Lake Mead Update

CB91710

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Didn't taste alcoholic because I was used to drinking a handle of Jameson every two to three days, and it tasted very sweet. So... I drank it like soda... So, yes... I managed to accidentally get drunk...:laugh2:
Yep... When you're expecting a 5.5% beer and get an Olde English 800, but think it's just really skunky beer, it's easy to have more than you intended to.
 

I Break Things

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Yep... When you're expecting a 5.5% beer and get an Olde English 800, but think it's just really skunky beer, it's easy to have more than you intended to.
Exactly! For anyone wondering, the brand is Redstone Meadery, and the ABV is 12%. Good stuff. If I were to ever drink again, it'd probably be this for special occasions.
 

CB91710

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By that time, Southwest Utah should just be starting construction of the pipeline to Lake Mead they have been procrastinating on for years. It's the solution to all our water problems! ...a dried up flat of sand?
Whaaa.... I thought they were getting water from Powell?
 

dspelman

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From what I understand when the idea that the Colorado River could be a source of power and water, the area of its water supply was at the end of its wettest period in its history. In a nutshell it was an aberration and that period was returning to its norm.
What climate-change people seem to forget is the climate is always changing, and how we got to the “good times” was because the climate changed from something else.
Not the point. The use of Colorado River water (and, for that matter, the entire western US watershed) has been a political football for nearly 100 years, and between farmers who decided they wanted to grow water-needy crops, Los Angeles needing swimming pools and Las Vegas needing water attractions in the middle of a desert, water Misuse is the norm.

Climate-change people know what the climate does naturally, and they're rapidly finding that the science of what happens when climate is augmented by human error is probably even underestimating what they thought could happen.

Politics will delay solutions, because idiots abound. The likelihood is that food and potable water will suddenly be in very short supply, and at that point starvation and perhaps war will probably help fix the issue.
 

Scooter2112

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They are struggling to preserve the B29, as it is now at recreational depth and anyone can dive it on air.

It used to be a complex technical dive requiring helium and decompression stops.
Only a few Vegas dive shops ran tours to it.
Now, it is simply a deep "altitude" dive and perfectly safe on 32% Nitrox.
The only thing keeping everybody and their brother from diving it is the difficulty in accessing the boat launch, some are reporting a 6 hour wait to get their trailers into the water.
IIRC....32 percent Nitrox has a max bottom of about 110’, no? Basically, extended bottom time, yet not quite as deep as 130’ rec dive limit.
 

CB91710

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IIRC....32 percent Nitrox has a max bottom of about 110’, no? Basically, extended bottom time, yet not quite as deep as 130’ rec dive limit.
I used to try to use the "ideal gas" for the planned dive... 40% for lobster hunting in the shallows, 36 if we were going to be getting between 80 and 100, and 32 to go deeper than 100.
Ended up having too many instances were I was "stuck" with a bottle of 40% because we ended up adjusting the plan on the fly, or limited out on lobsters on the first tank.
The benefit of using 40vs36vs32 was minimal and not worth buying something we couldn't use on any dive.

32% hits 1.4ppO2 at 111ft, but doesn't get to 1.6 until 130ft. That's the primary reason that PADI reluctantly began to accept EAN32, as you aren't going to tox at 1.6 in recreational conditions.
 

murmel

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They are struggling to preserve the B29, as it is now at recreational depth and anyone can dive it on air.

It used to be a complex technical dive requiring helium and decompression stops.
Only a few Vegas dive shops ran tours to it.
Now, it is simply a deep "altitude" dive and perfectly safe on 32% Nitrox.
The only thing keeping everybody and their brother from diving it is the difficulty in accessing the boat launch, some are reporting a 6 hour wait to get their trailers into the water.
Wasn't it at around 118ft before the drought? .
 

MikeyTheCat

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Not the point. The use of Colorado River water (and, for that matter, the entire western US watershed) has been a political football for nearly 100 years, and between farmers who decided they wanted to grow water-needy crops, Los Angeles needing swimming pools and Las Vegas needing water attractions in the middle of a desert, water Misuse is the norm.

Climate-change people know what the climate does naturally, and they're rapidly finding that the science of what happens when climate is augmented by human error is probably even underestimating what they thought could happen.

Politics will delay solutions, because idiots abound. The likelihood is that food and potable water will suddenly be in very short supply, and at that point starvation and perhaps war will probably help fix the issue.
Actually it is the point if the resource you’re fighting over is naturally drying up. I do agree with the rest. The California economy could be on its way to collapse, and by extension the US economy getting ready to take a hit to the nuts. While I don’t think the builders of the Hoover dam knew that the river was at a peak, I do think that for about 50 years the down river users of the water did know something was up and did nothing.
 

dspelman

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Actually it is the point if the resource you’re fighting over is naturally drying up. I do agree with the rest. The California economy could be on its way to collapse, and by extension the US economy getting ready to take a hit to the nuts. While I don’t think the builders of the Hoover dam knew that the river was at a peak, I do think that for about 50 years the down river users of the water did know something was up and did nothing.
Right now there are nearly a million Californians who don't have access to good water for drinking. There are economic difficulties involved with some of that, but the number is growing. The resource is not "naturally" drying up; it's being over (and badly) used. Drought conditions happen regularly, but have been survivable because demands on water supply haven't been this tough.

That said, the Army of Engineers in 1930 didn't have the information they have now when it comes to planning Boulder Dam (Hoover Dam). Actually, that's not true. They knew in 1922 that the water they were allocating didn't exist, but politics intervened. Worse, Glen Canyon Dam was later initiated as a kludge to forestall the mistake, and it created its own problems. Less than two decades after Hoover was completed, it was already silting up. The two dams have changed the entire ecology of the Grand Canyon, and not for the better, and now we're paying for those mistakes. But once again, politics will intervene until there's no option.
 

CB91710

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Wasn't it at around 118ft before the drought? .
I thought it was down around 180 on average. I think it's at around 118 now.
Lake is currently 188ft below full-pool.
Right now, lake elevation is ~1040ft, March 2020 it was ~1100
 

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