Keyboard Piano recommendations

100LL

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Looking for recommendations on a good keyboard to simulate a piano. Wanting to find the piano key weighted style, full 88 keys. Purpose is simply general use and my oldest child is just getting to the starting age (he's almost 7). 2 more kids down the line so I want the thing to survive a decade of training.

thanks

Not sure where to post topic so I just threw it here. Hope that's ok.
 

LP1865

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Get one of the Yamaha ones.
they have tons of features and my ten year old cousin has been using one for 3 years
 

ehb

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Sky is the limit, you can buy a used Kurzweil, Yamaha, Roland, Korg, etc. for reasonable chippies all the way up. Casio has some nice pianos for the buck with nice key beds. I would check those out and similar in price range...unless you are being a bit clandestine in procuring a nice keyboard for yourself....

At his age, I wouldn’t plop down big chippies on a flagship. I’ve played Casio and others in the same price range that were impressive in sound and feel. Go play some...

All the keyboards are playing samples which are pretty much almost indistinguishable from the real McCoy because they are samples OF the real McCoy. Few acoustic pianos you hear on radio are actually real...plug-ins in ProTools/etc. triggered by a midi controller.
 

100LL

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I am hoping to keep it under a grand.
 

rockstar232007

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I bought my Casio Privia at GC for like $600. It's great.

Doesn't really have any effects, but a good variety of different types of piano, organ, and strings.
 
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TVvoodoo

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If you have the space NOTHING rivals a real piano, and you can sometimes get them free for the moving.
Adding we have both in our household, (cheaper old apt piano and a yama P-125) and all who play prefer the real piano.
 

ehb

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I bought my Casio Privea at GC for like $600. It's great.

Doesn't really have any effects, but a good variety of different types of piano, organ, and strings.
The Casios (not the very bottom level) impressed me. For learning piano, pretty hard to beat. You don’t NEED a workstation to learn piano. Casio keybeds are pretty realistic.
Headphones too. Must have headphone out to keep YOUR sanity.

If I were to go back to gigging Keyboards, I would buy a quality midi controller 88 key and a couple of modules, probably Roland but Yamaha for pianos.
 

dspelman

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Looking for recommendations on a good keyboard to simulate a piano. Wanting to find the piano key weighted style, full 88 keys. Purpose is simply general use and my oldest child is just getting to the starting age (he's almost 7). 2 more kids down the line so I want the thing to survive a decade of training.
Nope. A *real* piano will survive a decade, and maybe even a century. But my experience is that an electronic keyboard likely won't last that long, and that parts/motherboards, etc., will be near-impossible to find.
 

tzd

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For entry level that plays and sound good, Casio Privia.

The current version is PX-770:

I got the previous version, PX-160 for around $600 two years ago.

Strongly advise to get the full set (keyboard plus integrated stand and foot pedal) like the one above, rather than just the keyboard itself, as sitting posture is very important for piano playing.

For bench, I got this https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/BenchF--gator-frameworks-gfw-key-bnch-1-standard-black-keyboard-bench and very happy with it as well.

And... you wouldn’t think of this until you start using it, but you’ll need this as well https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07K8FQFN8/
 
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ehb

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Nope. A *real* piano will survive a decade, and maybe even a century. But my experience is that an electronic keyboard likely won't last that long, and that parts/motherboards, etc., will be near-impossible to find.
Still have one of my DW8000s from mid 80’s, and Yamaha SY from late 80’s in the back room. Only issue is the 8000 battery needs replacing. I know where my old big ass Korg DSS-1 Sampler is, no issues at all. Dunno where the other Korg, Prophet, or Moogs are, Don’t wanna know where my old Rhodes is or the Wurly. Never had an issue and we worked about 50/52wks 4-6 nights/week club gigs.

Granted, mine never rode bareback in a pickup truck bed. They lived in Calzones when not on the stand...

Not one issue.
 

Gary

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Looking for recommendations on a good keyboard to simulate a piano. Wanting to find the piano key weighted style, full 88 keys. Purpose is simply general use and my oldest child is just getting to the starting age (he's almost 7). 2 more kids down the line so I want the thing to survive a decade of training.

thanks

Not sure where to post topic so I just threw it here. Hope that's ok.
If for yourself, I’ve seen baby grands on CraigsList for under $1k. But you would have to get it moved and tuned. For a 7 year old, I’d suggest sticking with a Yamaha to see if your child keeps an interest. You can always buy a better instrument down the road. Spinet pianos are also dirt cheap on CL.

Good luck!
 

Jymbopalyse

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I've been looking around the used market for a cheap, weighted, 88 keys used keyboard.

I've noticed a lot of old Yamaha's from the 90's still in excellent working condition.
I'm looking for weighted keys with a midi out. Don't really care what the onboard sounds like as I'll run it through a DAW.

From observations, it looks like Yamaha makes a quality keyboard that can last, if taken care of.
That actually goes for Yamaha instruments in genera IMO.
They make a good quality instrument, at a fair price.
Not the cheapest . . but fair for the quality you get.
 
