Jimmy Page ... History of his Guitars !!!

jb_abides

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When I saw Jimmy Page and the Black Crowes, Jimmy was constantly working all four knobs. The man knows how to get the most out of his guitars.
Four knobs, and depending on the guitar, pushbuttons under the pickguard.

Even the TransPerformance was messed with mid-song at one point.
 
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jb_abides

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For me, yes, that, and the tone control for the bridge rolled off a bit so I can set the amp bright and hear the neck pickup properly. Pickup low, and poles a little high sounds good to me on the neck pickup for lower output but best clarity. Old school had a different way of achieving this I am told, but sounded like sacrilege so I never tried it... I understand enough about physics to understand why it probably worked. Who knows whether Page or his techs ever did?

Liam
I always roll the tone back, never go to 11. After setting amp with all full, with the amp not so bright either. Volume much more effective that way I find as well.

My over-simplistic way of describing that approach to clarity is the bucker magnetic field looks like a 6-row banana split, each scoop with cherry on top (poles). Cherries are more dense than ice cream scoops, and more intense flavor concentration, corresponding to a slightly more intense magnetic field that bumps out of the surrounding field. You can lower the whole dish, or push the cherries down into the scoops or vice versa. More precision. Thus lowering PUP a bit while raising poles should provide more clarity per string... essentially. Depends on pickup strength, magnets, wire of course, for the actual shape and power of the field.
 

Midnight Blues

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Question for my brothers and sisters.

So yesterday I was watching the acoustic set from "Earl's Court", on the 2 disc compilation DVD that was released in '03 and I didn't think of it at the time, but later in the evening, I was thinking that I didn't see Mr. Page change guitars between "That's The Way" and "Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp". Aren't they in two different tunings, with the former being
DGDGBD (Open G) and the latter in CFCFAC (Open F)? Did I miss something?


Thanks gang and :cheers2:
 

VictorB

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Question for my brothers and sisters.

So yesterday I was watching the acoustic set from "Earl's Court", on the 2 disc compilation DVD that was released in '03 and I didn't think of it at the time, but later in the evening, I was thinking that I didn't see Mr. Page change guitars between "That's The Way" and "Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp". Aren't they in two different tunings, with the former being
DGDGBD (Open G) and the latter in CFCFAC (Open F)? Did I miss something?


Thanks gang and :cheers2:
The studio version is in CFCFAC, that live performance is in Open G (DGDGBD).
 

hecube

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Dennis Chambers talking about Jimmy Page and his guitars and amps (video is cued):

 

DADGAD

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LES PAUL 'NUMBER ONE'
JIMMY PAGE: THE ANTHOLOGY PORTFOLIO

'My Les Paul "Number One", chilling with the Song Remains the Same suit. I played the Les Paul on "Whole Lotta Love" and "What Is and What Should Never Be" and that decided it for me: it was definitely going to be the Les Paul from then on.'

The Song Remains The Same suit and Gibson Les Paul Standard 'Number One', sunburst, 1959.


The other noticeable thing is that he now has his tail piece jacked up off the deck. Not slammed like we all consider the norm. At the Foo Fighters Wembley encore
in ‘08 it was really
noticeable.
 

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Liam

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Now that takes me back... I discovered Roy Harper through Page, Gilmour and lots of other famous fans, and later on went to some lovely small club gigs, I guess in the mid to late 80s. "Whatever happened to Jugula" was an album of my formative years that I have never really been back to, but helped me to understand how to serve a song rather than my own guitar playing interests. Thinking back over the timing, it must have been cathartic for Page to get back to his roots after one of the foundations of his adult life and career had been ripped out from under him. I loved what they did over the years, and never knew they revisited it.

I still remember after the "interval" at one gig (Harper didn't have support acts that I remember), wanders back onto stage and says, "I'm not saying that was good, but if I die tonight, roll me up and smoke me." It was a different time, seems like it could have been hundreds of years ago, and is maybe a cliche, but fond memories!

Thanks for sharing!

Liam
 
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