Is any fret buzz normal on a Gibson led Paul

Rogueaverage616

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Hi guys sorry to post this question as I have heard many, many mixed opinions,but I figure I might as well ask it myself,since it’s my concearn, from you guys who are professional luthiers.

I have a brand new 2016 Gibson les Paul standard,and a brand new Gibson les Paul Traditional.Now..I have the Traditional set up with .10 guage strings and the relief is at .007 at the 12th fret,and the action is 2mm between the 15th fret and the bottom of the low E...when I play the low E I get some buzzing while played acoustically.

The les Paul standard has .9 guage strings and the same .007 relief and the same action night.these guitars both buzz on the low E.I used a fret rocker and the frets seem pretty level
 

Skyjerk

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For my money .007 at the 12th is REAL low
 

Rogueaverage616

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Ok I set it at that because i read that Dan Erlwin recommends .005 ?? And what I’ve been reading is that No Buzz is Acceptible on a les Paul...yet both my les Paul’s do it.My 1996 Gibson les Paul studio also did it.What is your take on that.Again I know I’ll eventyally get the ...Did you try Google thing...but ,yes I did and got many mixed answers,so these are my guitars and wanted to ask a question based on me
 

charlie chitlins

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I've never heard of measuring relief at the 12th fret, but there ya go.
The truss rod only works on the part of the neck that's clear of the body, so fret the string at the 1st and 17th frets and take your measurement midway between.
This could be part of your problem.
Chances are you pick harder when you're not plugged in.
ANY setup can be made to buzz if you hit the strings hard enough, and a low E deflects a lot more than a high E.
My rule of thumb is...it's an ELECTRIC guitar.
If sounds come through the amp, then start looking into them.
 
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Rogueaverage616

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Thank you, that was the most sensible reply I’ve ever had technically so far.Yes I am a blues guitarist,and have a heavy attack.I did notice that if I picked the string acoustically,ever sooo gently, then the buzz did stop, but if I picked normally..not like u was trying to rip the strings off the guitar,but ..then again who knows??what I think is a gentle normal strum could be heavy and sloppy to others...any way I just backed he truss rod off a tiny bit and the buzz seems to be going away...now another thing should I completely loosen the strings every time I make a truss rod adjustment?? So far I loosens the truss rod a bit while the strings were tuned to pitch...or is it ok to keep loosening the strings very time I adjust the rod?
 

moreles

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This question comes up all the time and gets a range of responses because there is no single right answer. Some players love amazingly low action and of course get plenty of buzz but they don't worry about it unless it is audible when amplified (often with gain and pedals, which mask buzz further). Other like super-clean tones even unamplified, and so have appreciably higher action. And then there are the feather-touch players, with the gorilla grip guys at the other extreme. Some pick hard, some play lightly with fingers. Neck relief is often a different curve on different guitars, even of the same model. I find measurements to be useless except to get in the ballpark, or to double-check when there's a problem. You're going to play with your hands -- why wouldn't you set your action according to what works and feels best to the fretting (and then the picking) hand?
 

Rogueaverage616

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Ok , so then , it’s obviously not true then, that no buzz at all is acceptable on a Gibson les Paul? And that I should be able to drop the action all the way down to the ground with the neck straight,and still have zero buzz.If I get any ,then there is something wrong with the fret job on the guitar or something else?? Lol I’ve read a bit of that too...Again I’m coming from owning lots of strats witch buzzz so I’m not too sure about these
 

Barnaby

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Moreles has hit the nail squarely on the head. One player's 'buzzy nightmare' is another's 'plays like butter'.

I have set up a ton of guitars and always try to do so after hearing the person play, which helps a bit. Because it's so subjective, it's virtually impossible to get right, however. If possible, I do the work with them right there.

The only time I can be sure that people who haven't had direct input into the process will be pleased is when they have a guitar with super high action from the factory and I bring it down to something reasonable (but still not too low). The difference in ease of playing makes them happy.
 

charlie chitlins

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Truss rods are adjusted in a very specific way TO ACHIEVE THE PROPER RELIEF.
It's not an action screw, or a buzz screw.
If there is a buzz, one should never just turn the truss rod this way or that trying to get rid of it.
A truss rod should always be adjusted by putting a straight edge (could be a fretted string) across the effective length of the truss rod (the entire fretboard for bolt-ons and from nut to where the fretboard goes over the body on set-necks) and setting the desired relief from the mid-way fret to the straight edge. Period.
THEN, start worrying about nut slots and saddle height.
 

cmjohnson

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The Gibson standard methodology for measuring string action height is to do it at the 12th fret. Factory setup heights are 5/64" for the low E and 3/64" for the high E.

