kind of feels like Junior High School

SteveC

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but one good thing though, that when you are high as a kite and because you didnt want to get up you gave songs a listen to that you may not have because of that reason. at least ive heard that before :naughty:
Two thoughts on that... yes. True. And you (almost) have to listen to the entire "album" in the order that the artist(s) intended you to listen to it.

Then again, sometimes, they would put their best songs on the outer grooves, since fidelity degraded, as you moved inwards. Many a turntable (and/or tone arms) were designed to mitigate that, but ya cannot overcome physics.

And, revisiting past posts... audiophiles are the biggest of all corksniffers. College education money spent on wire??? LOL As if....
 

MikeyTheCat

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For the other point of view, I just wanted to say I celebrated the death of vinyl and never, ever want to go back.

Seriously, what’s good about 14 to 22 minutes of music at a time before you have to physically get up and change it or turn it over? “It’s your turn to change the record” is as boring and mind numbing as “whose getting the next beer?”

The other hate causing thing about vinyl is its fragility. Firstly, no one will treat your vinyl or your turntable as carefully and respectfully as you do. Secondly, no matter how careful you are, some of your much loved records are gonna get scratched. From that day forward that album is going to remind you - every damn time you put it on - that it is wrecked and you are a dumbass.

Cheers
While I agree, I was also serious about the inconvenience of vinyl keeping you engaged in the listening session. You had to go where the stereo was, sit in just the right spot and only then could you listen. If wanted something in the background you put on the radio, but listening to albums was an actual activity in and of itself.
 

rogue3

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Going retro> i've been pulling out a few of my old cassette tapes, rehersals i did with an amazing indie band i was hired in to give them a heavier sound(grunge era stuff,circa1993).
i have a tascam 4 track, heads and capstans in very nice condition(lightly used).Been running that through a wonderful mixing section on an 800 watt PA, which really has the flexability to enhance those old recordings,giving them a new life.

That is the key to boosting that old program material to sound good.

I was in great form,improvising and creating fills and layers spontaneously,Live.In the 6 mos we were together,we were more productive than any band i've ever been in.

Some *great* new tunes i had forgotten about,we never stayed together long enough to trot them out live, maybe because i was bangin the bass player(a hot irish green eyed blond). sorry,no pics,lol.
The lead singer/songwriter got miffed,pulled the plug and went solo with all the songs we had created together.His revenge. I loved working with vocalists.:rolleyes:. The blond asked me to hang with her and form a new band.She was ultimately going to be trouble,so i moved on to an all guy band.No more band sexual tension for me.Funny enough,the new material with the all guy band lost that edge.But in many ways,it was more fun.i digress, apologies.

I do need a new turntable.I have an old dual,with a high end slightly used Bang and Olufson needle cartridge.Now where to look for a platter for that nice cartridge.:hmm:
 
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Freddy G

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One of my friends tells me all the time that I'm either insane or completely deaf to say that everything still sounds better to me on vinyl. But, that was how I first heard all the songs I listen to. And yes, holding the album in your hand, looking at the cover, and the interior if there is one, like the double albums had.
There's a lot of truth in that. A lot of the issue is that when something was remastered for digital, the master itself was drastically changed. Everyone was fired up about how much clarity and crispness you could get from digital and when they remastered stuff that was originally issued on vinyl they leaned on that. Mrs. G and I have a vinyl collection but also the same cuts in digital form....so sometimes for fun we'll run the two formats simultaneously and A - B between them. The digital has clarity for sure, but usually quite a lot thinner....but not because of the medium necessarily, but because the re-issue was mastered that way.
 

Freddy G

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There are speaker cables that cost tens of thousands.
Audio-foolery. I have the ultimate method of shutting down audio-fools when they start talking about the benefits of ridiculous things like uber-expensive speaker wires, AC cords, connectors etc....
I tell them, I'm a pro audio engineer. I've worked in some of the best studios....studios that recorded and produced the very music you're listening to right now. They don't use esoteric and super expensive cables and connectors. Just good quality, standard stuff that's well made and well maintained.
 

defcrew

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For the other point of view, I just wanted to say I celebrated the death of vinyl and never, ever want to go back.

Seriously, what’s good about 14 to 22 minutes of music at a time before you have to physically get up and change it or turn it over? “It’s your turn to change the record” is as boring and mind numbing as “whose getting the next beer?”

The other hate causing thing about vinyl is its fragility. Firstly, no one will treat your vinyl or your turntable as carefully and respectfully as you do. Secondly, no matter how careful you are, some of your much loved records are gonna get scratched. From that day forward that album is going to remind you - every damn time you put it on - that it is wrecked and you are a dumbass.

Cheers
Another thing about albums is that if you have your turntable on almost anythng besidesa concrete slab you have to tip toe around to keep the vibrations from making it skip which is what I did most of my young life. We would sometimes rig up a platter or shelf of sorts and suspend it from the the ceiling by ropes so it wouldn't be so sensitive to this. I actually like the fact that they are back in as the whole package is abit of an art form but it isn't something I'm interested in at this point.

I was talking to a guy I know who is a long time recording artist going back to the 70s and asked him his opinion about the fidelity thing w vinyl vs CDs, etc., and he said, "I can't tell the difference, really. It's just something the kids are into." At hsi shows he sells vinyl--which I bought his last release on just for fun but have found myself listening to it for less due to hassle--as well as CDs and, most recently, thumb drives. It's kind of a problem. What kind of physical package can you sell? How intriguing is a little square with a USB fitting on the end?

