Lets see your #1 Les Paul

Uncle Vinnie

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94, 96 Were two of the "good wood years" from Gibson. My neck is probably around the same size at the 1st fret. My 56 is very light. Why did you change the fingerboard to ebony? I put Grovers on every Les Paul I've ever owned. My Dad put Grovers on all of his Les Paul's so I put them on all my Les Paul's. After about6 weeks or so I changed the original p90s. I just wasn't that happy with the stock p90s so I put a set of Lollar p90s in my guitar. In my opinion it was definitely the right move.
I had 11 to 48 on the guitar for 5 or 6 years and believe it or not it caused the ABR1 bridge to slowly collapse in on itself. So I put a Tonepros bridge on it and set it up with 10 to 46 strings. About a year ago I had my guitar refreted in Sept of 2019. I told my guitar guy who is also a good friend that he was allowed to take three one thousandth off of the fretboard and that was it. I didn't want to lose any thickness in the neck. He did a great job and nailed it. I put 48 by 96 frets on the guitar. With the new frets it sounds even better than i could have imagined.
Changed to board because I just love ebony, always thought Gibson should have offered ebony boards as an option across the whole line of LPs. I don't care for rosewood unless it's super dark. Light colored rosewood a la Rickenbackers just doesn't look good on an LP.

I set mine up with 11-52, no problem yet with the bridge.
 

buliwyf

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My favorite is my 1969 Gibson LP Deluxe Gold top that someone routed and put in 57 classics in it. It has the Crossbanded body and I actually wrote to Gibson Technicol support and they answered me. They found my serial # in an old book from 1969,it said my LP was made in fall 1969 with a few other things. It's been years since Iv'e MVC-005S.JPG MVC-004S.JPG seen the email they sent me. The LP sounds amazing, it's not a Metal guitar but has the sweetest woman tone ever.
 

timmytVA

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Burny guitars are cool! Your 60s is beautiful. It has just the right amount of flame on the top. I've been around countless 50s and 1960 Les Paul's. And with few exceptions the flame tops were no where near the ostentatious flame tops on the R7, R8, etc...
I was on the hunt for a lemon(ish), plain(ish) top. This is first Gibson guitar. Saw it at Sweetwater, got a good deal and made it mine! In addition to the Burny Custom, I've had a ObG Junior and a Edwards Special.

Tim
 

Big electric cat

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My one and only is a 2009 Les Paul Traditional, upgraded with SD Seth Lover pickups, new low tolerance CTS pots and bumble bee caps. Sounds magical. But I play my PRS McCarty 594 most of the time. Feels like it was tailor made for me.
View attachment 492981
Great pic! The SD Lovers are great pickups.
I just put a set of Duncan "Saturday day night special's" in my 94 black Les Paul Custom.
Everytime I sound check before a gig a couple of sound crew guys always ask me
"hey, what's with that guitar? What kinda pickups did you put in that Black guitar"
I tell them they're Seymore Duncans. Then they'll tell me "no they're not! Duncans don't sound like that" Well mine do!

Stay well.
 

Big electric cat

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FYI......no 'good wood' years for Gibson. Save if you count the 50's - but mainly as a foundation time for how some people define the LP sound. Others actually use the 70's/80's as the iconic tone time......mainly in the hard rock area.
In the 90's they did tighten up some of the lower end definitions of what they would accept. But none of the characteristics that wood is selected by have anything to do with how they produce electric guitar tone.
In fact most of the criteria are aesthetic. Some mills once the custom shop got going obviously sorted out lighter weight blanks for use by the Custom Shop (and still do), but none of this had anything to do with blanks used in the USA production line. And even then the lightest blanks still don't guarantee a great guitar.
Wow, thanks for "correcting me" in such an abrasive manner.
FYI......no 'good wood' years for Gibson. Save if you count the 50's - but mainly as a foundation time for how some people define the LP sound. Others actually use the 70's/80's as the iconic tone time......mainly in the hard rock area.
In the 90's they did tighten up some of the lower end definitions of what they would accept. But none of the characteristics that wood is selected by have anything to do with how they produce electric guitar tone.
In fact most of the criteria are aesthetic. Some mills once the custom shop got going obviously sorted out lighter weight blanks for use by the Custom Shop (and still do), but none of this had anything to do with blanks used in the USA production line. And even then the lightest blanks still don't guarantee a great guitar.
You stated "But none of the characteristics that wood is selected by have anything to do with how they produce electric guitar tone" Yes, you actually put that in your post. I gotta ask you, do you really believe that?
So if I go by your logic Gibson might as well be making Les Paul Standards, Les Paul Customs and historic collection guitars out of poplar and basswood? I don't think so.
Of course the wood makes a huge difference in the tone of a guitar. And the weight of a guitar can really make a huge difference in the guitars tone. A 12lbs Les Paul Custom like my friend has sounds entirely different than my 94 Les Paul Custom that weighs around 9lbs.
What an electric solidbody guitar sounds like acousticly is a great indicator of how the guitar will sound plugged into an amp. Sure one might need different pickups, bridge, tuning keys, nut, pots etc .... to achieve the overall tone of the guitar to satisfy ones liking.
 

