Light weight 50's Standard?

Duane_the_tub

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I agree with @ARandall about pickups. With one notable exception (Little Buddy), every lightweight Les Paul that I've owned has been temperamental about pickups and needed low-winds to deliver clear tone, especially clean. Something about the way lighter wood resonates, I guess.

Interested to see how yours turns out, OP. A lot of the guitars in that run have been pretty hefty.
 

Zoli77

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I have an R8 that is 7.8 lb and it does have that ringing, hollow sound, I think lol, it is all so subjective…… but it’s a great guitar and a light les paul just feels so awesome to me, it always did.
The first time I realized les paul weight can be a problem was after a sugery I couldn’t play my traditional standing, and now I have shoulder problems after a motorcycle accident, so the light les paul comes in handy. The fact that it plays and sounds not just great but unique is just awesome.
Really curious about the OP’s guitar now, but even if it’s in the low 8s for a standard is a great weight
 

jbash

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My Slash 50s is 8.75 pounds (before pickguard). Naturally It's got a pretty taught piano like big bass and is clear as a bell but not harsh. Its got some beef in the high end and clarity in the low end. For my tastes it sounds better with pickups on the hotter end of the spectrum. I had two different sets of typical output PAF types and some Rewind T Tops in it, and it was too clear/thin with them all for my tastes. The Slashbuckers are quite well matched to the guitar naturally and they went back in the guitar. I think it would probably sound great with some thicker and warmer A2 types (old 57 Classics) and probably righteous with a SuperD in the bridge if I felt like going HO again.

My 2014 Classic was the same naturally as the Slash yet it was closer to 10 Lbs. 50s wiring turned it into a bright, harsh mess. I went back to modern wiring and put 57 classics in it (my Son's guitar now). My Traditional and Tribute both are in the mid 9s and are warmer/dull and benefit from lower winds and zamac/titanium bridge saddles , heavy TP and stainless steel TP studs to open them up and keep them from sounding like a wet parachute over the speaker.

IOW- my experiences tend to favor the "rule" of warmer/muddy/dull sounding guitars with heavier mass weights and more open, resonant, bright instruments with lighter mass weights, but I've owned exceptions to the "rule", too.

So I've learned to judge Les Pauls like I do people- based on individual merit (or lack thereof). It's pretty easy to find pickups if you are honest with yourself about what the guitar NEEDS according to your ears instead of going with what your heart WANTs to put in it (because of hype, or it's your current fave, etc)
 

vechap

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My 2021 Standard 50 is 9.2 lbs... Sounds great, feels great... Lovin' it!!!
2018 Tribute ... 8 lb 13 oz... Sounds great as well!!! It actually feels heavier than the Standard...
 
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TheWelder

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i've sold guitars before and when people ask me the weight.... i just make it up because i don't have a scale. :io:
You could just use a bathroom scale - weigh yourself without the guitar, then weigh yourself with it. The difference is the guitar's weight, plus or minus a few ounces.

Or just be honest and say you don't have a scale. Just making up a weight when seling a guitar is sort of messed up, not gonna lie.
 

John Berrettini

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Everything I have at this point is around 7lbs. I fell in love with the full chamber when I got a new late 2006 standard 60. I loved the open air quality it had.
I have replaced that with a 2016 CR8. 7.2 lbs of chime. I also heavily gig a 1998 DC Standard at 6.6 lbs.
My shoulder can not handle the 9-10 pounders any more.
 

Rwill682

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Been hunting for a production model lately cause I need a LP style and also wanted to not spend so much that I didn't want to do pickup swaps, plenty Historics around with decent weight but I managed to score a 2021 (July according to the serial #) 50's Standard that seller says is 7lbs 15oz....
7lb 15oz is lighter than any lp I've ever played and I've had more than 20. I think the lightest one I ever played was 8 pounds 4 oz. Most L p's under 9 pounds are considered light. So if he has 1 that 7 pounds 15 oz that's very light. Is it chambered?

I don't doubt that hes telling you the truth But at the same time you rarely see them that light. If you go on sites like Sweetwater or musicians friend and look in their gallery they show the weights of the lps they are selling. I would take a look and see what the average weight is. I don't think I've seen one ever under 8 pounds.. Cheers! Good luck- Rich
 

Henning

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From the complaints I read on this page about different issues on new Gibson “off factory” items I get the feeling that the quality control leaves a lot to wish. I visited Gibson in Memphis in 2013 and still had in mind how Heritage Guitars in Kalamazoo was running. In Memphis I saw a serial production where in Kalamazoo all building was performed by luthiers, and they were proud of every guitar they brought to the stand ! And they maintained a tradition for outstanding quality - - most of them were former Gibson employees who didn’t want to move to Nashville.
Gibson has been owned by quite a couple of owners over time with doubtsome/decreasing quality, the present company expanded in many areas leaving the guitars to itself. Mass production and too poor quality control is poison to a former brand known for outstanding and faultless quality.
 

Henning

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I rememberthe “Norlin Era“ and the “Lincolnwood Era” until present.
 

MP4-22

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You could just use a bathroom scale - weigh yourself without the guitar, then weigh yourself with it. The difference is the guitar's weight, plus or minus a few ounces.

Or just be honest and say you don't have a scale. Just making up a weight when seling a guitar is sort of messed up, not gonna lie.
Easier to go on sweetwater and come up with an average. Honestly this was on a SG standard i sold, but if it was LP i'd entertain the concern a bit more.
 

zdoggie

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they have to made of something there are lighter woods to consider my gold top is a light weight LP and it sounds terrible gibson usa pickups probably the worst junk gibson had laying around so they made a garbage can out of some of the less expensive guitars, before it commit it to the boat house I'll do a pickup swap probably throbaks

zdog
 

Audrix

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My first LP CUSTOM Black Beauty was 10 1/2 pound with 9 holes in the body
made by Gibson Custom shop in 2008
My second LP CUSTOM Black Beauty was ONLY 8 3/4 pound WITHOUT HOLES in the body
made by Gibson Custom shop in 2014
Xray-CUSTOM_30-10-2008_001.jpg radiographie LP57 BB.jpg

The best sound is with the second one

Less dense wood seems better !

My last LP is a Junior (plain mahogany) is 8 1/2 pound (no holes)
Very good wood, very good sound, very good sustain
But I had to improve the fretboard finition and the settings by a good luthier for $100
 

SnakeJake

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My experience of owning and making a lot of Les Pauls and guitars in general is the light ones are a lot more fickle with pickups.
Joe Bonamassa's been on camera saying his experience with the range of bursts he has played is that the heavier ones he found to be better tonally for his wants.

So in short, you will never find any consensus as we're all different. And every guitar is made for different bits of wood, so its not like you can accurately predict what a light one might do compared with a heavier one.
I do agree. We
 

Musha Ring

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My experience with selling, repairing, and owning many Les Pauls is that for me personally, the lighter ones sound less pleasing. I find them consistently less defined, rounder, and darker sounding than heavier ones.
 
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Musha Ring

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Whether that's good is definitely up to the beholder. Les Pauls under 9 lbs. just don't feel right to me. Not saying I like the 10 lbs. behemoths. 9 to 9.5 lbs. is the perfect range IMO.

As for difference in tonality, I've never noticed a huge difference (through the amp) between an 8 pounder and a 9 pounder.
I agree with the weight range you mentioned. My preference is 9 to 10 lbs. My main LP is somewhere between 9.4 to 9.6 lbs and it sounds amazing.

My latest one is 10.8 lbs and it sounds noticeably different, even when recorded with the same strings and pickups.
 

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