I've got an old Magnavox stereo console https://images.app.goo.gl/xFjVfVoW4GexsH6LA that we had as kids in our home. It's nearly as big as a coffin. Actually sounds good if you don't crank it too loud. This was produced before the Birth of Loud and--like lots of amplification products--was unaware that th eear splitting levels we grew to yearn for would ever come about. Similarly, Leo Fender et al were trying to figure out how to get the distortion out of their products. Les Paul never intended the guitar bearing his name to be used to get fat and nasty power chords. They wanted clean and relatively quiet.
 
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krauley

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Two thoughts on that... yes. True. And you (almost) have to listen to the entire "album" in the order that the artist(s) intended you to listen to it.

Then again, sometimes, they would put their best songs on the outer grooves, since fidelity degraded, as you moved inwards. Many a turntable (and/or tone arms) were designed to mitigate that, but ya cannot overcome physics.

And, revisiting past posts... audiophiles are the biggest of all corksniffers. College education money spent on wire??? LOL As if....
woah woah, i just visited the sights but i didnt belong to any of em lol. you do make some more good points on being high, ummm i mean playing the whole album start to finish. truth is i havent been high since 1984-5ish so i dont even remember how it was :dunno:

and now that i think about it, i do remember people would want to hear one or a couple of songs on an album but not the rest and having to do the changing of the disc because i would want my record to be treated gently so i would get stuck being the one to put on the next music. yeah cds and or flac at home and mp3s in the car or for workouts.
 

Roxy13

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Audio-foolery. I have the ultimate method of shutting down audio-fools when they start talking about the benefits of ridiculous things like uber-expensive speaker wires, AC cords, connectors etc....
I tell them, I'm a pro audio engineer. I've worked in some of the best studios....studios that recorded and produced the very music you're listening to right now. They don't use esoteric and super expensive cables and connectors. Just good quality, standard stuff that's well made and well maintained.
I have approximately 300 vinyl albums that were all obtained back in the day. Most I bought. Some were my mom's and she never seemed to listen to them so they went into my collection. A few were given to me more than 20 years ago when everyone decided vinyl was dead.

I also have approximately 600 CDs, with many being copies of my vinyl albums. I do listen to both.

And ha ha, I have about 300 cassette tapes as well :) I did throw out the 8 tracks sometime in the 90s.
 

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I like music that isn't the most popular so I'm stuck with ordering online unless I travel far. I will avoid hearing a new release on youtube until I've received a physical copy. I can't wait for the new Monolord album in the fall, it's going to be a pizza & record night with the guys.
 
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Tone deaf

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I like music that isn't the most popular so I'm stuck with ordering online unless I travel far. I will avoid hearing a new release on youtube until I've received a psychical copy. I can't wait for the new Monolord album in the fall, it's going to be a pizza & record night with the guys.
Just head on down to Tower Records and ...wait, scratch that.
 

Kashmir

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I'll never forget the sound of Led Zeppelin II on vinyl. It was like they were in the room with me; Bonzo moving the sticks around the cymbals, then going wild when Pagie solos. I'd look from speaker to speaker.
 

Malikon

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Led zeppelin 1 on my mom's stereo as a kid was my introduction to rock. And sabbath was my introduction to metal. :dude:

By 8th grade though i was collecting tapes, and by high school it was CDs. Looking back the transition through the three mediums happened pretty fast.

And last 15 years i guess it's been mp3 and YouTube
 

cherrysunburst00

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I got rid of most of my vinyl as I acquired it on CD. At times, I regret it.

I used to hate the "pops" but honestly, sometimes I miss the "flaws" on some of my often-played Sabbath stuff. I did keep my Sabbath vinyl, and I do have a turntable that converts to mp3 or wave... :hmm: :hmm: :hmm::hmm:
 

cherrysunburst00

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One of my friends tells me all the time that I'm either insane or completely deaf to say that everything still sounds better to me on vinyl. But, that was how I first heard all the songs I listen to. And yes, holding the album in your hand, looking at the cover, and the interior if there is one, like the double albums had.
And open up gatefold covers ruled the roost for single albums as well.
 

cherrysunburst00

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I had a lot of vinyl growing up but I can still remember lighting up a joint in my moms basement and trying to learn this, I must have played it a thousand times. Learning tunes by an album was just awesome



View attachment 392545
Remember the old 16 rpm setting on turntables? You could slow down the passage to 1/2 speed and it would drop an octave
 

cherrysunburst00

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I cannot hear Jeff Beck's "Good Bye Pork Pie Hat" without cringing waiting for the spot it used to skip and repeat the same lick over and over. I've got hundreds of albums but have not played one in years. I don't hear the better sound everyone talks about and I spent many an hour listening to them and staring at the covers and reading everything about it. Kind of cool experience in and of itself but, yeah, the expense and inconvenience thing is not inaccurate.As a youngblood all my $ went to albums with a long wish list on a note pad in my room. I think the first album I ever bought was More of the Monkees!:laugh2:
SO GLAD that I'm not the only one who can't hear an improvement over CD; my first was Aerosmith's first album
 




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