JeffH66

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I am late to the party, but here is mine:

Pelham Blue 57’ RI with Seymour Duncan Greenie Set currently installed. Amber knobs, Faber steel studs, Faber locking bridge and aluminum stop tail. This has one of the darkest rosewood boards I’ve ever seen, and it is so smooth. The whole guitar is just very special. It is from a special run of guitars from Music Zoo in 2011. I can’t find any detailed info from Gibson or Music Zoo regarding exactly what specs they were built to, but mine is 9lbs on the button and sounds as good as any LP I’ve ever played, but the real beauty is the way the neck feels on this guitar. The shoulders are carved just perfectly, so even though it’s a thick neck, it feels thinner in my hand and I have no trouble anywhere on the neck, even with slightly smaller hands. It’s just perfect for me.


1C65DA73-D148-49BC-A591-C316702BF5DD.jpeg
 

Big electric cat

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I am late to the party, but here is mine:

Pelham Blue 57’ RI with Seymour Duncan Greenie Set currently installed. Amber knobs, Faber steel studs, Faber locking bridge and aluminum stop tail. This has one of the darkest rosewood boards I’ve ever seen, and it is so smooth. The whole guitar is just very special. It is from a special run of guitars from Music Zoo in 2011. I can’t find any detailed info from Gibson or Music Zoo regarding exactly what specs they were built to, but mine is 9lbs on the button and sounds as good as any LP I’ve ever played, but the real beauty is the way the neck feels on this guitar. The shoulders are carved just perfectly, so even though it’s a thick neck, it feels thinner in my hand and I have no trouble anywhere on the neck, even with slightly smaller hands. It’s just perfect for me.


View attachment 493095
That is one beautiful guitar! Use it in good health!
 

ARandall

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Wow, thanks for "correcting me" in such an abrasive manner.


You stated "But none of the characteristics that wood is selected by have anything to do with how they produce electric guitar tone" Yes, you actually put that in your post. I gotta ask you, do you really believe that?
So if I go by your logic Gibson might as well be making Les Paul Standards, Les Paul Customs and historic collection guitars out of poplar and basswood? I don't think so.
Of course the wood makes a huge difference in the tone of a guitar. And the weight of a guitar can really make a huge difference in the guitars tone. A 12lbs Les Paul Custom like my friend has sounds entirely different than my 94 Les Paul Custom that weighs around 9lbs.
What an electric solidbody guitar sounds like acousticly is a great indicator of how the guitar will sound plugged into an amp. Sure one might need different pickups, bridge, tuning keys, nut, pots etc .... to achieve the overall tone of the guitar to satisfy ones liking.
FYI means its just a note so you can add it to your info. There is no abrasiveness either intended either on my end, nor that could be objectively gleaned from my choice of words or the way that I have used them.

And I think your method of inferring meaning from the rest of the post has gone a little awry too.
Selection of wood from a supplier has no specific relevance to the species of wood you choose, and grades of wood only refer to looks and the prettiness of the grain from within a specific wood grouping. Nothing of these aspects make a AAAAA graded slab of wood better for a guitar than the lowest A grade. Nor does a single slab of wood make for a better tone than a multi-piece.....even if you take away the obvious subjective nature of the word 'better'.
Of course different wood species and different weights make for different tone. In no part of my post have I made this claim, nor inferred it in the minutest way.
Hopefully we can get past these so the actual detail of what I did post - the selection of mahogany and maple from the point of view of Gibson's selection of wood as detailed from your post describing 'good wood'.
 

spartacus slim

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I am late to the party, but here is mine:

Pelham Blue 57’ RI with Seymour Duncan Greenie Set currently installed. Amber knobs, Faber steel studs, Faber locking bridge and aluminum stop tail. This has one of the darkest rosewood boards I’ve ever seen, and it is so smooth. The whole guitar is just very special. It is from a special run of guitars from Music Zoo in 2011. I can’t find any detailed info from Gibson or Music Zoo regarding exactly what specs they were built to, but mine is 9lbs on the button and sounds as good as any LP I’ve ever played, but the real beauty is the way the neck feels on this guitar. The shoulders are carved just perfectly, so even though it’s a thick neck, it feels thinner in my hand and I have no trouble anywhere on the neck, even with slightly smaller hands. It’s just perfect for me.


View attachment 493095
Supercool.
 


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