Life advice needed

battra

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follow your heart, life isn't a dress rehearsal.

you may thrive or you may crash and burn. But it wont kill ya and you never know unless you try.

Good luck. :)

Hey, Mal nailed it...

But it's better to regret something you did than didn't do.
 

lǎo​wài

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Before doing anything, understand this: moving somewhere new isn't going to get you a hot, sweet girl, cool new friends, a good job or a nice pad. That stuff is all on you. You can pick a location that improves the odds of these things but, you have to go out and do it.

Pick three or four potential areas. Research specific industries and companies that are suitable for your skills. Beat the sh*t out of the bushes for job leads before going anywhere. See if you can't have at least a handful of very good prospects before visiting. Line up as many interviews as possible over the course of a couple days. Use an online site like orbitz to book airfare, hotel and rental car all at the same time (cheaper). Fly out, get a job, check out the town and bust a move.

A couple of other random musings:

- in San Diego, even the ugly chicks have hot bodies
-Miami-Fort Lauderdale is a big geographic area with hundreds of clusters of businesses
-The Dallas Metroplex (Dallas, Plano, Fort Worth) is a slightly bigger area with probably more jobs and a good state economy. It is a hike to get to the beach from Dallas.
- Check out companies like L3 and search their web pages for locations and job openings. Big ass companies living off of the govt teet are doing well. Start there.
-make sure that you have good work references.
-don't burn bridges when you leave town, you might want to go back some day
-if possible, pick a spot that is reasonable driving distance from a major airport with direct (discount airline), nonstop flights to Indi.

This deserves a quote.

I have to ask, as someone who changed locations: Why Florida? 9 months of soul crushing heat for 3 decent months, plus, you know, Florida.

I say go, but really consider the risk/reward and downside/upside of your choice.
 

So What

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All I can say, is a lot of guys would like to be in your position.

Nothing tying them down, and the world is your oyster.

Good Luck.

.
 

Hamtone

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lǎo​wài;6027825 said:
This deserves a quote.

I have to ask, as someone who changed locations: Why Florida? 9 months of soul crushing heat for 3 decent months, plus, you know, Florida.

I say go, but really consider the risk/reward and downside/upside of your choice.

Im from Maine and the heat doesnt bother me in the least, I love it:thumb:
 

rvschulz

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consider South Louisiana. great oilfield economy and should fit your current skill set. plenty warm and outdoors stuff to do. low cost of living.

I like the idea of talking to your boss about keeping your foot in the door if you get homesick. also, look for a job before you move. Terrebonne Parish - we don't have counties.
 

Tone deaf

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Im from Maine and the heat doesnt bother me in the least, I love it:thumb:

I remember you posting about the move. What is to miss about snow piled high on the curbs of Commercial St...in March!? And mud season in Maine is highly overrated (it runs from whenever the snow melts until Memorial day. You'll know mud season is over when a hoard of black flies lifts you off the ground to take you away...

I love the summer, fall and the first 3 (out of 6) months of winter in Maine.
 

Bobby Mahogany

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If you itch to leave and try something else, you have to ask yourself why.
You seem to know pretty much why and what you want to achieve is clear to
you as well.
If you don't follow on that urge you will settle for something you haven't really
chosen, something that doesn't match what you want and years later you'll be stuck
in the same place and space and you will hate yourself for not having gone to see
if there was something for you somewhere else.
So go for it. Look at the situation, plan ahead, make contacts before you move so
you don't "land" in total unknown.
You're young, healthy, you have the will to succeed at what you want.
Not much could stop you.

Good Luck!
And let us know what happens!
 

PapaSquash

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I've up and moved twice when I was single. New England to NYC when I was 22 and then to Minneapolis for my 30th birthday. I had a job lined up the first time, but not much else. The second move was even less planned.

This is important:The second time was way easier than the first. So go into it knowing that if you don't like it, you can choose again and still expect to land on your feet.

Knowing you can get up, and go out into the world and make your way is a liberating feeling.
 

bilbarstow

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Many people have said it, so I'll echo - Just do it.

Some advice though, right now Texas has the strongest economy. Lower costs of living (housing is very reasonable, groceries etc. are among the lowest in the country) and salaries are very good here. Houston area is the fastest growing in the country (census report on today's front page).

I have a place in an Indiana small town as well. It is depressed and economically disadvantaged, with high unemployment and very little opportunity. I spent this hard winter plowing a lot of snow.

Your machinist skills should be very marketable. The Energy industry (read : oil) is booming and has great need for those skills. Many ads for skilled machinists (day shifts, good bene's) in the Houston paper. And we have "small towns" all around the outskirts, if you just can't give up the semi-rural lifestyle.

Good luck. I made the move to TX in my 20's (1982) - it was the BEST major decision I have ever made.
 