At this setup height you should not get any note outs and no fret buzz when played with a light to moderate touch. If you play hard enough you WILL have to raise the action.
 

Rogueaverage616

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I am guilty of having a very heavy attack,however as I have been testing my les Paul right now,I noticed that if I i very gently strum the string,then the buzz stops,if I strum normally for me anyway,the buzz comes back.I also just backed off the truss rod but a little bit and noticed that much more of the buzz went away...another question is,is it ok to loosen a truss rod while under string tension or should I completely loosen the strings ?
 

charlie chitlins

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I am guilty of having a very heavy attack,however as I have been testing my les Paul right now,I noticed that if I i very gently strum the string,then the buzz stops,if I strum normally for me anyway,the buzz comes back.I also just backed off the truss rod but a little bit and noticed that much more of the buzz went away...another question is,is it ok to loosen a truss rod while under string tension or should I completely loosen the strings ?
Read my post, above.
It is fine to loosen a truss rod with the strings under tension.
You CAN tighten it, but it's more risky.
Best to slack the strings before tightening.
I always loosen it a bit first just to make sure everything is free to move and feels right.
I once encountered an over-tightened one that snapped immediately on the first attempt to tighten it.
 

Troy McClure

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You could always try raising the bridge a little on the bass side or trying a hybrid set of strings with heavier bass ones. The low E is always going to be hit hardest when strumming, as the others are somewhat protected by it, and if you're not hitting it parallel with the body when strumming most of us will get some buzz . I guess if it doesn't come thru the speakers it's probably not worth worrying about.
 

fretman_2

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I think that the angle of your picking motion, as well as the attack, can also cause more vibration. If you've got a light touch, you can get away with a very low action. I don't have a light touch.

Here's a Youtube vid of guitar strings vibrating. The harder their picked, the greater the deflection of the wave form.

This question comes up all the time and gets a range of responses because there is no single right answer. Some players love amazingly low action and of course get plenty of buzz but they don't worry about it unless it is audible when amplified (often with gain and pedals, which mask buzz further). Other like super-clean tones even unamplified, and so have appreciably higher action. And then there are the feather-touch players, with the gorilla grip guys at the other extreme. Some pick hard, some play lightly with fingers. Neck relief is often a different curve on different guitars, even of the same model. I find measurements to be useless except to get in the ballpark, or to double-check when there's a problem. You're going to play with your hands -- why wouldn't you set your action according to what works and feels best to the fretting (and then the picking) hand?
 

Tweaker

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For what it's worth, all of my electric guitars have fret buzz. I've learned to live with it, after chasing zero fret buzz for way too long. It doesn't come through my amps so if I can hear it acoustically it means my amp isn't loud enough! (I don't see this adding much value, but I'm sure there I'm not the only one with guitars like this)
 

DarrellV

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Add another one to the list of players with low E string fret buzz. Mine's a 1982 Standard.

As above, if played gently all is well. I have even taken to using a lighter pick on some stuff.

But amplified, it isn't as noticeable. I play a lot of clean, so I have mine dropped till it doesn't completely choke out the chime of the unwound strings.

I have my bridge offset slightly too as mentioned, to bring the low E a tad higher than the other side. Realistically, how often are you going to play on the wound strings above 15 for any length of time anyway? A little higher doesn't matter so much near the nut end.

I also dial mine in by feel and ear, I haven't measured anything. But my general guidelines are to raise the bridge enough so the strings don't buzz from around the neck joint on up toward the bridge.

Charlie is right in that there is nothing you can do after the neck body joint. That's why I set the bridge height for that end first.

Once that is set, I lower the relief on the neck (truss rod) till on mine it is almost flat in the middle to top of the neck. I do this by placing a finger on the G string near the top and bottom of the neck and eyeing the space underneath. There should be some, the strings should never sit on the frets.

This lowers the action near the mid to top half of the neck. Again, too far and it will buzz. It's all up to what your guitar can give you.

I found going the other way gave great low action up by the nut, but the higher registers would plink out. So now I go the other way.
 


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