John Fogerty Talks Reuniting With The Creedence Guitar After 44 Years

Dolebludger

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Lt Dave,

‘I’m a little slow on the draw, but did you post that Rics have a 20.7” scale? I ask because I find it hard to believe a guitar could have such a short scale and be payable! My collection runs in scale from 24” to 25.5”, with the 24” one being sold as a short scale guitar for smaller people (like me). One of my daughters has a 50’s Gretch Rambler that I think has a 23” scale, and that is the shortest scale I have heard of (excluding some of those “mini guitars”).
 

LtDave32

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Lt Dave,

‘I’m a little slow on the draw, but did you post that Rics have a 20.7” scale? I ask because I find it hard to believe a guitar could have such a short scale and be payable! My collection runs in scale from 24” to 25.5”, with the 24” one being sold as a short scale guitar for smaller people (like me). One of my daughters has a 50’s Gretch Rambler that I think has a 23” scale, and that is the shortest scale I have heard of (excluding some of those “mini guitars”).
I'm not kidding, Dole.

The 325 started out in the Rickenbacker "Capri" family of instruments in 1958. Back then, it was called the 325 Capri. It had a 2 inch thick body, semi hollow, routed from the rear and a back cap put on. They all had 20.7 scales.


1959 saw a few adjustments and a few options. The body was now 1 3/4 " thick, semi hollow, split-level pick guard was added. A few options in pickups and tailpiece started to emerge. A "5" in Ric-speak usually means vibrato tailpiece.

There was a 310 two-pup, solid-trap tail, a 315 two-pup, vibrato tail. Still with the scale of 20.7.

1960 saw a big change. Maple was now used instead of Alder. Bubinga was now used for a fret board instead of paduak.

310, 315, 325, models were available, plus a new 320, three pup, solid-trap tail. no vibrato.

They also changed the PG from gold lucite to white plastic. Same with TR cover.

The vibrato on all models 1960 and on were made first by the Paul company, then they were made in-house in the same format, and called the Acc'ent. A vast improvement over the horrible Kaufmann that was on the 1958 and 1959 models.



The new model was called the "thin line" and featured a 1 1/2" thick body. This was the config until they stopped making them in 1975 or so, but would still make them as a special order. These years of the 1960's they offered a sunburst model for import and called it the "thinline model 1996"


I had one made special order for me in 1977. 20.7 scale.
 

tjbitt

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Original production models were 20 3/4".
 

Soul Tramp

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I'm not kidding, Dole.

The 325 started out in the Rickenbacker "Capri" family of instruments in 1958. Back then, it was called the 325 Capri. It had a 2 inch thick body, semi hollow, routed from the rear and a back cap put on. They all had 20.7 scales.


1959 saw a few adjustments and a few options. The body was now 1 3/4 " thick, semi hollow, split-level pick guard was added. A few options in pickups and tailpiece started to emerge. A "5" in Ric-speak usually means vibrato tailpiece.

There was a 310 two-pup, solid-trap tail, a 315 two-pup, vibrato tail. Still with the scale of 20.7.

1960 saw a big change. Maple was now used instead of Alder. Bubinga was now used for a fret board instead of paduak.

310, 315, 325, models were available, plus a new 320, three pup, solid-trap tail. no vibrato.

They also changed the PG from gold lucite to white plastic. Same with TR cover.

The vibrato on all models 1960 and on were made first by the Paul company, then they were made in-house in the same format, and called the Acc'ent. A vast improvement over the horrible Kaufmann that was on the 1958 and 1959 models.



The new model was called the "thinline" featured a 1 1/2" thick body. This was the config until they stopped making them in 1975 or so, but would still make them as a special order. These years of the 1960's they offered a sunburst model for import and called it the "slim line 1996".



I had one made special order for me in 1977. 20.7 scale.
Damn! Remind me to NEVER challenge the Lt. to a game of guitar trivia.
 

LtDave32

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Original production models were 20 3/4".
Not what I had learned.

But 20.7 and 20.75 are really not that different. Not preceptably.
 

LtDave32

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Damn! Remind me to NEVER challenge the Lt. to a game of guitar trivia.
I was a Ric 325 nut. The mystique around them fascinated me.

Ever since I saw JL on the Ed Sullivan show when I was a little kid.

And the album covers. I stared at it for hours.

it was the subject of my very first guitar build.

The inside of #V86, the seventh one ever made:

f1ae0b6e-6d37-44a4-9baf-ad289d976fd0_zpsde58aa8f.jpg


Me playing a buddy's 1960 310:

Dave and Rickenbacker 310.jpg


note the gold guards, but the thin body.

No more gold guards after 1960 on these models.

Here's my first build:

davids hard.jpg
 

LtDave32

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Dave that's really cool. Im sure I'd hate that scale length but still very cool
Mal, here's the thing on how it mattered to John Lennon, when he went into Steinway Musikhaus in Hamburg back in 1960 and found that 325 hanging on the wall.

His job in the Beatles back then was largely playing Chuck Berry rhythms for long periods. Sometimes they would stretch "Little Queenie" in the key of F for twenty minutes or more.

Doing that little pinky boogie rhythm in F or G for twenty minutes is a friggin' chore.

But on a 325, it was child's play. Hardly a stretch.

He said himself about the guitar "The action was ridiculously low". It was easy to play for him, especially with his job as rhythm guitarist.

He got used to it, and he carried that over until 1962 when he and George got matching Gibson J-160's.

Live shows he still played the short-scaled Ricky.

Studio work in 1962 saw him switch to the more capable J160, although plugged in. So it was like an electric hollowbody with a P-90 in it. That Gibson was used on more recordings than one might think on those first albums.

He used either the J-160 or the Ric, right up to about 1965, when he and George (once again) got matching Strats.

"Nowhere Man" -Strats.

Also a double-cut Gretch 6120. Used on "Paperback Writer" rhythm track.

Then live shows in 1966 (final live tour), he abandoned the 325 completely in favor of Epiphone Casinos that all three (Paul as well) ordered up from Kalamazoo.

footnote: Sometime in 1964-65, John was given a special 325-12 made by Rickenbacker for him exclusively. I don't believe there was ever a model for sale. 20.7 scale with 12 strings. Crowded fret board.

Possibly used on the Beatle Track "Every Little Thing".

Used during the 1965 tour sometimes for the song "Matchbox" where John played lead on it. This is a fact. I've even heard a recording of it.

A short scale 12 string played lead on Carl Perkins songs.. lol.
 

Malikon

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I read John Mayall introduced Paul to the Casino. And yeah all three of them fell for them.

But later George went to a les paul and a rosewood telecaster. But John stuck w the Casino
 

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Guys,

I wasn't challenging Lt Dave to a game of trivia. The idea of a 20.7" scale just seemed so wonky that I wondered if it was a typo. And it is great to have a real luthier as mod on this board! Rics are still sold I guess because GC, MF an Sweetwater carry them, but the price is never advertised. Instead the listings say "please call". So they are sort of a "mystery guitar" to me.
 

rogue3

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CCR is the music played in legion halls where i grew up...forever.Still today.Down home music to me.

Love all the stuff he has done...but just to throw this out there for taste...on a Stratocaster.love the tweed deluxe at the beginning of the video.

 




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