ErictheRed

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Also, I just want to point out that it doesn't hurt to get your resume in really good order and just start applying to jobs online. You don't have to go "all-in" on a move yet unless you want to. You can take a little time and try to have a good job lined up for yourself instead of just dropping everything and going.

On the other hand, when I was 24 I dropped everything and went to California on a whim and it worked out, but I was going back to college and had the G.I. Bill to rely on for some income (it wasn't a ton, but it came to about $1,100 a month, although I had to pay tuition and things out of that money. It wasn't tuition + money). If I literally had 0 income I'd be worried/stressed, but that's just me.

You can live very cheaply for a while if you need to, though. But I'd start by getting your resume in really good form and applying for some jobs online, it doesn't hurt.
 

garlan87

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Wow thanks so much for all the great posts and helpful tips!

As to why I picked Florida? Well I vacationed there a few years ago and it was very eye opening. Seeing the ocean for the first time, always something to do any time any day or night. The wild life amazes me. I spent probably 2 hours each day trying to catch lizards, frogs, and snakes. It really brought out the inner kid in me. The people seemed friendly and locals were extremely helpful. I didn't party (not much of a partier lol) or really do anything except explore and relax.

I feel like it would be a positive change wanting to get away from machining and factory work. I don't like coming home from work exhausted, covered in grease and dirt, selling like cutting fluids, and metal shavings all over. Sure I make great money and have great benefits. But how much of that matters when I have to force myself through every day, week, month knowing it's not the life style I want. So moving to a different place and doing the same work would feel like a waste to me.

Job wise I'm thinking something music related of course. :D Maybe scout out music stores for openings. Possibly recording studios? How is the music scene in that area? That should help with making new friends. I'm a easy going fella and get along with everyone. I've never been fired from a work place and have gotten every job I've interviewed for. If not then I can figure something out I'm sure resorts, airport something.
I've looked at monster for jobs and it seems like all the openings on there are degree and experience required salary positions.

As far as Texas, I haven't really thought about that having never been there so Ill have a look at what there is to offer there. :)

The military, not an option. My father was in the army and served 3 terms in Vietnam. He never wanted me to join unless it was an absolute passion.

Time wise, I'm looking around fall this year to make the move. I have a week of vacation still and can use that to scope out jobs and apartments. I can sell off everything that won't fit in my car and I don't absolutely need. So goodbye 4x12 cabs. :(

Am I missing anything obvious? There is no family or friends of mine in that area.
 

ArrogantBastard

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In the same trade as you, my friend.

For starters, I'd look into Florida's job market. I don't know how well the trade is in Florida. I know up here in Michigan we are strong when it comes to CNC.

I'd then look at the rate of pay and cost of living. You may make upwards of, and I'm guessing by experience here, 23-28 an hour in Indiana, while in Florida your experience and position may only make 18-20. You've really gotta do some insane research before you make this leap. Midwest and East coast are pretty strong in terms of pay for CNC. I wish I knew more about the Southern states pertaining to this field, but alas, I do not.

Good luck in your future endeavors.
 

garlan87

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Also, I just want to point out that it doesn't hurt to get your resume in really good order and just start applying to jobs online. You don't have to go "all-in" on a move yet unless you want to. You can take a little time and try to have a good job lined up for yourself instead of just dropping everything and going.

On the other hand, when I was 24 I dropped everything and went to California on a whim and it worked out, but I was going back to college and had the G.I. Bill to rely on for some income (it wasn't a ton, but it came to about $1,100 a month, although I had to pay tuition and things out of that money. It wasn't tuition + money). If I literally had 0 income I'd be worried/stressed, but that's just me.

You can live very cheaply for a while if you need to, though. But I'd start by getting your resume in really good form and applying for some jobs online, it doesn't hurt.
So would you think it would be a good idea to contact a career counselor? To help me get everything organized and in place first?
 

ErictheRed

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So would you think it would be a good idea to contact a career counselor? To help me get everything organized and in place first?

It's hard to say without knowing your skillset and what kind of work you do. How is your relationship at your current company? If it's very good, your current boss or some other supervisor or whomever may help you with your resume and a cover letter, recommend some tips for interviewing for the same kind of job, etc. I've always had good relationships with my employers, and each one has helped me get my next job when I explained why I was looking for a new job (though in one case, I went to a former boss who had promoted outside of my group in confidence because I didn't want everyone to know I was leaving).

I'm an engineer, and I've worked in very professional settings. I don't really know much about what you do, though I've worked as a test engineer supporting a production line once, but even then I was helping the electrical technicians and not any machinists. But if I were you, I'd get a "real" job lined up with a similar company before you make the move. Or at least TRY to, if you have until Fall you have plenty of time.

Are you enrolled at a junior college or trade school or something? You can often get free advice from a career counselor, maybe have them look over your resume as well. The point is it's hard to say without knowing you, and the best people to help are the ones that know your trade and that you work with every day. It can be a delicate balance to not burn any bridges but express the desire to leave, but if you're leaving anyway, try to get some help.
 

firesgt911

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So would you think it would be a good idea to contact a career counselor? To help me get everything organized and in place first?

