Interesting read on glues.

Brek

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What surprised me is hide glue is considered ‘rubbery’ not hard like bone glue is, but the rubbery join is why it’s stronger. Wonder how this relates to titebond as I read a lot of comments dissing it as too ‘rubbery’, maybe what is being repeated is not strictly correct In relation to how glues work and are we really just assuming how they work for any given job.
 

pshupe

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Didn't read this but the hide glue, and fish glue for that matter, I use dries super hard, brittle, and sharp. I have cut myself on it. There may be lots of different terms used for the same or different types of glues as well. Some "hide glue" may be bone glue, or just glue made from animals. It's a bit of a rabbit hole actually, like most things related to building instruments.

Cheers Peter.
 

Brek

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Damn that’s sharp Peter, I suppose the take away is, buy from a reputable dealer, so hide is hide etc. Intrigued by the beluga glue. Damn expensive.
 

christopherJ

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I didn't look at the link but that is flat wrong. Hide glue dries glass hard and not rubbery in the least. It's advantage is that it shrinks when it cures which helps pull the joint together.

Talking about legit hide glue you have to heat up to use, not any of that room temp stuff as I have no experience with it.
 

pshupe

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I didn't look at the link but that is flat wrong. Hide glue dries glass hard and not rubbery in the least. It's advantage is that it shrinks when it cures which helps pull the joint together.

Talking about legit hide glue you have to heat up to use, not any of that room temp stuff as I have no experience with it.
I've tried the liquid hide glue and it seems to be fine. Similarly with Fish glue. Fish glue is also liquid at room temperature. HHG is tricky to do by yourself as you need to be very quick to get everything clamped before the glue starts to congeal. I have not extensively experimented or looked into the difference in physical properties.

Cheers Peter.
 

christopherJ

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I've tried the liquid hide glue and it seems to be fine. Similarly with Fish glue. Fish glue is also liquid at room temperature. HHG is tricky to do by yourself as you need to be very quick to get everything clamped before the glue starts to congeal. I have not extensively experimented or looked into the difference in physical properties.

Cheers Peter.
The trick is everything has to be warm. The parts you have to join, any tools used to spread the glue (don't dip a cold brush into the glue), the room you are in, etc.
 

cmjohnson

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I've never tried bottled hide glue but I've worked with the real deal, chips you dissolve in warm water, often enough. The notion that it's rubbery is absolutely nonsense. It dries almost glass hard and gets glassier as it dries more. It's one reason why an old violin can pop apart at the seams and self-disassemble if it gets dropped. Odds are that the wood parts won't be damaged but the instrument would have to be glued back together.

The disassemblable nature of hide glue joints is what makes instruments made with it repairable.

I am not in favor of using it for electric guitar building. I see no reason why any joint on the guitar would ever need to come apart, with the possible exception of the fingerboard if the truss rod fails.

Incidentally, this may be considered a bit gross, but I've been around horses a lot as I learned to ride a number of years back and enjoy going for a horseback ride when I can. I've learned from that experience that a male horse who is overdue for a cleaning....down there....smells almost exactly like a batch of hot hide glue. Which isn't a great aroma.
 

Brek

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I didn't look at the link but that is flat wrong. Hide glue dries glass hard and not rubbery in the least. It's advantage is that it shrinks when it cures which helps pull the joint together.

Talking about legit hide glue you have to heat up to use, not any of that room temp stuff as I have no experience with it.
What you state is what I have read as gospel, many timeS, but this article states otherwise. Hence the ‘interesting read’. I will see if I can find what sources the author used to write the article. I wonder if the word ‘rubbery’ is not right description of what goes on, in the article he mentions hide glue has ‘give’ as in moves with the wood, whereas bone glue is rock solid and does not budge. ? Like I said interesting and for me worth reading further about. (I have a lot of time on my hands at mo) temp stopped work as have enough cash to get me through to next tax year, and I am finishing my M.A. part time now. Devil makes work for idle hands(minds).
 

Brek

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Really? Well I have no idea either then. The article does mention that sometimes hide glue is actually bone glue. Dunno either then. I think I’ll mosey on past this rabbit hole.
 

pshupe

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Hide glue = bone glue. So...:dunno:
Not necessarily but some hide glue includes all parts not just the hide. Now maybe if it specifies "bone" glue then it is bone glue, but I do not know. Is it like all thumbs are fingers but not all fingers are thumbs?? ;) There is where the rabbit hole comes in.

Cheers Peter.
 

Brek

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Yeah and why can you have finger tips but not toe tips? But you can tip toe?
 

valvetoneman

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The hhg I use goes rock hard and like glass too, you have to chip it off

I like it for neck joints and fingerboards that's about it, just for the fact it comes apart easily
 

RibbonCurl

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What surprised me is hide glue is considered ‘rubbery’ not hard like bone glue is, but the rubbery join is why it’s stronger. Wonder how this relates to titebond as I read a lot of comments dissing it as too ‘rubbery’, maybe what is being repeated is not strictly correct In relation to how glues work and are we really just assuming how they work for any given job.

This is a really good video on hide glue. Although there are many others. I understand hide glue is preferably utilized in certain areas in the guitar build process and other glues such as titebond are better used in other areas of the same build.

 


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