It was so thirsty

Dogbreath

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Oil, at most, once a year. Never let it soak in. Wipe it off immediately. Use bore oil or mineral oil. Boiled linseed oil is a varnish. Don’t use it.
 

moreles

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How oily is too oily can be debated, but too dry is too dry and too rough is too rough. Gibson and Fender having been doing less and less handwork on their production guitars, leaving it up to the buyer to perform certain standard tasks, or to foot the bill by having a shop do the work. Nut slotting is trickly handwork and somewhat personal to begin with, so guitars are now delivered with slots that are deliberately too shallow (= "high," no risk of buzzing). Freboards are not smoothed (by hand) to the best extent possible before fretting. So you get mediocre action at the nut end of the fretboard, and a fretboard that feels and looks pretty lousy, too. While you can deal with the nut completely, the fretboard remains a problem because final smoothing, which is easily done before fretting, cannot be done well once the frets are in. I'm guessing that slowing delivery by a day or two to condition the fretboard (more handwork) is now a no-go, also. I'm good at all this stuff, so when I get a new guitar (rare; I buy used) I expect to spend about a week adjusting, setting, and fixing all this small crap. I often get used instruments where the original nut is untouched, and you can see that someone's played it for several years without ever having it dialed in. It's fun to make these stiff, unresponsive guitars play fluidly, but I feel sorry for the original buyer who never had that experience of their instrument. It's just sad, really.
 

Wesner477

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My 2019 and 2020 necks were the same way.

Normally, I'm in the "less is more" camp on oiling, and NEVER allow the stuff to actually puddle or "soak in"
But on these three necks... Ya... I slopped on enough to form a small pool between frets, rubbed it in with my finger, and let it rest for a few minutes before wiping down, then repeated.
That’s exactly what I did. Now, a few days later, she seems to be drying out again. Maybe she sucked it all in to help the rest of the wood under the surface.
 

Wesner477

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My 2020 Flying V had a very dry finger board on it.

After three treatments of Howards Wax and Feed, it darkened up nicely.

I guess they all come dry, but doing the set up and conditioning the board is just a part of the bonding process that I enjoy when I get a new guitar.
View attachment 505757
You hit the nail on the head!! It is a bonding process. I truly don’t mind doing it.
 

Sinster

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Too much oil is not a good thing also. You can actually soften the fingerboard glue. You oiled it, let it alone for a while now [like 6 months]. Then use "boiled linseed oil" once a year. Linseed oil needs immediate wipe off after application to prevent hardening but it's Best oil out there for fingerboards and cost like $8.00 a pint at Home Depot or Lowes. I use a light guitar lemon oil once in a while too.
Watch out for Boiled Linseed Oil used rags thy can self combust.
 

CB91710

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Watch out for Boiled Linseed Oil used rags thy can self combust.
This applies to any organic animal or veg oil, including tung oil, and even essential/massage oils.
They need to be laid out loosely so air can circulate to carry away the heat from oxidation.
For linens or rags that will be washed and reused, they need to be washed in HOT water... above 105.

The Phenomenon of Spontaneous Combustion
 

Telechamp

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The granadillo board on my 2013 Studio was getting pretty dry, so I decided to try some F-One oil on it - I wanted to darken it up a tad as well..

The F-One did darken it up some - and that dry board drank it right up - but I don't know how long the darkening part will last..

Before and after pics - -









 
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dro

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That's all many of us did for many years.
It was probably the mid 90s before I found out I was supposed to oil them.
I had an EVH Wolfgang once, No finish on the neck at all. If you didn't keep it heavily oiled. The neck would shrink and the frets would start to poke out and cut my fingers.
 


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