isn't enough texture to bother me. For me, the point was that it not look like a 'grand piano' finish and I think I've got that.
 

hardangerfjol

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hope the little guy picks up some of his fathers woodworking skills as he grows older !

congratulations on this great build...

h.
 

Stephmon

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With all that has been going on, I haven't had time to sit down and do a video. In the meantime, here is a family photo of my most recent builds. Really gives a sense of scale that is lost a bit, in the solo shots...
12546267505_78d47009cb.jpg
 

blaumph2cool

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Stehpmon, are you happy with the pickup placement? I am planning a mini paul for my boy and haven't decided where to place the pup. I was thinking more toward the middle for an even tone.
 

Eric Smith

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With all that has been going on, I haven't had time to sit down and do a video. In the meantime, here is a family photo of my most recent builds. Really gives a sense of scale that is lost a bit, in the solo shots...
12546267505_78d47009cb.jpg
Love the Ace star on the headstock.
 

Stephmon

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I have no regrets about the pup placement. First and foremost, the placement reduces what to do about hiding the neck tenon, to a 'problem already solved'.

I have no comparison, but I suspect a bridge position pup might be on the harsh side, considering the octave tuning.

Thanks for the interest in this thread, guys! I'm not quite a year late with a video, but with the cold weather, I think I will have to finally get around to a sound sample.

I got my son a lesson book, which starts with 3-note chords and a CD to play along with. It's a bit of a challenge to keep him focused (especially, when the strings start to irritate his finger tips) but the guitar is working out really well for his size and play-ability.
 

Adinol

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So, I went to the lumber yard, today, but they wanted $50 for the amount of wood I would need for the top. I do spend money on my kid, that's not the issue, but I just thought it was too much and that it also didn't quite fit with the concept of a rugged home built guitar. I also like the idea of building an instrument out of other people's garbage. So, on my way into the store I noticed a dumpster full of scraps. I asked them if I could take any and they were happy to let me have as much as I could eat.

I ended up bringing home were one block of mahogany, some narrow maple boards and a bunch of 3/4x1/4 mahogany strips.

found-lumber.jpg


I looked some more around my shop and found some more scrap maple. I think I can just make a 3-piece top (and back) and use the strips of mahogany for the joints. I think it will not only look good enough, but will actually look attractive. Let's see what happens in the next couple of days.

Now let me get back to the pickups.

I've never wound any but I did a bunch of internet research. But the information is overwhelming so specific input will be appreciated.

I am confused about the magnet. Many brands use alnico magnets, but I noticed that some home made pickups use neodimium magnets. Those are so much stronger than alnico that I don't know what would be the best option for me. Or, can I use small individual neodimium magnets under every slug, instead of trying to find a single strip/bar magnet that is properly polarized (because I can't just cut an alnico magnet that I could simply buy from StewMac).

The other dilemma is, how many turns should I use for each coil. I think tuning 9s to standard pitch on a 19" scale neck would make the strings too floppy. So, I am leaning towards using 10s that would probably give me a tension that is not too much to handle for a kid. So, what kind of coils and magnets should those pickups have?

I also want to make sure there's no misunderstanding. This will not be my kid's first guitar. He actually has a nylon string Cordoba, Guilele. I am also thinking to teach him slide guitar, as I also think steel strings might be tough for him (he is actually a bit low muscle tone, I've been told) which is another reason why steel strings might be hard on his hands.

Thanks a bunch.
 

RZK

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So, I went to the lumber yard, today, but they wanted $50 for the amount of wood I would need for the top. I do spend money on my kid, that's not the issue, but I just thought it was too much and that it also didn't quite fit with the concept of a rugged home built guitar. I also like the idea of building an instrument out of other people's garbage. So, on my way into the store I noticed a dumpster full of scraps. I asked them if I could take any and they were happy to let me have as much as I could eat.

I ended up bringing home were one block of mahogany, some narrow maple boards and a bunch of 3/4x1/4 mahogany strips.

found-lumber.jpg


I looked some more around my shop and found some more scrap maple. I think I can just make a 3-piece top (and back) and use the strips of mahogany for the joints. I think it will not only look good enough, but will actually look attractive. Let's see what happens in the next couple of days.

Now let me get back to the pickups.

I've never wound any but I did a bunch of internet research. But the information is overwhelming so specific input will be appreciated.

I am confused about the magnet. Many brands use alnico magnets, but I noticed that some home made pickups use neodimium magnets. Those are so much stronger than alnico that I don't know what would be the best option for me. Or, can I use small individual neodimium magnets under every slug, instead of trying to find a single strip/bar magnet that is properly polarized (because I can't just cut an alnico magnet that I could simply buy from StewMac).

The other dilemma is, how many turns should I use for each coil. I think tuning 9s to standard pitch on a 19" scale neck would make the strings too floppy. So, I am leaning towards using 10s that would probably give me a tension that is not too much to handle for a kid. So, what kind of coils and magnets should those pickups have?

I also want to make sure there's no misunderstanding. This will not be my kid's first guitar. He actually has a nylon string Cordoba, Guilele. I am also thinking to teach him slide guitar, as I also think steel strings might be tough for him (he is actually a bit low muscle tone, I've been told) which is another reason why steel strings might be hard on his hands.

Thanks a bunch.

:facepalm:


Start a new thread. Don't resurrect an old thread, especially for something so off topic.
 

Adinol

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Start a new thread. Don't resurrect an old thread, especially for something so off topic.
Oh, my mistake, I meant to post this in my thread. Sorry. Can Administrators delete these last posts? Sorry, again.
 

scottop1972

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freaking amazing! very cool. i may have to start one of these for my new grand daughter?
 

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