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dspelman

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Still have one of my DW8000s from mid 80’s, and Yamaha SY from late 80’s in the back room. Only issue is the 8000 battery needs replacing. I know where my old big ass Korg DSS-1 Sampler is, no issues at all. Dunno where the other Korg, Prophet, or Moogs are, Don’t wanna know where my old Rhodes is or the Wurly. Never had an issue and we worked about 50/52wks 4-6 nights/week club gigs.

Granted, mine never rode bareback in a pickup truck bed. They lived in Calzones when not on the stand...
I have my old keys as well, and a lot of them are in their old Anvil cases (thank you Sylvia Sepulveda, wherever you are). I've taken good care of mine along the way, and like you, I've taken them on tour and used them nearly daily until fairly recently. That said, finding replacement motherboards and memory for some of the old units can be difficult or impossible. IParticularly true in the case of the cheaper keyboards, since a lot of folks don't believe it's economical to replace boards and parts rather than buying a new unit. I can get a '59 Hammond B3 refurbished top to bottom a lot easier than I can an old electronic keyboard. Even replacement firmware can be a pretty tough find.

In short, I think expectations of some of these keyboards lasting 10 years can be excessive.
 
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ehb

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I have my old keys as well, and a lot of them are in their old Anvil cases (thank you Sylvia Sepulveda, wherever you are). I've taken good care of mine along the way, and like you, I've taken them on tour and used them nearly daily until fairly recently. That said, finding replacement motherboards and memory for some of the old units can be difficult or impossible. IParticularly true in the case of the cheaper keyboards, since a lot of folks don't believe it's economical to replace boards and parts rather than buying a new unit. I can get a '59 Hammond B3 refurbished top to bottom a lot easier than I can an old electronic keyboard. Even replacement firmware can be a pretty tough find.

In short, I think expectations of some of these keyboards lasting 10 years can be excessive.
Yeah, the cheaper ones will never be supported to any extent... There is a following for the better KBs over the years with non-OEM upgrades, hacks, etc.... That is a good thing as some had a lot of character and still do....

Probably a lot of DX7s out there being played even today... Most that even owned one had no clue just how powerful that engine was.... Korg's DW engine was killer.... Hearing an old Obie still gives me chill bumps... Filters second only to Bob Moog's.... Moog's bottom end could blow shit up if you got too happy....

One place I worked as a tech in the way back sold Kurzweil.... I would STILL love to have a fully populated 250. We had a 250 with all the boards, I used to play it at night after work.... Dayum almighty....

My fav of all time though was an old ass Baldwin grand.... I was a theatre slider munky back then.... Late night I would open the bin it was stored in offstage and roll it out in the middle of the stage, pull the blanket cover, and play it for a couple hours by my own self... It blew away the other grands in their bins... Steinways/etc.... That old ass acoustic Baldwin grand was magic.....especially on an empty big ass hardwood stage... I would prefer it over Jon's Faz even...which is a mouthful I know, but I would....
 

dspelman

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Yeah, the cheaper ones will never be supported to any extent... There is a following for the better KBs over the years with non-OEM upgrades, hacks, etc.... That is a good thing as some had a lot of character and still do....

Probably a lot of DX7s out there being played even today... Most that even owned one had no clue just how powerful that engine was.... Korg's DW engine was killer.... Hearing an old Obie still gives me chill bumps... Filters second only to Bob Moog's.... Moog's bottom end could blow shit up if you got too happy....

One place I worked as a tech in the way back sold Kurzweil.... I would STILL love to have a fully populated 250. We had a 250 with all the boards, I used to play it at night after work.... Dayum almighty....

My fav of all time though was an old ass Baldwin grand.... I was a theatre slider munky back then.... Late night I would open the bin it was stored in offstage and roll it out in the middle of the stage, pull the blanket cover, and play it for a couple hours by my own self... It blew away the other grands in their bins... Steinways/etc.... That old ass acoustic Baldwin grand was magic.....especially on an empty big ass hardwood stage... I would prefer it over Jon's Faz even...which is a mouthful I know, but I would....
The DX7 may never go away. In fact, I have a raft of patches for the Korg Kronos that replicate it, but I've seen that silly thing show up everywhere and I think there are keyboardists that genuflect to theirs nightly.

There's a really good 9' grand at UCLA's Royce Hall (don't recall the brand). I knew Ansel Adams back in the day, and he spoke at the Hall some years back, so I went to the lecture and met him after to go to lunch. We had a bit of time to kill, and he was sitting on the piano bench and whirled around and started banging something out. I knew the piece so I whirled around and started playing it a couple of octaves up, and then we broke out the silly duets. I'd forgotten that long before he became known as a photographer, he was a concert-level pianist (arthritis killed that).

My first forays away from the spinet we had at home were to a local cathedral and its pipe organ and a teacher who drilled me on Bach, Rossini, etc.
 
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ehb

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When we go up to Duke in the summers, love going into the chapel and sometimes get lucky and the organist is playing.... Pipes from hell in that place....
 


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