No. Resumes are fairly simple. There are tons of resources that can help you with one online. You can pm me if you need help or a little direction in that arena.

Switching careers isn't a bad thing either, but moving can be expensive. Having a decent paying job will ease this process. Music stores and recording studios will not be good paying jobs. Minimum wage at best.

If it were me, I would plan this adventure in phases.

Phase 1-Move to new town and get settled. This includes job, apartment and whatever else will help you get established.
Phase 2-Persue whatever career you wish, while already being employed.

When I got out of the military three years ago, I had no job and no prospects. I had a good bit of money saved up. I had to make a decision on where I was going to live. I lived in the San Francisco Bay Area where jobs are few and cost of living is high. I had been there for almost 9 years and had a well estblished group of friends and a good support system. On the other hand, I am from Texas. I could move back to Texas where I have a brother. The job market was thriving, economy booming compared to California and the cost of living seemed impossibly low. I chose to take the leap of faith and move back to Texas. I took the first job I could and moved into the first place that became available. Man, it was a good choice! Since then, I have gone through two different employers on my way to my current job. I have more than tripled my income AND cut my stress in half. It wasn't necessarily easy, but I am glad I did it. What would have helped would have been a better job when I got here. The stepping stone method worked though, but using your current skill set to secure your situation would be a huge advantage.
 

zeronalo

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I find it disturbing that anyone (YOU) would ask life experience / life changing input from a group like ours. Misfits, alcoholics, recovering alcoholics, recovering drug addicts, people with doughnut fetishes (after hour's) and most of all guitar players.

Good luck with your endeavors and remember, life is an adventure. I did mine all wrong and it wound up OK. I wouldn't change it for anything.

Freddy
 

lǎo​wài

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Wow thanks so much for all the great posts and helpful tips!

As to why I picked Florida? Well I vacationed there a few years ago and it was very eye opening. Seeing the ocean for the first time, always something to do any time any day or night. The wild life amazes me. I spent probably 2 hours each day trying to catch lizards, frogs, and snakes. It really brought out the inner kid in me. The people seemed friendly and locals were extremely helpful. I didn't party (not much of a partier lol) or really do anything except explore and relax.

I feel like it would be a positive change wanting to get away from machining and factory work. I don't like coming home from work exhausted, covered in grease and dirt, selling like cutting fluids, and metal shavings all over. Sure I make great money and have great benefits. But how much of that matters when I have to force myself through every day, week, month knowing it's not the life style I want. So moving to a different place and doing the same work would feel like a waste to me.

Job wise I'm thinking something music related of course. :D Maybe scout out music stores for openings. Possibly recording studios? How is the music scene in that area? That should help with making new friends. I'm a easy going fella and get along with everyone. I've never been fired from a work place and have gotten every job I've interviewed for. If not then I can figure something out I'm sure resorts, airport something.
I've looked at monster for jobs and it seems like all the openings on there are degree and experience required salary positions.

As far as Texas, I haven't really thought about that having never been there so Ill have a look at what there is to offer there. :)

The military, not an option. My father was in the army and served 3 terms in Vietnam. He never wanted me to join unless it was an absolute passion.

Time wise, I'm looking around fall this year to make the move. I have a week of vacation still and can use that to scope out jobs and apartments. I can sell off everything that won't fit in my car and I don't absolutely need. So goodbye 4x12 cabs. :(

Am I missing anything obvious? There is no family or friends of mine in that area.

One bit of advice: Always remember that you are not leaving a bad situation for a better situation. You are merely trading one set of problems for a different set of problems. Maybe the new set is more agreeable.

If you go, there are excellent suggestions posted already. I'm not saying you should limit your expectations, but keep them realistic.

So goodbye 4x12 cabs.

Does your car have a roof? :hmm:
 

Tone deaf

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OP - use your skills, you will get paid more. Once you get set up and have the lay of the land, you can decide to change jobs.

Look at manufacturers of things musical. For example, a high-end CNC-carved turntable plinth can go for $5k. Look for manufacturers (big and small) of musical instruments, musical equipment, etc. If you combine your skills and something that you love, your perspective might change.

If you know how to make stuff, your part of a unique minority. Most people just know how to break stuff.

Tangent: I am just starting to play around with casting some aluminum (unlikely that I am going to install a CNC router in my workshop...). I am going to make a cast aluminum plinth with a carbon fiber table board.
 

Bristol Posse

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My first piece of life advice would be don't look for life advice on a guitar forum

Having said that
Nineteen years ago I left the UK with a little under 1000GBP in my pocket and a backpack containing all of my worldly possessions

After a couple of false starts and some hard work I was in a very good place

Sometimes a change of place and throwing away the safety net of familiarity, friends and the easy way out forces you to step up and be the man you want to be and lead the life you want to live
 

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